Hibernian/National Irish Bank, 23-27 College Green, Dublin 2

Dan O’Sullivan

Tel: 01-6755100

www.clarendonproperties.ie

Open: all year, except Dec 25, 10am-7pm

Fee: Free

Former Hibernian Bank, now H&M store, 2013. Photograph courtesy of Swire Chin, Toronto.

The former Union Bank, latterly the Hibernian Bank, building was designed by William George Murray (1822-1871), in association with Thomas Drew (1838-1910), and construction began in 1864. [1] Originally it was built with just four bays on College Green and two bays on Church Street.

The Bank of Ireland was formed in 1783. The Hibernian Bank was founded as The Hibernian Joint Stock and Annuity Company in April 1825, and later changed its name to The Hibernian Bank. A group of Dublin businessmen apparently formed the company in response to anti-Catholic discrimination by the Bank of Ireland. The bank aimed itself primarily at the Dublin business community. It opened its only branch in Dublin on 20 June 1825 with 1063 shareholders, many of them London based. The Hibernian Bank was taken over by the Bank of Ireland in 1958. [2]

William George Murray joined the architectural firm of his father, William Murray. William George Murray, the Dictionary of Irish Architects tells us, was architect to the Dundalk, Enniskillen & Londonderry Railway Company, for whom he built the railway station in Enniskillen, Fermanagh as well as many others. He was also architect to the South Dublin Union. [3] Thomas Drew was also an architect in the same firm, and he worked with Murray on the original building for the Union Bank. The Union Bank failed after just six months, and the building was bought by the Hibernian Bank.

William George Murray also designed the Royal College of Physicians on Kildare Street in Dublin after the previous building had been burnt in a fire. Murray also designed many more banks, including the Provincial Bank on College Green (now part of the Westin hotel), and insurance offices.

Thomas Drew was employed by the Hibernian Bank to add more bays to each side, from 1873-76. Thomas Drew later became President of the Royal Society of Ulster Architects and President of the RIAI, and held the Chair of Architecture in the new National University of Ireland. He married a sister of William G. Murray, Anne Adelaide, in 1871. Among his most important building, Archiseek tells us, are the Ulster Bank branch on Dame Street (the interior of which has been destroyed), the Trinity College Graduates Memorial Building, Rathmines Town Hall, and St. Anne’s Cathedral in Belfast. [4]

The building features a wonderful “chateau-esque” tower topped with ornate wrought iron railings and finials. It has another tapering belltower-type turret at the other side which is actually a chimneystack.

Former Hibernian Bank, with its “chateau-esque” roof.
The belltower-like turret feature is a chimney stack.

It is built chiefly in limestone, in the Italian Gothic style, with arcades, and has four storeys. The ground storey has deeply moulded arches splaying from octagon piers, and the corner toward College Green is squared off and one entrance door is positioned there on the ground floor, in an arched opening with Corinthian pilasters, under an ornately carved triangular pediment. There is another ornate door entrance at the other end of the building on Dame Street.

The Appraisal in the National Inventory gives us a summary:

This exuberant former bank commenced operation as the Union Bank in 1864, designed by William G. Murray, assisted by Thomas Drew... It is constructed in an Italian Gothic Revival idiom with arcading to the main floors. The bosses and colonnettes of polished pink granite, and capitals and roundels of Portland stone by C.W. Harrison, create a strong contrast with the pale grey limestone that dominates the façade. The quality and profusion of ornament is particularly striking, with many very fine details, such as the carved timber door, the chimney structure, the carved tympanums and the aedicule [niche or pediment] to the roof of the corner bay. It is located within a group of significant historic bank buildings which line the north and south sides of College Green. The former banking hall has been recently converted for use a large retail outlet.” [5]

Former Hibernian Bank, now H&M store, June 2022: The ground storey has deeply moulded arches splaying from octagon piers.

The ground floor windows have hood mouldings with foliate stops, and limestone sills.

Former Hibernian Bank, now H&M store, June 2022: the corner toward College Green is squared off and one entrance door is positioned there on the ground floor, in an arched opening with Corinthian pilasters, under an ornately carved triangular pediment.

The Inventory description continues: “…Shouldered-arch door opening to elliptical-arch recess to corner bay, with carved Corinthian pilasters with engaged marble colonnettes, double-leaf battened timber door with trefoil-headed upper panels, and having carved limestone voussoirs [wedge shaped stones forming an arch] and moulded keystone and triangular pediment with carved tympanum bearing lettering ‘Hibernian Bank’, and egg-and-dart cornice.” [5] “Tympanum” comes from the word drum, like the eardrum of the ear, so is like a drum-skin, and in architecture it means the surface between the lintel of a doorway or window and the arch above it.

The National Inventory describes the doorway at the other end of the building on Dame Street: “Shoulder-arch door opening to west end of main facade, with Corinthian pilasters to reveals having engaged marble Corinthian colonnettes, limestone step, overlight, exquisitely carved timber panelled door, and voussoirs with keystone above, set within open-bed pedimented porch supported on hanging-posts, with carved panels to spandrels, and lettering ‘Hibernian Bank 1824’ to frieze.” [5]

The first floor has more deep semicircular arches divided by columns of polished red granite topped with ornately sculpted capitals. The windows in the first floor are square headed. On the arcading on the first floor level the arches over the windows contain the initials of the banks – the older bays have the initials of the Union Bank and the newer bays, the Hibernian Bank. The windows of the first storey have slightly pointed arched hood mouldings with carved limestone masks to the stops.

The second floor has semi-circular headed openings and the storey above has round dormer windows in the roof. The stone carving was done by C.W. Harrison of Great Brunswick Street. The dressings are in Portland stone, with the finer carving in Caen stone. [6]

The original occupants, the short-lived Union Bank, are remembered by the intertwined “UBI” monogram over the first floor windows.
Newer bays can be identified by different carved initials over the windows.

The south elevation to St. Andrew Street was added in 1925-8 by Ralph Byrne.

The National Inventory tells us:

College Green facade (north) has seven bays; Church Lane facade has nine bays, two at north end being similar to main facade and of same date, three to south end being similar at ground and first floors and built 1925-8, other four-bay section being different and built 1873-6; and five-bay facade to St. Andrew Street (current main entrance) built 1925-8.” [5]

Photograph from the National Inventory of Architectural Heritage: five-bay facade to St. Andrew Street built 1925-8, designed by Ralph Byrne.
c. 1928 “Hibernian Bank Ltd., Andrew Street and Church Lane, Dublin,” held by Assoc. Prof. Joseph Brady. © Unknown. Digital content by Dr. Joseph Brady, published by UCD Library, University College Dublin. [7]

The description continues: “Limestone balconette to first floor of middle bays of Trinity Lane elevation, supported on corbels, window openings to same floor being set within square-headed frame; same bays have paired square-headed window openings to second floor, with gablet above having limestone copings with finial, and carved tympanum. Three south end bays of Trinity Lane elevation and all bays of St. Andrew Street elevation have diminutive round-headed window openings to second floor; first floor has elliptical-arch double-height openings with decorative cast-iron balconettes to middle of each opening, with timber casement windows having margined upper lights with fanlights.” [5]

Trinity Lane Elevation: “Limestone balconette to first floor of middle bays of Trinity Lane elevation, supported on corbelsfirst floor has elliptical-arch double-height openings with decorative cast-iron balconettes to middle of each opening, with timber casement windows having margined upper lights with fanlights.” [5]

The former bank now houses a branch of the clothing shop H&M.

The interior has a vaulted ceiling, which was traditionally left lit up at night for display. It has a semicircular recess on one side. The arched ceiling is very ornate. Archiseek describes it as “arched and groined, and springs from a stone cornice all around; it is covered with coffered panels arranged in a kind of diaper, with rich centre flowers in each.” Note that a “groin” is described by Alistair Rowan in his Buildings of Ireland: Northwest Ulster, as a sharp edge at the meeting of two cells of a cross-vault, and coffering, he tells us, are sunken panels, square or polygonal, decorating a ceiling, vault or arch [see my entry of architectural definitions, https://irishhistorichouses.com/2020/04/18/architectural-definitions/ ]

Initials of the Union Bank.
Initials of the Hibernian Bank.

[1] https://www.buildingsofireland.ie/app/uploads/2019/10/Dublin-South-City.pdf

[2] https://www.irishpapermoney.com/old-irish-bank-notes/hibernian-bank-token-issue-1826.html

[3] https://www.dia.ie/architects/view/3694/MURRAY-WILLIAMGEORGE

[4] https://www.archiseek.com/tag/thomas-drew/

[5] https://www.buildingsofireland.ie/buildings-search/building/50910203/23-27-college-green-church-lane-dublin-2-co-dublin

[6] https://www.archiseek.com/2010/1867-national-irish-bank-college-green-dublin/

[7] https://digital.ucd.ie/view/ucdlib:46916

St. George’s, St. George’s Avenue, Killiney, Co. Dublin

Contact: Robert McQuillan

Tel: 087-2567718

Open dates in 2022: July 1-31, Aug 1-31, 9am-1pm

Fee: adult €5 OAP/student/child €3.50

St. George’s, August 2022.

St. George’s is a wonderful Arts and Crafts/Gothic Revival house in the beautiful suburbs of Killiney. It was built in the 1870s by George Coppinger Ashlin, a former pupil and later partner of Edward Welby Pugin, son of Augustus Pugin who played a primary role in initiating the Gothic revival style of architecture. Augustus Pugin designed the Houses of Parliament in Westminster. He also designed the hall ceiling, staircase and gallery in Adare Manor, County Limerick.

Adare Manor staircase, photograph by Chris Brooks 2012 from flickr constant commons.

Augustus Pugin converted to Catholicism. In 1836, Pugin published Contrasts, and in it he argued for “a return to the faith and the social structures of the Middle Ages,” and this was reflected in his Gothic taste in architecture and design. In 1841 he published his illustrated The True Principles of Pointed or Christian Architecture in which he advocated medieval, “Gothic”, or “pointed”, architecture. In the work, he wrote that contemporary craftsmen seeking to emulate the style of medieval workmanship should reproduce its methods. Pugin also designed stained glass.

Edward Welby Pugin joined his father’s firm. Pugin & Pugin were mainly church architects. Pugin was invited first to work in Ireland by the Redmond family of Wexford (I think they lived in Ballytrent).

Edward Welby Pugin’s works in Ireland include a beautiful chapel at Edermine, County Wexford, which I’d love to see, as well as Cobh and Killarney cathedrals.

Edermine was built for the Power family of the firm of John Power & Son, Distillers, of Dublin. It was through John Power’s influence that Pugin was commissioned to built many churches in Ireland. Power was awarded a Baronetcy in 1841and became Sir John Power 1st Baronet of Roe Buck House, Dublin and Edermine and Sampton, Co Wexford. He was a friend and confidant of Daniel O’Connell, “the Liberator.” [1]

The Powers distillery was located at that time near Thomas Street in Dublin, and it must have been John Power’s influence that led to the commission in 1860 for the design of the Church of St. Augustine and St. John, often referred to as John’s Lane church, on Thomas Street.

St. George’s architect, George Coppinger Ashlin (1837-1921), became a pupil of Edward Welby Pugin in 1856, and was then taken into partnership by Pugin, who gave him the responsibility of establishing a Dublin branch, taking charge of Irish commissions. [2]

Church of St. Augustine and St. John, Thomas Street, photograph by Warren LeMay 2018, flickr constant commons.
The Church of St. Augustine and St. John, commonly known as John’s Lane Church, designed by Edward Welby Pugin, photograph by William Murphy, 2019, courtesy of flickr constant commons.
The chapel at Edermine, courtesy of National Inventory of Architectural Heritage.

Pugin & Ashlin designed approximately eight Catholic cathedrals and fifty Catholic churches as well as schools and convents. Ashlin did not design many private homes, but his work includes Tullira Castle in County Galway, and designs for Ashford Castle and St. Anne’s Park for the Guinness family. [3]

George Coppinger Ashlin, courtesy of Irish Architectural Archive.
Tullira Castle, County Galway, also by George Coppinger Ashlin, photograph courtesy of National Inventory of Architectural Heritage.

George Coppinger Ashlin (1837-1921) was from Carrigrenane House in County Cork, third and youngest son of four children of John Musson Ashlin, a Corkman established as a corn merchant in London, and Dorinda Maria Ashlin (née Coppinger), from an old County Cork family. [4]

St. George’s, August 2022.

The partnership of Pugin & Ashlin was dissolved in the latter months of 1868, but Ashlin married Edward Pugin’s younger sister Mary Pugin (1844-1933) in 1867. Ashlin built St. George’s in the late 1870s after his marriage, as a home for his family.

An information leaflet which owner Robert McQuillan gave us tells us that Mary Ashlin née Pugin grew up in The Grange at Ramsgate in Kent, which was situated on a cliff-top, and that the situation of St. George’s on the hill of Killiney would have reminded her of her childhood home. Shortly after the Ashlins moved to Killiney, the local railway station opened, and in 1887 Queen Victoria and Prince Albert opened Killiney Hill as a public park.

The view over Killiney Bay from a bedroom balcony upstairs in St. George’s.

The Dictionary of Irish Architects gives an amusing word portrait of Ashlin:

Alfred Edwin Jones, who became a pupil in Ashlin & Coleman’s office in about 1911, remembered Ashlin as a tall, commanding figure with ‘an appearance of distinction’ and described his morning routine. Each day he would catch a fast train from Killiney to Westland Row and walk from the station to his office at 7 Dawson Street. On reaching the office door he would hand his umbrella and attaché case to an awaiting junior member of staff and mount the horse which a man held ready at the kerb. He would then canter up Dawson Street to to Stephen’s Green and ride several times round the park on the track which ran just inside the railings before returning to the office to start his day’s work. According to his obituarist in the RIAI Journal, Ashlin ‘continued in active energy until a short while before his death’ and ‘preserved his comparatively youthful bearing almost to the end of his active career’. He died, aged eighty-four, on 10 December 1921, at St George’s, Killiney, the house which he had designed for himself, and was buried in the family plot in Glasnevin Cemetery.

Ashlin wrote an article which was published in Royal Institute of British Architects Journal 9 (1902), 117-119, called ‘The Possibility of the revival of the ancient arts of Ireland and their adaptation to our modern circumstances.’ He presented this in his Presidential Address to the Royal Institute of Architects in Ireland.

The Dictionary of Irish Biography tells us that under the influence of the Celtic revival, Ashlin turned to ancient Irish architecture for inspiration. In 1877 he designed a domestic chapel for A. J. Moore of Mooresfort, Co. Tipperary, which was modelled on Cormac’s Chapel, Cashel, Co. Tipperary. This was an early example of Hiberno-Romanesque, which was to become the dominant style in Irish catholic church design.

A separate entrance leads, I believe, to the kitchen – we did not see this part of the house.
St. George’s, August 2022.
The front door has a leaded fanlight with the cross of St. George, and above, a stone carved tableau of St. George and the dragon.

Other work listed for Ashlin in the Dictionary of Irish Architects is Enniscorthy Castle, updating it in 1869 for habitation of Isaac Newton Wallop, the 5th Earl of Portsmouth (born as Isaac Newton Fellowes, but later resumed the family surname and arms of Wallop).

Another private residence designed by Ashlin is Clonmeen House in County Cork.

Clonmeen House, County Cork, also designed by Ashlin, for Stephen Grehan in 1893. Photograph courtesy of National Inventory of Architectural Heritage.

Robert McQuillan, the current owner of St. George’s, very generously allowed me to take photographs inside. He and his wife are the fourth owners of St. George’s and have lived there for over thirty years. They have carefully restored and maintained the house.

Curtains hang on the back of the front door. The use of portiére rods with drapes were extensively used in Victorian homes to keep out draughts. The wallpaper is modern, supplied by Watts of London, and it copies an original Pugin design. All of the woodwork in the house is the original pitch pine, and has many Gothic details. The ceiling beams in the main hall have moulded ribs. The door to the right before the Tudor arch leads to the dining room, and to the left, the front drawing room.

The dining room has a pine ceiling similar to that in the hall. In the bow window on the left is the Ashlin crest and on the right, the Pugin crest. The Gothic designed sandstone fireplace has the Ashlin motto, “Labore et Honore.” The wallpaper design, and that of the drapes, is an original Pugin design.

The Dining Room.
Stained glass in the canted bay window in the dining room: on the left is the Ashlin crest and on the right, the Pugin crest.
The Portrait in the dining room is of Marguerite, Countess of Blessington. Marguerite (1789-1849) was daughter of Edmund Power, and she married first Maurice St. Leger Farmer, and secondly, Charles John Gardiner, 1st and last Earl of Blessington, son of Luke Gardiner, 1st Viscount Mountjoy. She wrote the book Confessions of an Elderly Gentleman, published 1836, and The Idler in Italy, published between 1839 and 1840, in three volumes. She sounds terrific! I must look up those books!
The Gothic designed sandstone fireplace has the Ashlin motto, “Labore et Honore.”

The Front Drawing Room and back study, the leaflet from St. George’s tells us, are interconnecting spaces in the manner of Pugin’s design for The Grange where Ashlin’s wife grew up. Again, the wallpaper and drapes are of Pugin’s design. The fireplace has the inscribed initials of G.A. for George Ashlin. The ceiling is stencilled, which is a feature of Pugin’s domestic designs. The area beyond the arch was initially a Gothic conservatory. There are two canted bays, one with French doors out to the lawn. The stained glass panels in one depict the four seasons and in the other, figures of music, painting, poetry and architecture.

The stained glass panels depict the four seasons.
The ceiling is stencilled, which is a feature of Pugin’s domestic designs. The chandelier has lovely red glass.
The fireplace in the drawing room had insets of pink marble and a delicate brass floral and spiral decoration, and has the inscribed initials of G.A. for George Ashlin.
The windows feature figures of music, painting, poetry and architecture.

The front drawing room leads into the back study. The arch can be closed with a sliding intramural mirrored door.

The door handles throughout the house feature an “A” for Ashlin.

The Back Hall is double height, with a pitch pine staircase winding around the sides. The staircase is similar to that in Mary Pugin’s childhood home, The Grange. The stairs feature St. Brigid cross shapes and on the newels, more initials carved for George and Mary.

The stairs feature St. Brigid cross shapes.
The Back Hall. The fireplace has tiles depicting various arts and crafts.

The window which lights the stairs is a three light window in heavy timbered frame with vertical glazed panels. The stained glass depicts St. George, and on one side is the Ashlin crest and the other, the Pugin crest, with G. (George) and M. (Mary) initials.

The stairs have the initials also, A for Ashlin, M for Mary.
To the left, you can see the stained glass of the chapel which is on the half landing.

The chapel was built following the birth of George and Mary’s only child, their daughter Miriam. It is panelled with a timber “wagon vault.” The stained glass was designed by Mary Pugin.

To the left of the Nativity scene there is a picture of George Ashlin kneeling over a crest with the symbols for architecture.

Pictures of many saints are featured in stained glass in the chapel, including St. Dorothea, St. Francis Xavier, St. Joseph and St. George, and there is a beautifully carved altar. George’s mother was named Dorothea (née Coppinger).

The bedrooms are placed facing the sea and to the south, with bathrooms at the back of the house. The bedroom in front was probably Mary’s, as it has the initials “M.A.” in the fireplace. The stained glass in that room contains symbols of the Ashlin-Pugin marriage.

The bathrooms are modern but of a suitable Victorian style.

The bathrooms are modern but of a suitable Victorian style, which I love.

The bedroom next to this has “D.A.” in the fireplace, which is probably for George’s mother Dorothea.

The stained glass in this room shows symbols of the Pugin-Ashlin marriage, and more initials.

The library is located at the top of an “elbow stairs.” It is completely covered in pitch pine and has a magnificent view of the coast. The stained glass is signed “Frampton” and dated to 1880.

There is a door in the corner which leads to a spiral granite staircase up on to the turret.

The view of the manicured terraced gardens of St. George’s and beyond to the sea, from the Turret.
We also can see the wonderful varied roof of St. George’s from our bird’s eye view in the Turret.

A single bedroom, the staff bedroom, is above the back stairs and would have originally housed three staff bedrooms. Today it is beautifully decorated with an intricately carved wooden sleigh bed, and drapes hanging from a coronet.

Ashlin died in 1921. His daughter Miriam married her cousin Stephen Martin Ashlin, who continued the firm of Ashlin & Coleman after Ashlin’s death.

After our tour of the house we wandered through the beautifully maintained terraced garden. The gardens cover approximately an acre. [5]

[1] The Wexford Gentry by Art Kavanagh and Rory Murphy. Published by Irish Family Names, Bunclody, Co Wexford, Ireland, 1994. p. 168. Power of Edermine.

[2] Dictionary of Irish Architects https://www.dia.ie/architects/view/72/ASHLIN%2C+GEORGE+COPPINGER

[3] See Robert O’Byrne’s entry with beautiful photographs of Tulira, https://theirishaesthete.com/2014/10/13/the-ascetic-aesthete/

[4] https://www.dib.ie/biography/ashlin-george-coppinger-a0250

[5] https://www.irishtimes.com/life-and-style/homes-and-property/new-to-market/step-back-in-time-to-fairytale-house-on-killiney-hill-for-9-25m-1.3472893

The Church, Junction of Mary’s Street/Jervis Street, Dublin

contact: Ann French
Tel: 087-2245726
www.thechurch.ie
Open: Jan 1-Dec 23, 27-31, 12 noon-11pm Fee: Free

The former St. Mary’s Church of Ireland was built from 1700-1704. It is now in use as bar and restaurant, with modern glazed stair tower built to northeast, linked with an elevated glazed walkway to the restaurant at the upper level within the church. The National Inventory tells us that it was designed by William Robinson and completed by his successor, Thomas Burgh.

The church has a special place in my husband’s heart because his ancestor John Winder visited Dublin to preach a sermon here in around 1720, when he was rector at Kilroot in County Antrim, a position he obtained after Jonathan Swift. St. Mary’s parish was founded in 1697, the second parish on the north side of the River Liffey (the first must have been St. Michans). It took its name from the medieval monastery of St. Mary’s Abbey that had occupied most of the north side of the river from 1139 until its dissolution in 1539.

It was closed as a church in 1986 due to the fall of parishioners, as residents moved from the city centre. The building was used for various purposes until purchased by publican John Keating in 1997. Until it was changed for use as a bar it contained the oldest unaltered church interior in Dublin, and much of this has been preserved.

St. Mary’s Abbey, Dublin.

William Robinson was made surveyor general of buildings in Ireland in 1671. He was also engineer general and master of ordinance, so was responsible for fortifications. He built Charles Fort in Kinsale, and in 1677–8 he was adviser and contractor on the construction of Essex Bridge in Dublin. In 1679 was involved in the rebuilding of Lismore cathedral, Co. Waterford, and designed the Royal Hospital, Kilmainham (1680–84). [1] In 1682 he oversaw the construction of Ormond Bridge in Dublin.

The Dictionary of Irish Biography tells us that William Robinson’s patent as surveyor general was renewed in 1684, though he now shared the post with William Molyneux (1656–98), who later oversaw the partial construction of Robinson’s design for the courtyard of Dublin castle when he and Robinson were deprived of the surveryorship by the lord deputy, the earl of Tyrconnell. Robinson went to England during Tyrconnell’s deputyship and Molyneux remained in Ireland and carried out extensive building work at Dublin castle, presumably to Robinson’s designs.

In 1689 Robin was appointed comptroller general of provisions and commissary general of pay and provisions in the Williamite army, the latter position being shared with Bartholomew van Homrigh (the father of Jonathan Swift’s friend, whom he called “Vanessa”).

Robinson returned to Ireland, and was Elected MP for Knocktopher, Co. Kilkenny (1692–3) and Wicklow town (1695–9) and in 1702 was appointed to the Privy Council in Ireland. In 1695 he rebuilt Dublin’s Four Courts, and in 1703–4 he designed Marsh’s Library in Dublin, his last major work.

Robinson served as MP for Dublin University 1703–12, and he purchased forfeited lands in Carlow and Louth in April and June 1703. His career ended in disgrace however as he was accused of shady financial dealings and misrepresenting public accounts for which he was responsible. (see [1])

Thomas Burgh (1670–1730) succeeded Molyneux and Robinson in 1700 as surveyor-general, and was also made lieutenant of the ordnance in Ireland. The rebuilding of Dublin castle, started by Robinson, advanced considerably under Burgh, but his undisputed masterpiece was to be TCD library. His work designing and building the lower part of the library began in 1712 and continued into the next decade. It was finally opened in 1732. He may have been responsible for designing Kildrought house in Celbridge, Kildare (see my entry). He too had engineering interests including navigation and coalmining. He lived in Oldtown, County Kildare, and became high sheriff of the county in 1712 and was MP for Naas 1713–30. [2]

It is difficult to photograph the church, as it is in the middle of city streets, and Christine Casey writes in her The Buildings of Ireland: Dublin (2005) that it exhibits “a curious amalgam of awkwardness and aplomb”! [3]

St. Mary’s church has four-bay double-height side elevations, with convex quadrant single-bay links to a shallow chancel which contains a lovely chancel window. It has a three-stage tower at the opposite end flanked by lower two-storey vestibules. It does not have a spire.

The west front has the main entrance door (no longer in use as the main door, which is on the north facade). Unfortunately I was unable to take a good photograph due to the position of outdoor tables and sheltering umbrellas. The doorcase is of Portland stone with Ionic columns and an entablature. Casey tells us that the lugged surrounds of the outer vestibule door are of brown sandstone.

The three-stage tower flanked by lower two-storey vestibules.
Inside the east end door.
The south side single bay convex quadrant between the four bays and the shallow chancel on the east end.
The convex quadrant and the chancel at the east end, and to the north side, the modern stair tower encased in glass.

The window frame on the east end chancel is of Portland stone, which Casey tells us “has a vigour and plasticity rare in a city by-passed by the Baroque.” She describes the window:

Above a raised granite plinth, two broad panelled pilasters support an emphatic curved scroll-topped hood-moulding with urns to centre and ends, while successive inner lugged framed have scrolled base terminals.”

Casey suggests that the gable on this end may be a later addition.

William Robinson prepared a model for this window, and may have designed the unusual plan for the church. It was completed by Thomas Burgh in 1704 and in 1863, S. Symes may have inserted new windows as well as replacing the perimeter wall with railings. The original chancel window of St. Mary’s was smashed by vandals on the result of polling at the election in 1852. The current window was set in 1910, commissioned in 1909 by John North, the proprietor of the “Hammam,” a Turkish Bath on O’Connell (then called Sackville) Street. The new window reads: “To the glory of God and in affectionate memory of his daughters Maria North (Molly) and Rosanna (Rose) wife of Joseph Armstrong also his grandchild John Hubert Armstrong (Jack) erected by John North 1909.”

Memorial in St. Mary’s church for John North, who commissioned the new window installed in 1910 in the chancel.

Inside, it is of double height with a gallery surrounding three sides. On the fourth side is the east window. The west end has a large organ on the upper floor. The centre of the floor is taken up with an oval shaped bar which is made attractive by its arrangement of bottles and glasses. The gallery is carried on octagonal timber-clad limestone shafts. Above, the gallery reaches up to the ceiling with fluted square Ionic columns. The ceiling is barrel-vaulted. Memorial monuments still line the walls. Outside, the gravestones have been moved to one end of the public square.

The east Chancel window has a lugged and scrolled surround.

Casey tells us that the building was remodelled in 2002-5 as a bar and restaurant by Duffy Mitchell Donoghue, who filled in the crypt and altered the floor level of the nave. The glazed tower holds a cylindrical elevator.

In 1761 Arthur Guinness (1725-1803), founder of the Brewery, married Olivia Whitmore in the church. His son, also named Arthur, married here also.

The National Inventory tells us: “It was the first classical parish church in the city and was the site of Arthur Guinness’s marriage in 1761. Wolfe Tone was baptized here and the church also witnessed John Wesley’s first Irish sermon... The galleried interior is one of the earliest in Dublin, and is a triumph of Classical timber design. Grand proportions combine with the set-pieces of the original organ case, east window and surviving Corinthian reredos, connected by an ornate mix of joinery and innovative modern alterations, to create a sumptuous and exuberant space. Mary Street was laid out by Humphrey Jervis from the mid-1690s and in 1697 the parish of Saint Michan’s was divided into three which precipitated the construction of Saint Mary’s. Jervis Street was named for the developer himself and was once home to seventeenth and eighteenth-century buildings. The streets are much altered now and consist largely of Victorian buildings, leaving Saint Mary’s to ground the district in its earlier historic milieu. As such, it makes a highly significant contribution to the streetscape and to Dublin’s overall architectural fabric.”

A rather simple baptismal font in the church is the font in which Theobald Wolfe Tone was baptised, and also Sean O’Casey the playwright.

The organ was designed by Renatus Harris. George Frederick Handel, who wrote the famous “Messiah,” lived nearby on Abbey Street and was a regular visitor to Mary’s to play on this organ.

The organ case, Casey tells us, includes the bases of three pipe-clusters with cherubim and scrolls.

Thirty one memorial tablets in the church are dedicated to people formerly buried in St. Mary’s crypt and graveyard.

The vestibules have early eighteenth century staircases.

Below ground, is the Cellar Bar. These function rooms are located in an area that was excavated out from underneath the church, and are not part of the original building. There are six crypts in the basement of the church, and 32 skeletons were removed and reinterred elsewhere when the church was converted to its current use. Access to the crypt was by an external stairwell in the church.

The crypt level.
The wooden floorboards leading from the external glass tower to the upper gallery of the church were removed from the Adelphi Theatre in 1995 prior to its demolition. Some of the famous acts to perform on the stage are listed on the floor.

Outside there is a public square, Wolfe Tone Park, and grave slabs are stacked up at one end of this park.

[1] Dictionary of Irish Biography for Sir William Robinson, https://www.dib.ie/biography/robinson-sir-william-a7736

[2] https://www.dib.ie/biography/burgh-thomas-a1135

[3] p. 89-91. Casey, Christine. Buildings of Ireland: Dublin, The City within the Grand and Royal Canals and the Circular Road with the Phoenix Park. Yale University Press, New Haven and London, 2005.

Places to visit in Dublin: Ardgillan Castle, Balbriggan, County Dublin

Ardgillan Castle, Balbriggan, Dublin

https://ardgillancastle.ie

Ardgillan Castle, Balbriggan, February 2022.

You approach Ardgillan Castle from the back, coming from the car park, facing down to the amazing vista of Dublin bay.

The approach to Ardgillan Castle with the view of Dublin Bay, February 2022.
The view of Dublin Bay from the front of Ardgillan Castle, March 2020.

The website tells us:

In 1658, the “Down Survey” records that Ardgillan was owned by a wine merchant, Robert Usher of Tallaght, Dublin and by 1737, the property had been acquired by the Reverend Robert Taylor, one of the Headfort Taylors [of Headfort House, County Meath – of which later part became a school and part kept as a residence, and the east wing was advertised for sale in November 2019. The Dining Hall has particularly fine stucco work by Scottish born architect Robert Adam (1728-1792), one of the family from which the term “Adamesque” takes its name], whose grand-father had collaborated with Sir William Petty on the mid 17th century “Down Survey of Ireland”. 

Ardgillan remained the family home of the Taylors (later changed to Taylour) for more than two hundred years up until 1962 when the estate was sold to Heinrich Potts of Westphalia, Germany. In 1982, Dublin County Council purchased Ardgillan Demesne and it is now managed by Ardgillan Castle Ltd. under the auspices of Fingal County Council. “

Originally named “Prospect House”, built on Mount Prospect (you can see why it was so called, with such a view!), the central section was built in 1738 by Robert Taylor, with the west and east wings added in the late 1800s. 

Ardgillan Castle, Balbriggan, County Dublin with the Dublin and Drogheda Railway 1844, photograph courtesy of National Gallery of Ireland.

Mark Bence-Jones writes in his  A Guide to Irish Country Houses (1988):

p. 9. [Taylour, sub. Headfort, M/PB]. A C18 house consisting of a 2 storey bow-fronted centre with single-storey overlapping wings, mildly castellated either towards the end of C18 or early C19. The central bow has been made into a round tower by raising it a storey and giving it a skyline of Irish battlements; the main roof parapet has been crenellated and the windows given hood mouldings. Over each of the windows was thrown, literally speaking, a Gothic cloak of battlements and pointed arches; below which the original facade, with its quoins and rectangular sash windows, shows in all its Classical nakedness. Battlemented ranges and an octagon tower were added on the other side of the house.” [1]

Ardgillan Castle, Balbriggan, February 2022.
IMG_2005
Ardgillan Castle, June 2020.

The website informs us:

Initially the site was heavily wooded, the name Ardgillan being derived from the Irish “Ard Choill” meaning High Wood. It was cleared out by service soldiers and itinerant workers in return for one penny a day, sleeping accommodation and one meal. 

The house consists of two storeys over a basement which extends out under the lawns on the southern side of the building. When occupied, the ground and first floors were the living accommodations while the west and east wings were servants’ quarters and estate offices. The basement comprised of the service floor, the kitchen and stores.

IMG_2002
The back of Ardgillan Castle, Dublin, June 2020.

Robert was the son of Thomas, the 1st Baronet of Headfort House in Kells. Robert (1689-1744), a younger son, joined the clergy and according to the Ardgillan website, was a recluse and spent his time writing sermons. He became Dean of Clonfert, County Galway. He died unmarried and the estate passed to his brother Thomas Taylour, the 2nd Baronet of Kells, County Meath. His sister Salisbury married a Bishop of Clonfert and secondly, Brigadier General James Crofts, son of James Scott the Duke of Monmouth, an illegitimate son of King Charles II!

The 2nd Baronet married Sarah Graham of Platten, County Meath. Their son Thomas was MP for Kells, County Meath, and was created 1st Earl of Bective, of Bective Castle, Co. Meath. He wedded, in 1754, Jane, eldest daughter of the Rt Hon Hercules Langford Rowley, from Summerhill, County Kilkenny. Their younger son, Henry Edward Taylour (1768-1852) joined the clergy and he and his wife, Marianne St. Leger from Doneraile in County Cork, settled at Ardgillan.

By the front door, a bell pull, I think.

We returned to Ardgillan in February 2022 and were able to see inside the castle.

Entrance Hall of Ardgillan, with shop and visitor’s desk. There are lovely plasterwork scrolls of foliage along the inside of the arches and a gothic arches pattern around the ceiling which matches the glass door and window arch. The ceiling and wall arch contain flanking rounded pillars. The fine ceiling rose is of acanthus leaves.
The Drawing Room of Ardgillan Castle.
I’m amused by the fact that the family could stop any train on the line for their personal use!

The dining room is the piece de resistance, with intricately carved oak panelling by Italian brothers Guardocici dated 1889 featuring Taylor Family crest. It also features a real stuffed bear!

The door to the dining room is carved with the family crest and detailed pattern.
The door frame features a head, and lion heads, which are continued in the wall panelling and the large cabinet.
The carved wall panelling in the dining room at Ardgillan Castle, by Italian brothers Guardocici dated 1889 featuring Taylor Family crest.
The matching cabinet in the dining room at Ardgillan Castle.

The fireplace in the dining room is also intricately carved.

The house passed to Thomas Edward Taylor (d. 1883).

It was his son, Edward Richard Taylor (1863-1938), who employed the Italian woodcarvers. He also had the library shelves installed by the Dublin firm Pim Brothers Ltd.

Edward Richard had no children so was succeeded by his brother Captain Basil Taylour’s son, Basil Richard Henry Osgood Taylour. He sold Ardgillan.

The next room is the lovely library.

The library of Ardgillan Castle.
We entered the library through a jib door of pretend books.
I couldn’t resist putting on the armour.
Stephen in The Butler’s Pantry at Ardgillan Castle.

The stairs to the upper storey are modest for such a house. Upstairs there are artists’ studios – how lucky they are, to have such a wonderful setting for their work!

The staircase of Ardgillan Castle – modest for such a house.

The website tells us:

Ardgillan park is unique among Dublin’s regional parks for the magnificent views it enjoys of the coastline. A panorama, taking in Rockabill Lighthouse, Colt Church, Shenick and Lambay Islands may be seen, including Sliabh Foy, the highest of the Cooley Mountains, and of course the Mourne Mountains can be seen sweeping down to the sea.

The park area is the property of Fingal County Council and was opened to the public as a regional park in June 1985. Preliminary works were carried out prior to the opening in order to transform what had been an arable farm, into a public park. Five miles of footpaths were provided throughout the demesne, some by opening old avenues, while others were newly constructed. They now provide a system of varied and interesting woodland, walks and vantage points from which to enjoy breath-taking views of the sea, the coastline and surrounding countryside. A signposted cycle route through the park since June 2009 means that cyclists can share the miles of walking paths with pedestrians.

The Walled Garden was originally a Victorian-styled kitchen garden that used to supply the fruit, vegetables and cut ower requirements to the house. It is 1 hectare (2.27 acres) in size, and is subdivided by free standing walls into five separate compartments. The walled garden was replanted in 1992 and through the 1990’s, with each section given a different theme.

The walled garden at Ardgillan, February 2022.
The website tells us: “The Vegetable Potager demonstrates the variety of vegetables that can be grown in shaped beds to create an attractive display. The Fruit Garden The Fruit Garden includes raspberries, red, white and black currants, gooseberries and fan-trained stone fruit on the walls. A collection of 30 old Irish varieties of apples, espalier-trained on wires, were planted in the year 2000. Varieties include: Scarlet Crofton (1500), Ballyfatten (1802) and Allen’s Everlasting (1864).”

The Victorian Conservatory was originally built in 1880 at Seamount, Malahide, the home of the Jameson family, who became famous for their whiskey all over the world. It was built by a Scottish glasshouse builder McKenzie & Moncur Engineering, and is reputed to be a replica of a glasshouse built at Balmoral in Scotland, the Scottish home of the British Royal Family. The conservatory was donated to Fingal County Council by the present owner of Seamount, the Treacy family and was re-located to the Ardgillan Rose Garden in the mid-1990s by park staff.

The Department of Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht (DAHG) approached Fingal County Council in early 2014 to participate in a pilot project to develop and enhance skill sets in built heritage conservation, under the Traditional Building Skills Training Scheme 2014. The glass house/ conservatory at Ardgillan was selected as part of this project. The glass house has been completely dismantled because it had decayed to such an extent that it was structurally unstable. All parts removed as part of this process are in safe storage. This work is the first stage of a major restoration project being undertaken by the Councils own Direct Labour Crew in the Operations Department supervised by David Curley along with Fingal County Council Architects so that the glasshouse can be re-erected in the garden and can again act as a wonderful backdrop to the rose garden. This is a complex and difficult piece of work which is currently on going and we are hopeful to have the glasshouse back to its former glory as a centrepiece of the visitor offering in Ardgillan Demesne in the near future.

[1] Mark Bence-Jones  A Guide to Irish Country Houses (originally published as Burke’s Guide to Country Houses volume 1 Ireland by Burke’s Peerage Ltd. 1978); Revised edition 1988 Constable and Company Ltd, London.

Open House, Culture Night and Heritage Week Dublin Visits

For the day that’s in it (it’s Culture Night 2022 today): this entry is not perfect but I want to publish it, and will improve it over time…

1. 9/9A Aungier Street, Dublin (Open House 2014)

2. Belvedere House, Dublin (Open House 2015)

3. Blackhall Place (formerly Blue Coat School) Dublin (Open House 2019)

4. City Assembly Hall, Dublin (Culture Night 2012)

5. Department of Trade and Commerce (2019)

6. Freemason’s Hall (Culture Night 2010)

7. Georgian Townhouse, 25 Eustace Street (2011)

8. 10 Henrietta Street, Dublin (2011)

9. 12 Henrietta Street, Dublin (2019)

10. 14 Henrietta Street, Dublin (July 2013 Heritage Week)

11. Iveagh House, Dublin (Department of Foreign Affairs) (Open House 2014)

12. Iveagh Trust flat, Iveagh Trust, Patrick Street, Dublin (Open House 2014)

13. Mansion House, Dublin (2015)

14. Marsh’s Library, Dublin (Heritage Week 2013)

15. 10 Mill Street, Dublin (2017)

16. 13 North Great Georges Street, Dublin (Open House 2012)

17. Pigeonhouse (2021)

18. Rates Office, Dublin (Open House 2013)

19. Royal Academy Dublin (2013)

20. Royal College of Physicians, Dublin (Heritage Week 2013)

21. Royal College of Surgeons, Dublin (2011)

22. St. Mary’s Abbey, Dublin (Culture Night 2012)

23. Tailor’s Guild Hall, Dublin (Heritage Week 2013)

24. Trinity Innovation Centre, former Bank, Foster Place, Dublin (Open House 2013)

1. 9/9A Aungier Street, Dublin (Open House 2014)

No. 9/9a Aungier Street, Dublin

When remedial works were undertaken the age of this building was discovered. It was first realised it was older than thought when planners appraising development changes noticed the way the fireplace sticks so far out into the room.

No. 9/9a Aungier Street, Dublin, 350 years old, what it probably looked like on outside, see lower second picture.
No. 9/9a Aungier Street, Dublin, 350 years old.
No. 9/9a Aungier Street, Dublin, 350 years old.
No. 9/9a Aungier Street, Dublin
No. 9/9a Aungier Street, Dublin, 350 years old, exposing flooring method, with original pine floor support.
No. 9/9a Aungier Street, Dublin, 350 years old, not original woodwork, probably later, decorative.
No. 9/9a Aungier Street, Dublin, 350 years old
No. 9/9a Aungier Street, Dublin, 350 years old, original walls and beams inside niche.
No. 9/9a Aungier Street, Dublin, 350 years old – layers of wallpaper.
No. 9/9a Aungier Street, Dublin, 350 years old. It was first realised it was older than thought when planners appraising development changes noticed the way the fireplace sticks so far out into the room.
No. 9/9a Aungier Street, Dublin, 350 years old, marks made by builders to let them know which beam fits into which joint, of the Baltic pine flooring, see the “v” carved into beam and joint.
No. 9/9a Aungier Street, Dublin, 350 years old.
No. 9/9a Aungier Street, Dublin, 350 years old, original fireplace.
No. 9/9a Aungier Street, Dublin, 350 years old.

2. Belvedere House, 6 Great Denmark Street, Dublin (Open House 2015):

https://www.oreillytheatre.com/belvedere-house.html

Open House 2015, Belvedere House, Belvedere College, Dublin

We went into three rooms upstairs, up the beautiful staircase. We weren’t allowed photograph on the tour, unfortunately, in the Apollo Room, Venus Room and Jupiter Room.

Belvedere House is a detached symmetrical five-bay four-storey Georgian townhouse over exposed basement, completed 1786, designed by Robert West who, in addition to being a stuccodore was also an architect and property developer, for George Augustus Rochfort, 2nd Earl of Belvedere. The house was built for £24,000 on what would have been rural green fields with a view of the Custom House, the bay and distant mountains. It is alleged that the house is haunted by Mary Molesworth, the first lady of Belvedere, mother to George Rochfort – we came across her at Belvedere in County Westmeath.

Rochfort was the son of the cruel Robert Rochfort, 1st Earl of Belvedere, who kept his wife under lock and key in the countryside after he believed she had an affair with his brother. Some believe that she was the inspiration for Charlotte Bronte’s “madwoman in the attic.” Robert Rochfort had the summer lodge, Belvedere, built in County Westmeath, now open to the public, which also has fine plasterwork. Robert O’Byrne writes that it was the 1st Earl who bought the property on Great Denmark Street. At first his son attempted to sell the property, but then he finished having the house built. Robert O’Byrne also tells us that it is similar to 86 St Stephen’s Green (Newman House, now housing the Museum of Literature of Ireland (MOLI), which was begun in 1765, and which is also attributed to Robert West.

North Great Georges Street itself was originally laid out in 1774 as a driveway leading to Belvedere House.

In 1841 the house was bought by the Society of Jesus (Jesuits) to accommodate their growing boys school which had started life ten years previously around the corner on Hardwicke Street, now known as Belvedere College.

One of the more outstanding features of the house is the stucco-work of Adamesque style popularised by Robert and James Adam. This can be seen in the ornamental surrounds, wherein pictures are framed in plaster rather than oil.

Dublin stuccodore and designer Michael Stapleton (1740-1801) was responsible for this work and further examples of his craftsmanship include the ceiling in the exam hall in Trinity College as well as some of the plasterwork in Powerscourt House in South William Street in Dublin and the Aras an Uachtarain in Phoenix Park.

Open House, Belvedere House, Belvedere College, Dublin.

It seems odd that a house designed by Robert West, however, would have plasterwork by Michael Stapleton. Robert O’Byrne elucidates this for us:

“In 1967 C.P. Curran’s  Dublin Decorative Plasterwork of the 17th and 18th centuries noted in the collection of drawings left by stuccodore Michael Stapleton several items directly relating to the design of ceilings in Belvedere House. Accordingly, this work was assigned to Stapleton. However, the fact that West was responsible for designing the house complicates matters, and the consensus now appears to be that both he and Stapleton had a hand in the plasterwork. Conor Lucey (in The Stapleton Collection, 2007) suggests that Stapleton may have been apprenticed to, or trained with, West and the fact that he was named the sole executor of the latter’s will in 1790 indicates the two men were close. The source material for the stucco work is diverse, that in the stair hall deriving in part from a plate in Robert Adam’s Works in Architecture, but the first-floor rooms feature a wider range of inspiration, much of it from France and Italy.”

Open House 2015, Belvedere House, Belvedere College, Dublin – excuse the shakey camera – I need to visit again!

We were given a leaflet, which tells us:

The ground floor rooms were intended for everyday and business use and therefore are minimally ornamented. However when one ascends they will encounter Stapleton’s stucco-work that depicts scenes from Greek and Roman mythology. On the half-landing the Bacchanalia is celebrated. The left panel depicts Bacchus with his thyrsis and staff, the right panel is Ceres with her cornucopia. The central oval shows Cupid being demoted by the three Graces. The arched window is ornamented with symbols of the authority of ancient Rome. The tall pilasters on each side have the Green anthemion (honeysuckle) motifs.

At the top of the stairs the panel between the two doors on the right show Juno seated on a cloud with her peacock. The panel on the centre wall is Aurora in her chariot pulled by winged horses. Under this plaque “The New Bride” from an ancient marble popular in 18th century Rome. All the five doors have the same over-door: Silenus, the tutor of Bacchus. On the ceiling, Eros is depicted gazing at Psyche as she sleeps. Next is an Apollo head with winged lions and lastly, Cupid with a flower.

The door immediately to the right of the stairs leads to the Apollo Room, named after the featured frieze of Apollo the music-maker holding court with attendent putti playing a variety of instruments. The adjoining Diana Room depicts Diana, patron of the chase, in a chariot drawn by stags. The design is taken directly from Pergolesi, however, Stapleton added the outer circle of flowers.

Finally the Venus Room’s flanking panels have lunettes representing astronomy, architecture and sculpture. Notice the beautiful over-doors in all three rooms, each with the head of the principle subject.”

Notice that Venus was taken down by the Jesuits as she was nude, and it is supposedly in the National Gallery.

3. Blackhall Place (formerly Blue Coat School) Dublin, 2019.

Blackhall Place, Dublin, or The Blue Coat School, by Thomas Ivory, 2019. A taller tower was initially planned.

Archiseek tells us that the first Blue Coat School or King’s Hospital was erected in Oxmantown Green between 1669-1673. It was officially named the Hospital and Free School of King Charles II. Orphans were nominated to attend the school by the Alderman or the parish, with funding coming from voluntary donations and from ground rent of St. Stephen’s Green. This building was demolished to make way for the new building, pictured above. The current building was started in 1773. Ivory resigned in disgust before it was finished, due to lack of funds, and only a stub was built instead of his tower, and the stub was removed in 1894 and a dome constructed.

The description of the tour tells us:

The last of Dublin’s Palladian public buildings, the granite and Portland stone Blue Coat School replaced earlier premises, which had been established by King Charles I in 1671 to care for the sons of impoverished citizens. Construction began in 1773 to designs by Thomas Ivory, however funding issues led to a reduced building programme and Ivory’s departure. In 1894, a copper-clad cupola designed by Robert Stirling was added. Today, the building is home to the Law Society of Ireland, which has taken great care to retain many fine interior features.

Blackhall Place, Dublin, or The Blue Coat School, by Thomas Ivory, 2019.

The building now houses the Law Society. It was built as a traditional country house composition with a central block, two wings and connecting passages. The wings have decorations intended to mirror the central tower.

Blackhall Place, Dublin, or The Blue Coat School, by Thomas Ivory, 2019.
Blackhall Place, Dublin, or The Blue Coat School, by Thomas Ivory, 2019.
Blackhall Place, Dublin, or The Blue Coat School, by Thomas Ivory, 2019.
Blackhall Place, Dublin, or The Blue Coat School, by Thomas Ivory, 2019.
Blackhall Place, Dublin, or The Blue Coat School, by Thomas Ivory, 2019.
Blackhall Place, Dublin, or The Blue Coat School, by Thomas Ivory, 2019.
Stephen Trotter, Judge of the Prerogative Court, by Peter Scheemakers (1691-1781), brought from Duleek, County Louth.
Blackhall Place, Dublin, or The Blue Coat School, by Thomas Ivory, 2019.

The interior contains plasterwork by Charles Thorpe and carvings by Simon Vierpyl.

Blackhall Place, Dublin, or The Blue Coat School, by Thomas Ivory, 2019.
Blackhall Place, Dublin, or The Blue Coat School, by Thomas Ivory, 2019.
Blackhall Place, Dublin, or The Blue Coat School, by Thomas Ivory, 2019.
Blackhall Place, Dublin, or The Blue Coat School, by Thomas Ivory, 2019.
Blackhall Place, Dublin, or The Blue Coat School, by Thomas Ivory, 2019.
Blackhall Place, Dublin, or The Blue Coat School, by Thomas Ivory, 2019.
Blackhall Place, Dublin, or The Blue Coat School, by Thomas Ivory, 2019.
Blackhall Place, Dublin, or The Blue Coat School, by Thomas Ivory, 2019.
Blackhall Place, Dublin, or The Blue Coat School, by Thomas Ivory, 2019.
Blackhall Place, Dublin, or The Blue Coat School, by Thomas Ivory, 2019.
Blackhall Place, Dublin, or The Blue Coat School, by Thomas Ivory, 2019.
Blackhall Place, Dublin, or The Blue Coat School, by Thomas Ivory, 2019.
Blackhall Place, Dublin, or The Blue Coat School, by Thomas Ivory, 2019.
Blackhall Place, Dublin, or The Blue Coat School, by Thomas Ivory, 2019.
back of Blackhall Place, Dublin, or The Blue Coat School, by Thomas Ivory, 2019.
back of Blackhall Place, Dublin, or The Blue Coat School, by Thomas Ivory, 2019.
Collins Barracks, behind Blue Coat School/Blackhall Place, 2019.
Collins Barracks behind Blackhall Place, 2019.
Back of Blackhall Place, Dublin, or The Blue Coat School, by Thomas Ivory, 2019.
back of Blackhall Place, Dublin, or The Blue Coat School, by Thomas Ivory, 2019.
Side of Blackhall Place, Dublin, or The Blue Coat School, by Thomas Ivory, 2019.
side of Blackhall Place, Dublin, or The Blue Coat School, by Thomas Ivory, 2019.
side of Blackhall Place, Dublin, or The Blue Coat School, by Thomas Ivory, 2019.
side of Blackhall Place, Dublin, or The Blue Coat School, by Thomas Ivory, 2019.
side of Blackhall Place, Dublin, or The Blue Coat School, by Thomas Ivory, 2019.

4. City Assembly Hall, Dublin (2012 Culture Night)

The Octagon Room of the City Assembly Hall, Dublin, in September 2012, after renovation by the Irish Georgian Society.
2012: City Assembly Hall, Dublin.
2012: City Assembly Hall, Dublin.
2012: City Assembly Hall, Dublin.
2012: City Assembly Hall, Dublin.
City Assembly Rooms lantern light and balcony September 2021.
2012: inside the octagon room in the City Assembly Hall, Dublin.
2012: City Assembly Hall, Dublin.
Upper room in City Assembly Hall, Dublin, September 2021.

5. Department of Industry and Commerce, Kildare Street (Open House 2019)

Department of Industry and Commerce, Open House 2019: The tall round-headed window passes up through the floors to a keystone of representing Eire, with “jazzy” interstitial panels.
The carved lintel of the doorway represents the celtic god Lugh releasing aeroplanes into the air!

The architect was J. R. Boyd Barrett, who won a competition to built it in 1936. It has a stripped Classical design with an Art Deco entrance bay addition. The external relief sculptures are by Gabriel Hayes. The tall round-headed window passes up through the floors to a keystone of representing Eire, with “jazzy” interstitial panels [Archiseek]. On the Schoolhouse Lane side the keystone represents Brendan the Navigator. The main entrance has a heavy cast bronze gates, and the carved lintel of the doorway represents the celtic god Lugh releasing aeroplanes into the air!

On the Schoolhouse Lane side the keystone represents Brendan the Navigator.
Department of Industry and Commerce, Open House 2019.
Department of Trade and Commerce, Open House 2019.
Department of Trade and Commerce, Open House 2019. The relief carvings here represent stylised images of industry and commerce.

The interiors were also designed by Boyd Barrett and everything from the ashtrays, fireplaces and door handles were specially designed. The interiors feature polished woods and metals and patterned linoleum floors, and the ceilings are deeply coffered.

Department of Trade and Commerce, Open House 2019. The interiors were also designed by Boyd Barrett and everything from the ashtrays, fireplaces and door handles were specially designed.
Department of Trade and Commerce, Open House 2019.
Department of Trade and Commerce, Open House 2019.

6. Freemason’s Hall, Molesworth Street (Dublin 2010)

Freemason’s Hall, Molesworth Street, Dublin, 2022.

The Freemason’s Hall was built on the site of the townhouse of their first Grand Master, the Earl of Rosse. The building was completed in 1866, designed by Edward Holmes of Birmingham. The architect used three orders on the facade: Doric (lower), Ionic (centre) and Corinthian (upper). The pediment contains the Masonic square and compass.

The inside is an exuberant smorgasbord of themes. The Royal Arch Chapter Room has an Egyptian theme. The Prince Mason’s Chapter Room is Gothic Tudor. The Knights Templar Room is designed as a medieval chapel.

The Irish Builder 1877 described the interior: The main hall “is larger than St. Patrick’s Hall in Dublin Castle…Along each side are six pillars with Corinthian capitals, and there are two of the same style at each end. These are painted to represent white enamel. The capitals are gilt, the pedestals and lower part of the wall are painted a rich chocolate colour; between the pillars the wall spaces are painted a light dun colour, each space being formed into a large panel by a matted gilt moulding with a deep margin of grey. The pillars support a richly designed and gilt entablature. From this spring five semi-circular arches on each side. These arches contain a series of ten cartoons, illustrative of the building of Solomon’s Temple. The ceiling is intersected by beams, which divide it into five panels, and is painted blue, and studded with gold stars. The intersecting beams, together with the architrave and cornice, are cream colour and white, relieved with gold. The predominating colour in the painting of the hall is blue, in order to meet Masonic requirements, that colour being associated with the lower ranks of the order, and the hall being used for general meetings; but other tints are introduced in sufficient abundance. The cartoons have been painted in sepia by Mr. Edward Gibson, Great Russell Street, London, son of Mr. James Gibson of Mary Street, Dublin, by whom the entire of the rest of the hall was designed and finished...”

Freemason’s Hall, Molesworth Street, Dublin, 2022.
Freemason’s Hall, Molesworth Street, Dublin, 2022.

7. Georgian Townhouse, 25 Eustace Street (2011)

Open House 2011, 25 Eustace Street.
Open House 2011, 25 Eustace Street.
Open House 2011, 25 Eustace Street.
Open House 2011, 25 Eustace Street.
Open House 2011, 25 Eustace Street.
Open House 2011, 25 Eustace Street.
Open House 2011, 25 Eustace Street.

8. 10 Henrietta Street, (Blessington House), Dublin (2011)

Open House, 2011, 10 Henrietta Street

The Archiseek website tells us:

It was built circa 1730 by Luke Gardiner [1690-1755] as his own residence. The design of the original building has been attributed to Sir Edward Lovett Pearce. The building is a three storey, eight bay over basement house with a Venetian window between the second and third bays at first floor level. Two major interiors of the 1730’s survive, the upper part of the original main stair hall and a rear room on the ground floor. The first floor reception rooms were embellished with Rococo plasterwork circa 1760. Luke Gardiner was succeeded on his death in 1755 by his son, the Right Honourable Charles Gardiner PC, MP, Surveyor General of Customs and Ranger of the Phoenix Park [The original house was extended to the west c.1755 by Charles Gardiner]. Following his death in 1769, his son, the right honourable Luke Gardiner MP succeeded. He was created Baron Mountjoy in 1779, Viscount in 1795 and killed in the Battle of New Ross, County Wexford in 1798. He was succeeded by his son Charles John Gardiner, Second Viscount Mountjoy, created Earl of Blessington in 1816. 

Luke Gardiner, M.P., (d.1755), Vice-Treasurer of Ireland and building developer in Dublin Engraver John Brooks, Irish, fl.1730-1756 After Charles Jervas, Irish, c.1675-1739, photograph courtesy of National Gallery of Ireland.

The Earl died in 1829 without male heirs and the house was leased to a succession of lawyers becoming the Queen’s Inn Chambers in the late 19th century. It was acquired in the early 20th century by the French Order of Daughters of Charity of St Vincent de Paul to provide relief to distressed females. The work of the order continues today and the building is actively used for a variety of community and social services projects. 

The 2001 Europa Nostra Restoration Fund Grant generously contributed to the restoration of the decayed decorative Rococo ceiling on the first floor. The restoration works were also co-funded by a grant from Dublin City Council.” 

Open House, 2011, 10 Henrietta Street
Open House, 2011, 10 Henrietta Street
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Henrietta Crofts, Duchess of Bolton (1682-1730) as shepherdess, by James Maubert. Henrietta Street was named in her honour. Vicereine 1717-1720. She was the daughter of James Crofts (Scott), 1st and last Duke of Monmouth, illegitimate son of King Charles II. She married Charles Paulet, 2nd Duke of Bolton.

The Archiseek website quotes The Irish Builder, July 15 1893:

This magnificent mansion was erected about the year 1725, by the Rt. Hon. Luke Gardiner, grandfather of the 1st Viscount Mountjoy, ancestor of the Earl of Blesinton, and may be described as the Manor House of Henrietta-street. The reception-rooms are seven in number, and the cornices and ceilings are finished in a rich and antique style. 

The ball-room is a noble apartment; the architraves of the doors and windows are adorned with fluted Corinthian columns sur mounted by pediments. The drawing-room, to the left of the ante-room on the first floor, possesses a beautifully carved oak cornice, the effect of which is peculiarly striking. The front staircase is spacious and lofty; the walls are panelled, and the ceiling is handsomely ornamented. The principal dining room, looking into the garden, is square, with fine stuccoed ceiling, and walls in square panels stuccoed, the squares broken off at the angles by curves. The architraves of the parlour doors are as rich as carving could make them. There is a mock key-stone or block of wood that for elegant and elaborate carving in relief cannot be surpassed. The stuccoed ceilings are in panels with enriched fillets, quite palatial, and only in the ball room are seen arabesques in the centre. The window of the ball-room, which is over the porte-cochère, has three opes, the centre ope being arched, and this is the only architectural adornment externally. Mountjoy House had originally a fine porte-cochère, or covered carriage entry, arched with cut stone, on the park side, next to the present King’s Inns buildings.” [1]

Open House, 2011, 10 Henrietta Street
10 Henrietta Street, photograph from UCD Archive [ https://digital.ucd.ie/view/ivrla:31546 ]

See also the wonderfully informative book, The Best Address in Town: Henrietta Street, Dublin and its First Residents 1720-80 by Melanie Hayes, published by Four Courts Press, Dublin 8, 2020.

Open House, 2011, 10 Henrietta Street
Open House, 2011, 10 Henrietta Street
Open House, 2011, 10 Henrietta Street
Open House, 2011, 10 Henrietta Street. What looks like stucco work in this room is actually papier mache.

Robert O’Byrne tells us about the use of papier-mache instead of plaster for some decorative work. He tells us:

When the house was first built, it featured a double-height entrance containing stairs leading to the first-floor. However, some years after the death of Luke Gardiner in 1755 his son Charles reordered this space to create a single-storey entrance hall, behind which a new staircase hall was instated. Probably around the same time a number of rooms were given new ceilings in the rococo manner. These decorations are important because in the majority of cases they are made not of plaster but papier-mâché. The use of this medium is unusual but not unique – a number of other examples survive elsewhere in the city and in Carton, County Kildare – but it seems strange to find it here. One of the attractions of papier-mâché was its relative cheapness (relative to stuccowork, that is) but the Gardiners were certainly affluent to afford anything they wished. On the other hand, its great merit is easier (and cleaner) installation than plaster, so perhaps this is why papier-mâché was preferred for the redecoration of existing rooms. 

It was not used, on the other hand, for the saloon, or ballroom (now used as a chapel), which in its present form looks to have been either added or extended at the time when Charles Gardiner was re-fashioning other spaces in the house.” [2]

Open House, 2011, Henrietta St, window by Harry Clarke

9. 12 Henrietta Street, Dublin – private, sometimes open during Open House Dublin

12 Henrietta Street, October 2022.
12 Henrietta Street, Open House October 2019.

12 Henrietta Street was first occupied by Sir Gustavus Hume (1677-1731), MP, privy councillor and courtier to King George I. He was the third son of the prominent Ulster-Scot Sir John Hume of Castle Hume (2nd Baronet), County Fermanagh and of Sidney, daughter and co-heiress of James Hamilton of Manor Hamilton, County Leitrim and became 3rd Baronet of Castle Hume (now demolished) when his father died as his two elder brothers predeceased their father. Castle Hume was architect Richard Castle’s first known commission in Ireland. It was pulled down in the 1830s and the materials reused to build Ely Lodge nearby.

view from window of 12 Henrietta Street, Dublin, 2019.
12 Henrietta Street, Open House October 2019.

The National Inventory of Architectural Heritage tells us it is:

Terraced three-bay three-storey house over exposed basement, built c.1730, by Luke Gardiner as pair with No. 11, heavily remodelled c.1780…This house was built as a pair with No. 11, possibly to the designs of Edward Lovett Pearce. It was initially leased to Henry Boyle, Speaker of the House of Commons. Later, the house was leased to the 2nd Earl of Shannon in 1780, and subsequently gutted with the removal of a floor to provide a truly grand piano nobile. The building retains most of the interior detailing from that remodelling including stucco decoration by Charles Thorp, with remnants from the earlier scheme. The house has been undergoing a painstaking programme of conservation works and forms an important part of what has been described as ‘Dublin’s Street of Palaces’ while the ongoing conservation work will contribute to the improving fortunes of this remarkable streetscape. Laid out by Luke Gardiner in the 1720s, Henrietta Street is a short cul-de-sac containing the finest early Georgian houses in the city. It was named after Henrietta Crofts, the third wife of Charles Paulet, 2nd Duke of Bolton and Lord Lieutenant in 1717-21, the street developed in a piecemeal fashion and set the trends of scale and design in domestic architecture.”

See also the wonderfully informative book, The Best Address in Town: Henrietta Street, Dublin and its First Residents 1720-80 by Melanie Hayes, published by Four Courts Press, Dublin 8, 2020.

In 1733 William Stewart (1709-1769), 3rd Viscount Mountjoy and later 1st Earl of Blessington, moved to 12 Henrietta Street.

12 Henrietta Street, Open House October 2019.
12 Henrietta Street, Open House October 2019.
12 Henrietta Street, Open House October 2019.
12 Henrietta Street, Dublin, 2019.
12 Henrietta Street, Open House October 2019.
12 Henrietta Street, Dublin, 2019.
12 Henrietta Street, Open House October 2019.
12 Henrietta Street, Dublin, 2019.
12 Henrietta Street, Open House October 2019.
12 Henrietta Street, Open House October 2019.
12 Henrietta Street, Open House October 2019.
12 Henrietta Street, Open House October 2019.
12 Henrietta Street, Open House October 2019.
12 Henrietta Street, Dublin, 2019.
12 Henrietta Street, Dublin, 2019.

10. 14 Henrietta Street, Dublin (July 2013 Heritage Week)

https://14henriettastreet.ie

This house is now a museum. See my entry https://irishhistorichouses.com/2020/06/06/covid-19-lockdown-20km-limits-and-places-to-visit-in-dublin/

See also the wonderfully informative book, The Best Address in Town: Henrietta Street, Dublin and its First Residents 1720-80 by Melanie Hayes, published by Four Courts Press, Dublin 8, 2020.

14 Henrietta Street, 2022.
14 Henrietta Street, Dublin, July 2013.
14 Henrietta Street, Dublin, July 2013.
14 Henrietta Street, Dublin, July 2013.
14 Henrietta Street, Dublin, July 2013.
14 Henrietta Street, Dublin, July 2013.
14 Henrietta Street, Dublin, July 2013.
14 Henrietta Street, Dublin, July 2013.
14 Henrietta Street, Dublin, July 2013.
14 Henrietta Street, Dublin, July 2013.

11. Iveagh House (80 and 81 St. Stephen’s Green) – Department of Foreign Affairs (Open House 2014)

Iveagh House, St Stephen’s Green, October 2014. Portland stone facade (1866) by James Franklin Fuller (1835-1924) disguises an early eighteenth century townhouse by Richard Castle (d. 1751) for Robert Clayton (1695-1758), Bishop of Cork and Ross. The original house, three windows wide, is on the left of the portico.
Iveagh House, St Stephen’s Green, the original owner, Robert Clayton (1695-1758), Bishop of Cork and Ross.

The Archiseek website tells us:

Iveagh House is now the Department of Foreign Affairs as it was donated to the Irish State by the Guinness family in 1939. Originally two houses, nos 80/81 St Stephen’s Green, no 80 was originally designed by Richard Cassels [also spelled “Castle”] in 1736. After both houses were bought by Benjamin Guinness in 1862, he acted as his own architect and produced the current house. 

“The Dublin Builder, February 1 1866: ‘In this number we give a sketch of the town mansion of Mr. Benjamin Lee Guinness, M.P , now in course of erection in Stephen’s Green, South, the grounds of which run down to those of the Winter Garden. As an illustration so very quiet and unpretending a front is less remarkable as a work of architectural importance than from the interest which the name of that well-known and respected owner gives it, and from whose own designs it is said to have been built. The interior of the mansion promises to be of a very important and costly character, and to this we hope to have the pleasure of returning on a future occasion when it is more fully advanced. The works, we believe, have been carried out by the Messrs. Murphy of St. Patrick’s Cathedral notoriety, under Mr. Guinness’s own immediate directions, without the intervention of any professional architect.’ “

Iveagh House, St Stephen’s Green, October 2014.

The building was donated to the Irish government by Benjamin Guinness’s grandson Rupert, the 2nd Earl of Iveagh, in 1939 and was renamed Iveagh House.

Iveagh House, St Stephen’s Green, October 2014.
Iveagh House, St Stephen’s Green
Iveagh House, St Stephen’s Green
Iveagh House, St Stephen’s Green, October 2014. Painting by De Chirico.
Iveagh House, St Stephen’s Green, October 2014.
Iveagh House, St Stephen’s Green, October 2014.
Iveagh Gardens, the part kept by the Guinness’s as part of Iveagh House
Mahogany doorframe and door, Iveagh House, Stephen’s Green. The architect took advantage of the tax on mahogany not imposed in Ireland
The Sleeping Faun, bought by the Guinness’s, for almost the same price as the house! Donated by the Guinnesses along with the house to the state.
Iveagh House, St Stephen’s Green, medieval wooden carving, picturing Homer’s Illiad scenes.
Iveagh House, St Stephen’s Green
Iveagh House, St Stephen’s Green, “Modesty.”
Iveagh House, St Stephen’s Green, original fireplace.
Iveagh House, St Stephen’s Green, originally the study.
Iveagh House, St Stephen’s Green, originally the study. Medieval wood carvings of scenes from Homer’s Illiad, and crest of Lord Iveagh who donated the house to the state. Original fireplace.
Iveagh House, St Stephen’s Green, The Music Room.
The Music room ceiling, in Iveagh House.
Iveagh House, St Stephen’s Green
Iveagh House, St Stephen’s Green, probably originally the room of the Lady of the house
Iveagh House ballroom
Iveagh House ballroom.
Original curtains and seats in ballroom in Iveagh House.
Iveagh House ballroom.
Fireplace built for ballroom in Iveagh House to host a Royal visit to the Guinness’s, the room was built specially to have the guests, for £30,000. JFK was hosted at a reception here and had his picture taken in front of the fireplace, and his daughter Caroline Kennedy had her picture taken there years later.
Ballroom stucco in Iveagh House, made from moulds but then finished by hand to make look like fully hand-done.
Minstrals’ gallery in Iveagh House ballroom, made of the new at the time material, aluminium.
Ceiling of Iveagh house ballroom, in Wedgewood blue.

12. Iveagh Trust Apartment, Iveagh Buildings (Open House 2014)

Iveagh Trust flat, Iveagh Trust buildings on Patrick Street, Dublin 8.

The Iveagh Trust buildings were commissioned by the Earl of Iveagh in 1901. The architects were Joseph and Smithem, London architects. The centrepiece of the buildings, built to house people who lived in the slums about St. Patrick’s cathdral, was the Iveagh Baths.

Iveagh Trust flat, Iveagh Trust buildings on Patrick Street, Dublin 8.
Iveagh Trust flat, Iveagh Trust buildings on Patrick Street, Dublin 8.
The range, in Iveagh Trust flat, Iveagh Trust buildings on Patrick Street, Dublin 8.
Iveagh Trust flat, Iveagh Trust buildings on Patrick Street, Dublin 8.
Iveagh Trust flat, Iveagh Trust buildings on Patrick Street, Dublin 8.
Iveagh Trust flat, Iveagh Trust buildings on Patrick Street, Dublin 8.
Iveagh Trust flat, Iveagh Trust buildings on Patrick Street, Dublin 8.
Iveagh Trust flat, Iveagh Trust buildings on Patrick Street, Dublin 8. Child of Prague and St. Christopher in the alcove.
Iveagh Trust flat, Iveagh Trust buildings on Patrick Street, Dublin 8.
Iveagh Trust flat, Iveagh Trust buildings on Patrick Street, Dublin 8. Religion was more dominant in peoples’ lives in those days than it is generally in Irish people today!
Iveagh Trust flat, Iveagh Trust buildings on Patrick Street, Dublin 8.
Iveagh Trust flat, Iveagh Trust buildings on Patrick Street, Dublin 8, picture of Nelly and her family.
Iveagh Trust flat, Iveagh Trust buildings on Patrick Street, Dublin 8.

13. Mansion House, Dawson Street, Dublin – private, home of the Mayor of Dublin (Open House 2015)

Mansion House, Dublin 2015. Originally there were statues along the parapet, which was later balustraded.

The Buildings of Ireland website featured the Mansion House as one of its Buildings of the Month, and tells us that The Mansion House, Dawson Street, is the oldest freestanding house in the city and the only surviving mayoral residence in Ireland.

The Mansion House owes its origins to Joshua Dawson (1660-1725), a member of the Guild of Merchants and at the time the second-wealthiest man in Ireland, who in 1705 purchased a tract of poor marshy ground east of the medieval core of Dublin and within two years had laid out a new street which he named Dawson Street. Work on a suitable townhouse began in 1710 and it is clear that the house was intended as the centrepiece of the new street.

The house, a rare example of a Queen Anne-style house, was substantially refronted in 1851 when the original brick finish was plastered, the windows were given robust classical frames, and the parapet was remodelled about a central pediment carrying the Coat of Arms of the City. The elaborate cast-iron canopy (1886) was designed by Daniel J. Freeman (1856/7-1902), City Architect (fl. 1879-93).

Mansion House, March 2015.
The Drawing Room, Mansion House, March 2015. It contains portraits of Earl Whitworth, the Earls of Hardwicke and Westmoreland, John Foster the last Speaker of the House of Commons and Alderman Alexander [3].

The death of Queen Anne in 1714 abruptly disrupted Dawson’s ambitious plans. Fearing that her successor would not be so favoured towards him, Dawson agreed on the 18th of May, 1715, to sell the house to Dublin Corporation at a cost of £3,500 in addition to a yearly ground rent of forty shillings and a loaf of double-refined sugar weighing six pounds due each Christmas. As a condition of the sale, Dawson agreed to build an additional room which could be used for civic receptions: the now-famous Oak Room. 

The Oak Room was the venue of the annual City Ball throughout the eighteenth century. On such occasions the Lord Mayor dispensed generous hospitality, aided in no small part by a yearly grant of twenty thousand oysters from the civic oyster beds. The Oak Room continues to play a central role in the life of the Mansion House today. [4] It contains portraits of Charles II, George II, Duke of Cumberland and the Duke of Richmond.

The Oak room contains crests for all of the Mayors.
Mayor John Gormley’s crest – the mayors pick symbols that they feel are suitable to represent them.
I don’t know what this means for Mayor Moyers!
Mansion House, March 2015. The “Sheriff’s Room” with portraits of the Duke of Northumberland, Lord Townshend, John Duke of Bedford and Aldermen Sankey, Thorpe and Manders. [3]
Mansion House, March 2015.

The extension of the property continued well into the nineteenth century and included the Round Room completed in just six weeks in 1821 for the reception of King George IV. Designed by John Semple (d.1840) in the “exotic” style, an apparent nod to the monarch’s Hindu-Gothic Brighton Pavilion, it was remodelled 1892 by J. G. Ashlin, and was the venue for the first sitting of Dáil Éireann in January 1919.

The improvement of the Mansion House continued into the early twentieth century when, in anticipation of a royal visit by Queen Victoria, new ceilings were installed in the entrance hall and drawing room to designs by Charles James McCarthy (c.1857-1947), City Architect (fl. 1893-1921). The stained glass window over the principal staircase dates from the same period and carries the signature of Joshua Clarke and Sons of North Frederick Street. The Dublin City coat-of-arms again features as the centrepiece in a frame including the shields of the four provinces of Ireland and the names of prominent supporters of Home Rule. Topped and tailed by a Garland of Peace and a Cornucopia of Prosperity, the window is today known as “The Peace Window”. 

14. Marsh’s Library, Dublin (2013)

Marsh’s Library 1975, photograph from National Library and Archives.[5]

Marsh’s Library was built in 1701, designed by William Robinson who was surveyor general from 1670-1700, and who also designed the Royal Hospital Kilmainham. The Library was set up as the first public library in Ireland, by Archbishop Narcissus Marsh (1638-1713).

Narcissus Marsh, Provost of Trinity ca. 1690, then Archbishop of Dublin.
Entrance to Marsh’s library.

The interior of the library remains unchanged from when it was set up. It is no longer a public library, unfortunately, as the books are too delicate for general handling, but one can request to look up books in the catalogue, and it operates as a sort of museum open to the public for a fee. It contains dark oak bookcases topped with lettered gables and a mitre. The library contains the original reading cages – a reader would be locked in so that he or she could not steal the books.

Marsh’s Library, Feb 26, 2012
Marsh’s Library librarians. The first Librarian, Elias Bouhereau, was a Huguenot refugee from France.
Garden of Marsh’s library, Heritage Week tour 2013.
Garden of Marsh’s library, Heritage Week tour 2013.
Garden of Marsh’s library, Heritage Week tour 2013.
Garden of Marsh’s Library, Heritage week tour 2013.

15. 10 Mill Street, Dublin (Open House 2017)

10 Mill Street in October 2010 before renovations.

10 Mill Street was built in the 1720s by the Brabazon family, Earls of Meath. In the early 19th century it was converted into a school by the Christian Brothers and later used by several charitable groups. It was remodelled in 1894 by architect George P. Beater as a Methodist mission house and school. [Archiseek]

10 Mill Street in October 2010 before renovations.

After renovations:

10 Mill Street after renovations.
10 Mill Street after renovations.
Inside 10 Mill Street, Dublin 8. Original panelling, paint only partially stripped.
Inside 10 Mill Street, Dublin 8. Panelling restored.
Inside 10 Mill Street, Dublin 8. Fireplace left in situ.
Inside 10 Mill Street, Dublin 8. Old piece of banisters.
Inside 10 Mill Street, Dublin 8. Panelling made to look like the original. Staircase suspended from ceiling.
Inside 10 Mill Street, Dublin 8.

14. Pigeonhouse Power Station and hotel (2021)

The old Pigeonhouse Hotel.
The old Pigeonhouse Power Station.

15. Rates Office, formerly Newcomen Bank, Dublin (2013)

Rates Office, formerly Newcomen Bank, photograph by Robert French, Lawrence Collection National Library of Ireland, flickr constant commons.

Built in 1781 by Thomas Ivory. The original building was half the size, and Ivory’s half was built in mirror image with a portico built to link the two halves. [archiseek]

In 1722 Simon (or William?) Gleadowe (d. 21 August 1807) married into the Newcomen family of Carriglass House in County Longford and took their name. He started the Newcomen Bank. He was knighted to become 1st Baronet Newcomen in 1781 and elected to the Irish Parliament. He voted for the Act of Union and his wife Charlotte was rewarded with a Peerage to become Viscountess Newcomen. Their son inherited her title and became Thomas Gleadowe-Newcomen, 2nd Viscount Newcomen (1776-1825), and he also inherited the Newcomen Bank. The bank had a series of failures and closed in 1825, and Thomas shot himself and died in his office. After his death the title became extinct.

The Open House description tells us:

“An elegant block in Portland stone, the building stands at the corner of Cork Hill and Castle Street, doubled in length on Cork Hill by an 1862 addition. Ivory’s original plan comprised three rooms with a large stair hall, with the site’s irregular boundaries concealed by the use of oval rooms. The interior has been recently renovated and retains fine decoration, with highlights including the larger first-floor oval room and the highly decorated ceiling over the stair hall.”

City Hall, opposite the Rates Office.
Doorway in Rates Office shows the thickness of the wall, and the oval shape of the room.

16. Royal Irish Academy Dublin (2013)

17. Royal College of Physicians, Dublin (2013)

Royal College of Physicians, Heritage Week 2013.

Designed by William George Murray who also designed the Hibernian Bank. It was built in 1861 to replace the College of Physicians previous premises which had burned down at this location. The facade eroded and was completely replaced 100 years later in 1960. A description in the 1862 Irish Builder describes it:

Entering from the portico, the outer hall or vestibule leads by a spacious flight of five steps to the inner hall, in which the main staircase is placed. On the right and left of this hall are the entrances to the council and examination rooms, registrar’s apartments, back stairs, reading room etc. The college hall is at the rere of the building, and is entered from the first landing of the main staircase, which here divides into a double flight, returning to the right and left.

This noble apartment, 58 feet by 30 feet and 30 feet high… is divided into five bays in length and three in breadth by Corinthian pilasters elevated on a panelled daedo, and surmounted by the ordinary frieze and cornice from which springs a quadrant coved ceiling with semi-circular arches over each bay groined into it. This hall is lighted by five lofty windows at the rere, and also three circular dome-lights in the ceiling…

The room with the ceremonial mace also contained glass cases with memorabilia and diary of Napoleon from his days on St. Helena, as his physician was an Irishman. He gave his physician his toothbrush and diary as a memorial, telling him the diary would make him rich! He chose this physician on hearing him talk. The physician agreed to be the doctor but said he would not spy for the British. They became friends. He had to bleed Napoleon several times as Napoleon fell ill, and the lancet used is also in the glass case.

Royal College of Physicians, Heritage Week 2013. Casey, p. 482: “The stair hall is an impressive double-height space with a coved and traceried ceiling and central lantern. Fine cast-iron lamp standards and balustrade to the stair. Corinthian pilaster order to the upper walls, beneath which are extraordinary shallow pilaster strips with odd bases which must surely be a C20 intervention. At the head of the stairs on the first-floor landing paired Corinthian columns flank the balustrade and a central [483] door to the library, a plain five-bay room which fills the entire street frontage, originally contrived as a separate library and museum.”
Ceiling of Royal College of Physicians, Heritage Week 2013.
Patrick Dun’s Library, Royal College of Physicians, Kildare St, Dublin – celebrating its 300th year in 2013!
Patrick Dun’s Library, Royal College of Physicians, Kildare St, Dublin, Heritage Week 2013.
Patrick Dun’s Library, Royal College of Physicians, Kildare St, Dublin, Heritage Week 2013.

18. Royal College of Surgeons, Dublin (Open House 2011)

William Dease sculpture, one of the founders of the Royal College of Surgeons, Open House, 2011, Royal College of Surgeons.

The Royal College of Surgeons was built in two phases, first by architect Edward Parke, who built what is now the last three bays on the south side and five bays deep on York Street. This was subsumed later by architect William Murray, who added four bays to the north and moved the pediment to the new centre of the building, on St. Stephen’s Green. The facade has large round-headed windows separated by freestanding columns. The pediment has the royal arms, and is topped with three statues: Athena (goddess of Wisdom and War), Asclepius (god of Medicine) and Hygiea (Goddess of Health), all by John Smyth [Archiseek]. It has a rusticated basement storey.

The interior, as listed in Lewis’s guide in 1837, contains a large board room, a library, an apartment for general meetings, an examination hall, several committee rooms and offices, lecture theatres and three museums, two of which have galleries.

There is a top-lit gallery with Adamesque plasterwork.

Open House, 2011, Royal College of Surgeons.

Open House, 2011, Royal College of Surgeons.
Open House, 2011, Royal College of Surgeons.
Open House, 2011, Royal College of Surgeons.
Open House, 2011, Royal College of Surgeons.
Open House, 2011, Royal College of Surgeons.
Open House, 2011, Royal College of Surgeons.
Open House, 2011, Royal College of Surgeons.
Open House, 2011, Royal College of Surgeons.

Open House, 2011, Royal College of Surgeons.
My father looks at the fireplace, 2011, Royal College of Surgeons.
Open House, 2011, Royal College of Surgeons.

19. St. Mary’s Abbey, Dublin (Culture Night 2012)

The Archiseek website tells us that in the early 1880s, seven feet below street level, under a bakery, the chapter house of St. Mary’s Abbey was discovered. St. Mary’s Abbey was a Cistercian Abbey founded by the Benedictine monks in 1139. It was dissolved in 1530 and fell into disrepair and its existence is reflected in the street names surrouding it: Mary Street and Abbey Street. The Chapter House is the only part remaining, and was built in 1190! [6]

The Chapter House of St Mary’s Abbey, which was built in 1190.

It was in the Chapter House, which could be rented out, that at a meeting of the Privy Council in 1534, “Silken Thomas” FitzGerald objected to the King, who had imprisoned his father. Thomas thought his father had been executed.

20. Tailor’s Guild Hall, Dublin (Culture Night 2013)

Tailor’s Guild Hall, 2013

Tailor’s Hall was built in 1706 and is the only Guild Hall from the medieval guilds still in existence in Dublin. It is two storeys over basement and the hall inside is lit by tall round-headed windows on both sides, and has two floors of smaller rooms. It is now the headquarters for An Taisce. It was originally the meeting hall for the Guild of Merchant Tailors, from 1706-1841.

It was used in 1792 as the meeting place for the Catholic Committee during their campaign against Penal Law, and for this the building earned the nickname of “Back Lane Parliament.” Later still, it was used as a meeting place for the United Irishmen around 1798.

From Christine Casey, The Buildings of Ireland: Dublin, 2005, p. 367:
1703-1707, Richard Mills overseer. The Tailors’ Guild Hall is a tall shallow red brick building with a steep roof and dormer windows, a large gabled chimneystack and stair compartment projecting from the rear or N. wall. The entrance front is the long S elevation, reached by a stone arch and forecourt from Back Lane. In the 18th century the Hall was concealed behind houses on High Street and Back Lane and preceded only by the narrow arched pathway and a basement area. This unusual sequestered position is explained by the fact that the site was formerly occupied by a Jesuit chapel and college, endowed in 1629 by the Countess of Kildare. Seized by the Crown in 1630, it was subsequently repossessed by Lord and Lady Kildare and returned to the Jesuits who remained here for an unknown period prior to 1706…Tailors’ Hall is substantially early 18C. However, curiosities in the design and [p.368] structure suggest that it may incorporate something of the fabric of the 17C chapel.

The most striking feature of the facade is its asymmetry. Four tall narrow round-headed windows lighting the assembly hall fill almost two-thirds of the facade. To their right the facade is of two storeys and three bays with the entrance on the left next to the hall framed by an elegant rusticated limestone door surround of 1770. The basic arrangement reflects a pragmatic medieval-based system of hall and upper chamber, common in London livery halls of the late C17… A granite base-mould divides the brick masonry of the principal floor from the basement walling, which is largely of Calp with a band of brick forming the slightly cambered heads of the basement windows.”

Tailor’s Guild Hall, Heritage Week 2013. Twisted barley bannisters, hand carved, turned on lathe.
Casey, p. 368: “the finest feature of the interior is the staircase, which is an elaborate open-well type with a low moulded handrail, barley sugar banisters and later square newels.”
Tailor’s Guild Hall, Heritage Week 2013: p. 368, Casey: “an elegant double-height brightly lit hall with a fine early C18 Ionic reredos at the W end bearing the name of guild masters, a handsome marble chimneypiece…and at the east end a bowed draught lobby with a curious Gothic pelmet and above it a Late Georgian Neoclassical wrought-iron balcony reached from the room above the entrance hall.”
Tailor’s Guild Hall, Heritage Week 2013.

21. Trinity Innovation Centre, former Bank, Foster Place, Dublin (2013)

Innovation Centre of Trinity, Foster Place.

Before the formation of AIB (Allied Irish Bank), this was known as the Royal Bank. A Neo-Classical porch was added by George Papworth in 1850. The banking hall was added by Charles Geoghegan in 1859 at the rear of the building. It has a coffered barrel vaulted space top-lit and supported by cast iron Corinthian columns. The building has a double-height entrance hall. The bank closed in 2002 and the building is now owned by Trinity College Dublin.

Innovation Centre of Trinity, Foster Place.

The description of the day’s event tells us:

“Behind a neat stucco facade (with a neo-classical porch added by George Papworth circa 1850) and a double-height entrance hall, the interior includes what has been described as Dublin’s finest Victorian banking hall. A curving mahogany counter wraps most of the floor area, previously as a barrier between the bank clerks and customers. The space is in excellent condition, lit from above by a coffered and glazed barrel vault, supported by elegant cast-iron columns. For those who love pattern and ornament, the friezes and the plasterwork on the columns and their capitals will be particularly enjoyable.”

Open House 2013, Innovation Centre in Trinity College Dublin.

[1] https://www.archiseek.com/2010/1730-no-10-henrietta-street-dublin/

[2] https://theirishaesthete.com/2017/03/20/shedding-light-on-a-subject/ 

[3] https://www.archiseek.com/2010/1715-mansion-house-dawson-street-dublin/

[4] https://www.buildingsofireland.ie/building-of-the-month/the-mansion-house-dawson-street-dublin-2/ 

[5] National Library and Archives digital repository.

[6] https://www.archiseek.com/2010/st-marys-abbey-chapter-house-marys-abbey-dublin/

Martello Tower, Portrane, Co. Dublin

Contact: Terry Prone

Tel: 01-6449700

Open dates in 2022: March 6-Sept 26, Sat & Sun, National Heritage Week, Aug 13-21, 9am-1pm. Booking essential.

Fee: adult €5, student €4, OAP €1. Kids free.

Martello Tower, Portrane, April 2022.

Terry was very welcoming to her home, North Tower Number 7 of Dublin bay’s Martello towers. She showed us around inside and her friend, gardener and Martello tower expert Bryan gave us a tour outside. You may recognise the tower from RTE television show “Home of the Year.”

First, Terry told us a bit about the history of the Martello towers of Dublin. The Martello towers were built to protect Ireland from French invasion from Napoleon’s army. Twenty four towers were built around the bay of Dublin, and twenty-one are still standing. There are also some in Limerick and Cork. No two towers are exactly alike. Some are larger, built for larger cannons. Some of the Martello towers have cellars and some do not.

This particular tower was built in 1805-6. In 1793, under the command of Vice Admiral John Jervis, a tower in Corsica, Cape Mortella was besieged, and he noted with great interest how well it withstood a battery of cannonballs. After three days the English landed ashore and took it by force. Jervis realised that the squat rounded shape of the tower and the thickness of its walls allowed it to withstand the attack. The British copied the design for their own defensive towers, but changed the name and called them “Martello” towers. The  walls facing the sea are nine feet thick and on the land side eight feet thick. The Martellos around Dublin bay are built in the line of sight of each other, with the objective of ensuring the arc of canon fire from one would meet or overlap that from its neighbours.

The view from the front of the tower.

Napoleon never came to Ireland, however, so the towers were never used to defend the coast. Terry told us that the British admiralty took the land to build the towers as they didn’t have time to locate the owners of the land. The towers were each built of local stone.

The marker beside the boundary wall is a marker declaring the land in the name of the Crown. It must have been installed when the land was taken in order to build the tower.

This tower came into private ownership in the 1920s. It has been altered to create a family home. Before Terry and her husband purchased the tower, it was owned by bookseller Derek Hughes of Hughes & Hughes bookstores. Earlier owners named Ian Coulhane, Walter Douglas and Fred Thorpe broke out walls on four sides of the tower and installed extensions at each.

The cannon would have been placed on the roof of the tower. Martello towers were built of a height suitable for the cannon range, and can be up to forty feet high. The cannons were able to rotate around a track to fire 360 degrees around the tower, and it took twelve soldiers to operate the cannon. It was planned that the soldiers would maintain a 24 hour lookout, taking it in two shifts, with approximately 24 men working and living in the tower. That never happened, although some invalided soldiers did work in Tom and Terry’s tower.

The top of the tower.
These iron rings around the inner walls of the tower at the top were the rings used to secure the cannon into place.
The tower also has a machicolation, another defensive structure through which things could be dropped. This one still has fine corbels supporting it.
The view from the top of the tower.
The view from the top of the tower.
The view from the top of the tower: Lambay Island, which is also another Section 482 property which I look forward to visiting.

We entered the house through a door into the kitchen. The kitchen had previously been a two-car garage.

Terry in her kitchen with her cats, with Bryan and Stephen.

Terry showed us around her tower, pointing out where she and her husband made changes and renovations, where previous owners made changes, and where one can see original features of the tower. Her son Anton Savage, a radio and tv presenter, read up all about Martello towers and made lots of discoveries in his own home.

The kitchen leads into the tower itself. On our right was a spiral staircase, which is built inside the walls of the tower. The spiral staircase takes its shape from ancient tower houses which used spiral stairs for defence, narrow and built in a way so right-handed swordsmen on the second-floor would have the advantage over invaders coming up the stairs, who would be forced to fight using their left hands.

The spiral stairs are inside the walls of the tower.
In this picture you can see the width of the tower walls.
Looking up along the wall to the ceiling, one can see the “intramural tunnels” through which cannonballs were winched up.

The inside of the round tower has two storeys, but the floor in the centre has been removed to create a beautiful double-height gallery of two floors of mahogany bookcases.

The beams between the ground and first floor are original.
Looking back from the round tower toward the kitchen.

When Terry and her husband Tom removed the layer that had been applied inside the stone walls to expose the original stone, they discovered a fireplace. They installed a stove.

When renovating the ground flooring, they discovered a hole in the floor, revealing what must have been a cistern with enough space to store water for twenty five men for twenty five days. Terry and Tom had the space glassed over to create a feature in the floor, rather like the floor in our local Lidl, which has a similar feature in the floor revealing the remains of an 11th century house and another revealing an 18th century ‘pit trap’ associated with the stage workings of the former Aungier Street Theatre, where an actor could disappear beneath the stage or reappear like magic.

The glassed over floor revealing the stone cistern.

Instead of doors, Terry’s rooms are divided off by heavy red curtains.

On the ground floor an extension built on to one side contains the dining room/sitting room.

You can just about see how thick the tower walls are, seeing the hall which breaks through into the dining/sitting room.
The sitting room, from the outside, behind Stephen and Bryan.

Also off the ground floor is the bathroom with a magnificent view from a bath, which has steps leading up to it.

The magnificent view from the bath. The curve of the bath matching the curve of the wall must be a beautiful coincidence!
Terry leads us from the bathroom, and you can see right from the bathroom through the tower to the kitchen.

The bedroom is above the bathroom, and has another gorgeous picture window.

A previous owner, Walter Douglas, had the garden terraced.

The boat house, which was installed for the Preventative Water Guard to catch smugglers.
The Rocket House on the property is where Terry and her husband lived for a year while the
tower was being renovated. Rocket houses were where rockets were stored that were used to
carry ropes to ships in distress.
I love the fish pond.

Places to visit and stay in County Dublin

On the map above:

blue: places to visit that are not section 482

purple: section 482 properties

red: accommodation

yellow: less expensive accommodation for two

orange: “whole house rental” i.e. those properties that are only for large group accommodations or weddings, e.g. 10 or more people.

green: gardens to visit

grey: ruins

Carlow, Dublin, Kildare, Kilkenny, Laois, Longford, Louth, Meath, Offaly, Westmeath, Wexford and Wicklow are the counties that make up the Leinster region.

For places to stay, I have made a rough estimate of prices at time of publication:

€ = up to approximately €150 per night for two people sharing (in yellow on map);

€€ – up to approx €250 per night for two;

€€€ – over €250 per night for two.

For a full listing of accommodation in big houses in Ireland, see my accommodation page: https://irishhistorichouses.com/accommodation/

Dublin City and County

See my entry Covid-19 lockdown, 20km limits, and places to visit in Dublin:

irishhistorichouses.com/2020/06/06/covid-19-lockdown-20km-limits-and-places-to-visit-in-dublin/

1. Airfield, Dundrum, Dublin

2. Aras an Uachtarain, Phoenix Park, Dublin – OPW

3. Ardgillan Castle, Dublin

4. Ashtown Castle, Phoenix Park, Dublin – OPW

5. Bewley’s, 78-79 Grafton Street/234 Johnson’s Court, Dublin 2 – section 482

6. Cabinteely House [formerly Clare Hill, or Marlfield], Cabinteely, Dublin 

7. The Casino at Marino, Dublin – OPW

8. Charlemount House, Parnell Square, Dublin – Hugh Lane gallery

9. Clonskeagh Castle, 80 Whitebean Road, Clonskeagh, Dublin 14 – section 482

10. Colganstown House, Hazelhatch Road, Newcastle, Co. Dublin – section 482

11. Corke Lodge Garden, Shankill, Co. Dublin – section 482

12. Dalkey Castle, Dublin – heritage centre 

13. Doheny & Nesbitt, 4/5 Lower Baggot Street, Dublin 2 – section 482

14. Drimnagh Castle, Dublin

15. Dublin Castle, Dublin – OPW

16. Fahanmura, 2 Knocksina, Foxrock, Dublin 18 – section 482

17. Farm Complex, Toberburr Road, Killeek, St Margaret’s, Co. Dublin – section 482

18. Farmleigh, Phoenix Park, Dublin – OPW

19. Fern Hill, Stepaside, Dublin – gardens open to public

20. Georgian House Museum, 29 Lower Fitzwilliam Street, Merrion Square, Dublin 2 – virtual visit only

21. “Geragh”, Sandycove Point, Sandycove, Co. Dublin – section 482

22. 14 Henrietta Street, Dublin

23. Hibernian/National Irish Bank, 23-27 College Green, Dublin 2 – section 482

24. Howth Castle gardens, Dublin

25. Howth Martello Tower Hurdy Gurdy Radio Museum

26. Knocknagin House, Delvin Bridge, Balbriggan, Co. Dublin – section 482

27. Lambay Castle, Lambay Island, Malahide, Co. Dublin – section 482

28. Lissen Hall, County Dublin – ihh member, check dates, May and June.

29. Malahide Castle, County Dublin

30. Marlay Park, Rathfarnham, County Dublin

31. Martello Tower, Portrane, Co. Dublin – section 482

32. Meander, Westminister Road, Foxrock, Dublin 18 – section 482

33. Irish Architectural Archive, 45 Merrion Square, Dublin

34. MOLI, Museum of Literature Ireland, Newman House, St Stephen’s Green, Dublin

35. Newbridge House, Donabate, County Dublin

36. 11 North Great George’s Street, Dublin 1 – section 482

37. 81 North King Street, Smithfield, Dublin 7 – section 482

38. The Odeon (formerly the Old Harcourt Street Railway Station), 57 Harcourt Street, Dublin 2section 482

39. The Old Glebe, Upper Main Street, Newcastle, Co. Dublin – section 482

40. Powerscourt Townhouse Centre, 59 South William Street, Dublin 2 – section 482

41. Primrose Hill, Very Top of Primrose Lane, Lucan, Co. Dublin – section 482

42. Rathfarnham Castle, Dublin – OPW

43. Royal Hospital Kilmainham (Irish Museum of Modern Art, IMMA) – OPW

44. 10 South Frederick Street, Dublin 2 – Section 482

45. St. Enda’s Park and Pearse Museum, Dublin – OPW

46. St. George’s, St. George’s Avenue, Killiney, Co. Dublin – section 482

47. Swords Castle, Swords, County Dublin.

48. The Church, Junction of Mary’s Street/Jervis Street, Dublin 1 – section 482

49. Tibradden House, Mutton Lane, Rathfarnham, Dublin 16 – section 482

Places to stay, County Dubin:

1. Clontarf Castle, Clontarf, Co Dublin – hotel

2. Finnstown, Lucan, Co Dublin – hotel

3. Harrington Hall, 70 Harcourt St, Saint Peter’s, Dublin 2, D02 HP46

4. Killiney Castle, Killiney, Co Dublin  – Fitzpatrick’s hotel

5. Kilronan Guesthouse, 70 Adelaide Road, Dublin 2

6. Lambay Castle, Lambay Island, Rush, Dublin 

7. Martello Tower, Sutton, Dublin – whole house rental

8. The Merchant House, Temple Bar

9. Merrion Hotel (formerly Mornington House), Merrion Street, Dublin – €€€

10. Merrion Mews, Merrion Square, Dublin € for 5-6

11. Mooreen House, Newlands Cross, Dublin (built 1936) 

12. Number 31, Leeson Close, Dublin 2, D02 CP70

13. Number 11 North Great Georges Street

14. St. Helen’s, Booterstown, Co Dublin – now Radisson Blu Stillorgan hotel 

15. The Cottage, Kiltiernan, Dublin €

16. Tibradden Farm Cottages, Rathfarmham, Dublin 16 € for 4-8

17. Waterloo House, Waterloo Road, Dublin 4 €€

18. The Wilder Townhouse, Dublin 2

Whole House Rental, Dublin:

1. Dalkey Lodge, Barnhill Road, Dalkey, County Dublin – whole house rental

2. Dartry House, Orwell Woods, Dartry, Rathgar, Dublin 6 – whole house rental

3. Luttrellstown Castle, (known for a period as Woodlands), Clonsilla, Co Dublin – whole house? wedding venue

4. Orlagh House, Dublin – whole house rental

Dublin City and County

1. Airfield, Dundrum, Dublin 

https://www.airfield.ie

Situated:
Overend Way, Dundrum, D14 EE77

Access:
Car
Luas
Bike

Open: Wednesday to Sunday September – June | 9:30 am – 5 pm (last entry 4 pm)
7 days a week July & August | 9:30 am – 6 pm (last entry 5 pm)

Admission:

  • Adult €12
  • Senior/ Student/ Youth (18-25) €9
  • Children (Under 18) €6.50
  • Carers & 3 or under FREE

Guided Tour:
Group bookings five days a week by prior arrangement.

Instagram@airfieldgardens

20190410_123353
Airfield House, Dublin, April 2019.

See my entry irishhistorichouses.com/2020/06/06/covid-19-lockdown-20km-limits-and-places-to-visit-in-dublin/

Original home to the Overend family, today Airfield House is an interactive tour and exhibition which brings visitors closer to this admired Dublin family. Here you’ll view family photographs, letters, original clothing and display cases with information on their prize-winning Jersey herd, vintage cars and their much loved Victorian toys and books.

We focus not just on the way of life the family lived at Airfield, but also on their fantastic charitable work for organisations such as St John Ambulance and The Children’s Sunshine Home (now The Laura Lynn Foundation) to name but a few. 

Every Wednesday through to Sunday at 11.30am and then again at 2.30pm we offer visitors guided house tours.

2. Aras an Uachtarain, Phoenix Park, Dublin – OPW

see my OPW entry https://irishhistorichouses.com/2022/01/21/office-of-public-works-properties-dublin/

3. Ardgillan Castle, Balbriggan, Dublin

see my entry https://irishhistorichouses.com/2022/10/15/places-to-visit-in-dublin-ardgillan-castle-balbriggan-county-dublin/

4. Ashtown Castle, Phoenix Park, Dublin – OPW

see my OPW entry https://irishhistorichouses.com/2022/01/21/office-of-public-works-properties-dublin/

5. Bewley’s, 78-79 Grafton Street/234 Johnson’s Court, Dublin 2 – section 482

Harry Clarke window, Bewleys Grafton Street.

Contact: Peter O’ Callaghan
Tel 087-7179367
www.bewleys.com
Open: all year except Christmas Day, 9am-5pm Fee: Free

see my entry on places to visit in Dublin: irishhistorichouses.com/2020/06/06/covid-19-lockdown-20km-limits-and-places-to-visit-in-dublin/

6. Cabinteely House [formerly Clare Hill, or Marlfield], Cabinteely, Dublin https://www.dlrcoco.ie/en/heritage/heritage

There’s a terrific online tour, at https://www.dlrcoco.ie/en/heritage/3d-online-tours-–-heritage-home

see my entry on places to visit in Dublin: irishhistorichouses.com/2020/06/06/covid-19-lockdown-20km-limits-and-places-to-visit-in-dublin/

7. The Casino at Marino, Dublin – OPW

see my OPW entry https://irishhistorichouses.com/2022/01/21/office-of-public-works-properties-dublin/

8. Charlemount House, Parnell Square, Dublin – Hugh Lane gallery

 https://www.hughlane.ie

see my entry on places to visit in Dublin: irishhistorichouses.com/2020/06/06/covid-19-lockdown-20km-limits-and-places-to-visit-in-dublin/

9. Clonskeagh Castle, 80 Whitebean Road, Clonskeagh, Dublin 14 – section 482

contact: Frank Armstrong
Tel: 089-4091645, 087-9787357 

www.clonskeaghcastle.com

Open: Jan 6-9, Feb 6-9, Mar 6-9, Apr 6-9, May 1-8, June 1-8, July 1-8, August 13-22, Sept 1-8, Nov 6-9, 2pm-6pm
Fee: adult/OAP €5, child/student €2.50

see my entry on places to visit in Dublin: irishhistorichouses.com/2020/06/06/covid-19-lockdown-20km-limits-and-places-to-visit-in-dublin/

10. Colganstown House, Hazelhatch Road, Newcastle, Co. Dublin – section 482

Colganstown House, central block main house, and wing on the left hand side of the house, with flanking wall in between containing an arch.

See my write-up:

https://irishhistorichouses.com/2020/05/21/colganstown-house-hazelhatch-road-newcastle-county-dublin/
contact: Lynne Savage Jones
Tel: 087-2206222
Open: Apr 11-17, May 5-27, June 9-11, Aug 13-26, Oct 31, Nov 1-12, 9am-1pm Fee: adult/OAP €10, student/child free.

11. Corke Lodge Garden, Shankill, Co. Dublin – section 482

Postal address Woodbrook, Bray, Co. Wicklow
contact: Alfred Cochrane
Tel: 087-2447006
www.corkelodge.com
Open: June 21-Sept 8, Tue-Sat, National Heritage Week Aug 13-21, 9am-1pm Fee: €8

The house was built in the 1820’s to designs by William Farrell as an Italianate seaside villa. A Mediterranean grove was planted with a Cork tree as its centrepiece. In the remains of this romantic wilderness, the present owner, architect Alfred Cochrane, designed a garden punctuated by a collection of architectural follies salvaged from the demolition of Glendalough House, an 1830’s Tudor revival mansion, built for the Barton family by Daniel Robertson who designed Powerscourt Gardens.”

“There is more fun at Corke Lodge” writes Jane Powers, The Irish Times, where ” the ‘ancient garden’ of box parterres is punctuated by melancholy gothic follies, and emerges eerily from the dense boskage of evergreen oaks, myrtles, and a writhing cork oak tree with deeply corrugated bark. Avenues of cordyline palms and tree ferns, dense planting of sword-leaved New Zealand flax, and clumps of whispering bamboos lend a magical atmosphere to this rampantly imaginative creation.”

12. Dalkey Castle, Dublin – heritage centre https://www.dalkeycastle.com

Believe it or not, I did my Leaving Certificate examinations in this building!! I was extremely lucky and I loved it and the great atmosphere helped me to get the points/grades I wanted!

see my entry on places to visit in Dublin: irishhistorichouses.com/2020/06/06/covid-19-lockdown-20km-limits-and-places-to-visit-in-dublin/

13. Doheny & Nesbitt, 4/5 Lower Baggot Street, Dublin 2 – section 482

contact: Niall Courtney
Tel: 086-0647083, 01-4925395 

www.dohenyandnesbitts.ie

Open: all year, except Christmas Day, Jan, 9am-8pm, Feb-Dec, Mon-Wed, 10am- 11.30pm, Thurs-Sat, 10am-1.30am, Sun, 11am-11.30pm
Fee: Free

see my entry on places to visit in Dublin: irishhistorichouses.com/2020/06/06/covid-19-lockdown-20km-limits-and-places-to-visit-in-dublin/

14. Drimnagh Castle, Dublin

 https://www.drimnaghcastle.org

see my entry on places to visit in Dublin: irishhistorichouses.com/2020/06/06/covid-19-lockdown-20km-limits-and-places-to-visit-in-dublin/

15. Dublin Castle, Dublin – OPW

Dublin Castle.

see my OPW entry https://irishhistorichouses.com/2022/01/21/office-of-public-works-properties-dublin/

16. Fahanmura, 2 Knocksina, Foxrock, Dublin 18 – section 482

contact: Paul Harvey
Tel: Paul 086-3694379
www.fahanmura.ie
Open: May 5-15, June 13-19, July 4-12, Aug 13-25, Sept 10-24, Oct 10-14, 9am-1pm Fee: adult €5, student €2, OAP/child free

see my entry on places to visit in Dublin: irishhistorichouses.com/2020/06/06/covid-19-lockdown-20km-limits-and-places-to-visit-in-dublin/

17. Farm Complex, Toberburr Road, Killeek, St Margaret’s, Co. Dublin – section 482

contact: David Doran
Tel: 086-3821304
OpenJan 1-10, 15-16, 22-23, 29-30, 12 noon 4pm, May 1-8, 14-15, June 4-13, Mon- Fri, 10am-2pm, Sat-Sun, 2pm-6pm, Aug 12-21, 2pm-6pm, Sept 16-25, Mon- Fri, 9.30-1.30pm, Sat-Sun, 2pm-6pm, Oct 22, 29-31, 12 noon-4pm

Fee: adult €6, student/OAP/child €5

see my entry on places to visit in Dublin: irishhistorichouses.com/2020/06/06/covid-19-lockdown-20km-limits-and-places-to-visit-in-dublin/

18. Farmleigh, Phoenix Park, Dublin – OPW

Farmleigh, Dublin.

see my OPW entry. https://irishhistorichouses.com/2022/01/21/office-of-public-works-properties-dublin/

19. Georgian House Museum, 29 Lower Fitzwilliam Street, Merrion Square, Dublin 2 – virtual visit only

http://www.numbertwentynine.ie

20. “Geragh”, Sandycove Point, Sandycove, Co. Dublin – section 482

contact: Gráinne Casey
Tel: 01-2804884
Open: Jan 4-23, May 3-29, Aug 13-21, Sept 1, 12-14, 2pm-6pm Fee: adult €7, OAP/student €4, child free

see my entry on places to visit in Dublin: irishhistorichouses.com/2020/06/06/covid-19-lockdown-20km-limits-and-places-to-visit-in-dublin/

21. 14 Henrietta Street, Dublin – tenement museum https://14henriettastreet.ie

see my entry on places to visit in Dublin: irishhistorichouses.com/2020/06/06/covid-19-lockdown-20km-limits-and-places-to-visit-in-dublin/

22. Hibernian/National Irish Bank, 23-27 College Green, Dublin 2 – section 482

contact: Dan O’Sullivan
Tel: 01-6755100
www.clarendonproperties.ie
Open: all year, except Dec 25, Wed-Fri, 9.30am-8pm, Sun, 11am-7pm, Sat, Mon, Tue, 9.30-7pm

Fee: Free

see my entry on places to visit in Dublin: irishhistorichouses.com/2020/06/06/covid-19-lockdown-20km-limits-and-places-to-visit-in-dublin/

23. Howth Castle gardens, Dublin

see my entry on places to visit in Dublin: irishhistorichouses.com/2020/06/06/covid-19-lockdown-20km-limits-and-places-to-visit-in-dublin/

Howth Castle, Dublin City Library and Archives. [2]

24. Howth Martello Tower Hurdy Gurdy Radio Museum