Office of Public Work sites in Munster: Counties Clare and Limerick

Munster’s counties are Clare, Cork, Kerry, Limerick, Tipperary and Waterford.

I have noticed that an inordinate amount of OPW sites are closed ever since Covid restrictions, if not even before that (as in Emo, which seems to be perpetually closed) [these sites are marked in orange here]. I must write to our Minister for Culture and Heritage to complain.

Clare:

1. Ennis Friary, County Clare

2. Scattery Island, County Clare

Limerick:

3. Askeaton Castle, County Limerick

4. Desmond Castle, Adare, County Limerick – currently closed

5. Desmond Banqueting Hall, Newcastlewest, County Limerick

6. Lough Gur, County Limerick

Clare:

1. Ennis Friary, Abbey Street, Ennis, County Clare:

Ennis Friary, photograph from Ireland’s Content Pool, Photograph by Eamon Ward 2020 for Failte Ireland. [1]

General Enquiries: 065 682 9100, ennisfriary@opw.ie

From the OPW website https://heritageireland.ie/visit/places-to-visit/ennis-friary/:

The O’Briens of Thomond, who once ruled much of north Munster, founded this medieval Franciscan friary. It grew quickly into a huge foundation, with 350 friars and a famed school of 600 pupils by 1375. It was the very last school of Catholic theology to survive the Reformation.

The building contains an exceptional wealth of fifteenth- and sixteenth-century sculptures carved in the local hard limestone, including one of St Francis himself displaying the stigmata. An arch between the nave and transept bears a remarkable image of Christ with his hands bound.

Don’t forget to visit the sacristy, an impressive structure with a ribbed, barrel-vaulted ceiling. Take especial note of the beautiful east window, with its five lancets, as it lights up the chancel.” [2]

Ennis Friary, photograph from Ireland’s Content Pool, Photograph by Eamon Ward 2020 for Failte Ireland. [see 1]

2. Scattery Island, County Clare:

Scattery Island, lies just off Kilrush, on the Shannon Estuary, in County Clare. It is the site of an early Christian settlement founded by St Senan, who built his monastery in the early sixth century. A short boat trip from Kilrush will take you to the island, where you can explore its multi-layered, 1,500-year history including its round tower and six ruined churches. Photograph from Ireland’s Content Pool, by Airswing Media for Failte Ireland. [see 1]

General Information: 087 995 8427, scatteryisland@opw.ie

From the OPW website https://heritageireland.ie/visit/places-to-visit/scattery-island-centre/:

Off the northern bank of the Shannon Estuary lies Scattery Island, the site of an early Christian settlement founded by an extraordinary man.

St Senan, who was born in the area, built his monastery in the early sixth century. It included a mighty round tower, which at 36 metres is one of the tallest in Ireland.

There are six ruined churches on the site too. The Church of the Hill stands on a high spot, the very place where, legend has it, an angel placed Senan so that he could find – and then banish – the terrible sea-monster called the Cathach. It is believed that Senan is buried beside another of the medieval churches.

Scattery was invaded many times over the centuries. The Vikings in particular believed that the monastery held many riches and returned several times to ravage it.

A short boat trip will take you to the island, where you can explore its multi-layered, 1,500-year history.

Limerick:

3. Askeaton Castle, County Limerick:

General information: 087 113 9670, askeatoncastle@opw.ie

From the OPW website https://heritageireland.ie/visit/places-to-visit/askeaton-castle/:

“In the very heart of this County Limerick town stand the impressive remains of a medieval fortress. Askeaton Castle dates from 1199, when William de Burgo built it on a rock in the River Deel.

Over the centuries, the castle proved itself key to the history of Munster. It was the power base of the earls of Desmond after 1348. In 1579 it held out against the English general Sir Nicholas Malby, an incident that helped spark the second Desmond Rebellion.

The banqueting hall is one of the finest medieval secular buildings in Ireland. The tower is partly ruined, but some fine windows and an exquisite medieval fireplace have remained.

The early eighteenth-century building nearby was used as a Hellfire Club. These clubs were rumoured to be dens of excess in which wealthy gentlemen indulged in drink, mock ritual and other nefarious activities.

The Fitzgeralds, Earls of Desmond, held the castle for over 200 years and ruled Munster from it.

4. Desmond Castle, Adare, County Limerick:

General information: 061 396666, info@adareheritagecentre.ie

From the OPW website https://heritageireland.ie/visit/places-to-visit/desmond-castle-adare/:

Desmond Castle Adare epitomises the medieval fortified castle in Ireland. It is strategically situated on the banks of the River Maigue, from where its lords could control any traffic heading to or from the Shannon Estuary.

The castle was built for strength and security. A formidable square keep forms its core; the keep stands within a walled ward surrounded by a moat.

Desmond Castle Adare changed hands several times before becoming a key bastion of the earls of Desmond in the sixteenth century. During the Second Desmond Rebellion, however, it fell to the English after a bloody siege. Cromwellian forces laid waste to the building in 1657, although restorers have since helped to recall its former glory.

Guided tours are now available for anyone who wants to walk in the footsteps of the FitzGeralds and experience their courageous spirit.

This castle belonged to the Earls of Kildare for nearly 300 years until the rebellion in 1536, when it was forfeited and granted to the Earls of Desmond who gave the castle its present name.

5. Desmond Banqueting Hall, Newcastlewest, County Limerick:

General information: 069 77408, desmondhall@opw.ie

Desmond Hall, north facade. Most of what we see today dates from the 15th century. The Desmond Hall consists of a two storey hall over a vault, with tower. It fell into disrepair and was renovated in the 19th century.

An inquisition of lands in 1298 describes the manor of Newcastle as containing the New Castle with buildings inside and outside the walls and the mill of Newcastle.

From the OPW website https://heritageireland.ie/visit/places-to-visit/desmond-castle-newcastlewest/:

Many of Ireland’s surviving medieval halls are in west Limerick. The Desmond Banqueting Hall in Newcastle West is one of the most impressive among them.

It was begun in the thirteenth century by Thomas ‘the Ape’ FitzGerald, so named because of the story that an ape took him from his cradle to the top of Tralee Castle – and delivered him safely back again.

However, most of the spacious, imposing structure was created in the fifteenth century, at the height of the Desmond earls’ power, and used as a venue for frequent and lavish banquets.

The oak gallery, from which musicians would provide a raucous soundtrack for the revelry below, has been fully restored.

The prefix “Fitz” is taken from the Norman-French “fiz” son of. Early members of the family were known by their father’s name, ie. Fitzmaurice or Fitzthomas, but eventually the name settled to be Fitzgerald.

Desmond Hall, south facade.

The Fitzgeralds were Anglo-Norman and came to Ireland at the time of King Henry II in 1169. After the initial colonisation of Ireland in the southwest and east, the Fitzgeralds and some others pushed into the southwest, the information boards tell us.It was only after the death of Donal Mór Ó Brien, King of Thomond, in 1194 that the Fitzgeralds and other Normans took over most of Limerick. By 1215 they held the towns of Cork, Limerick and Waterford and had built a castle in Dungarvan.

An information board at Desmond Hall with a picture of what the Castle would have looked like in about 1450.

The surviving buildings are Desmond Hall and Halla Mór. This is possibly the site of the earliest castle foundations and remnants of the early walls are found underground today. The Desmond hall shows more than one phase of development. Embedded in the exterior of the south wall are vestiges of four early thirteenth century sandstone lancet windows. The fifteenth century development of the hall by the 7th Earl of Desmond introduced many changes including the addition of a projecting tower with small chambers and a stairwell to the Northwest corner.

The Desmond hall shows more than one phase of development. Embedded in the exterior of the south wall are vestiges of four early thirteenth century sandstone lancet windows.

The lower level of the banqueting hall has an excellent display of boards telling us more about the history of the Fitzgerald Earls of Desmond. An old fireplace is set in one wall, it seems to be from 1638.

The visitor centre lies in a building across the courtyard, and another building is being refurbished.

The visitor centre, behind the barn-style doors. This was a coach house and probably built in the time of the tenure by the Courtenay family after 1670s. It was in ruinous condition when it came into care of the state and has been renovated.
Information about the buildings at Newcastle West.
The lower level of the Desmond Hall.
The 1638 Kilmallock fireplace. It has been removed from its original location and placed here in the vaulted chamber.

The first claim to the land of Desmond was obtained by the Fitzgeralds when John Fitzthomas married the co-heiress Margery FitzAnthony and was granted in 1251 a share in her father’s lands described as “all the lands of Decies and Desmond and custody of the castle of Dungarvan.” This land was added to the Fitzgerald landholdings in Limerick and North Kerry. In 1292 King Edward I (d. 1307) granted Thomas Fitzmorice (Fitzgerald) and his wife Margaret Berkeley, who was a cousin of the king, “joint custody of Decies and Desmond.” It’s interesting that the wife was given joint custody, and that daughters could be heirs, which as we know was not always the case.

A leaflet from the castle tells us that by 1298, a strong stone castle stood overlooking the Arra River in Newcastle West. Curtain walls with defensive towers surrounding the main buildings, a variety of simple thatched houses and byres for cattle as well as fishponds. The Normans immediately began to consolidate their position by negotiating with the local Gaelic families, while driving the poorer Gaelic peasants into the mountains. By the time of Maurice Fitzthomas Fitzgerald (abt. 1293-1356), the O’Briens to the north had become firm allies of the Fitzgeralds. In 1329, Maurice was created 1st Earl of Desmond, the term “Desmond” being derived from the Irish Deas mnumhain meaning south Munster. By this time the Fitzgeralds were using the Irish language in their daily lives and had taken on many of the values and habits of the Irish culture.

Information board about the Desmonds in the fourteenth century.

The 1st Earl plotted against the King of England, and allied himself with the Gaelic lords. They pillaged many settlements in the south of Ireland. He is said to have written to the Pope to say that King Edward III of England had no right to the lordship of Ireland. It is also claimed that he wrote to the kings of France and Scotland to form an alliance. During a campaign against him he lost his castles at Askeaton and Castleisland. However, the King pardoned him and made him Chief Justiciar of Ireland in 1355.

Gearóid Iarla (c. 1338-1398) became the 3rd Earl of Desmond in 1356. He was an expert mathematician and apparently, the leaflet tells us, a magician! He was also a poet and introduced the idea of courtly love into Gaelic poetry. He also served as Justiciar. He married Alianore, or Eleanor, Butler, daughter of James 2nd Earl of Ormond.

Information board and the Desmonds versus the Ormonds.

Despite the marriage alliance between the Desmonds and the Ormonds, they still battled. A fifteen day conference at Clonmel in 1384 led to a treaty between the families.

Thomas the 8th Earl of Desmond (c. 1426-1468) was made Lord Deputy of Ireland 1464-67. During his time the Desmonds fought again with the Ormonds, including during the War of the Roses when they took opposing sides. The Ormonds supported the victorious Lancasters.

The 8th Earl was however thought to side with the Irish still and was executed by the next Lord Deputy.

The information boards give us more history about Desmond family. The Earls of Desmond fell out of favour after the 8th Earl was executed in 1468.

After the execution of the 8th Earl of Desmond in 1468, the later Earls withdrew from contact with England. The leaflet from the site tells us that the arrival of new settlers in Munster as well as Catholic mistrust of the Protestant state set off risings by the Earls in 1567-73 and 1579-83. Earl Gerald (15th Earl) was declared an outlaw and Munster was laid waste by Crown forces. The rebellion was a failure and Gerald was captured and killed during a cattle raid. The Desmond lands were taken and distributed to English settlers.

This takes us up to the fifteenth century and the time when the Hall would have been used, as we see it today. The information board tells us that the Hall was where the Lord held court, and that this has two meanings: it was the court of judgement as well as the court of entertainment and dining.

Information board about Halls in Irish castles.
James Fitzgerald the 7th Earl of Desmond is credited with making extensive repairs to the castle complex between 1440 and 1460, including converting what was probably the 13th century chapel into the large and elaborate banqueting hall we see today.

The Banqueting Hall was restored in the early 19th century, the ruined battlements were taken down and a new pitch pine roof was put on. The original hooded stone fireplace had collapsed and a seventeenth century replacement, the one we now see in the lower vault, was installed, taken from a house in Kilmallock. The Banqueting Hall was used as a Masonic lodge and later as a general purpose hall for the community.

The leaflet tells us that when the 17th century fireplace was taken down for repair and cleaning, enough of the original hooded fireplace remained that it could be reconstructed with reasonable accuracy.

There was evidence for a timber screen at the west end of the hall, and this has been replaced by a musician’s gallery made of oak.

The restored oak gallery.

I was surprised to hear that the windows facing the village would have had glass in the fifteenth century. The other side, away from public view, would not have had this expensive luxury.

The Lord would have sat on a raised stage, for viewing and to look impressive.
These are the sorts of eating vessels that would have been used, our guided told us. I love the little decorative head on the jug.
The Halla Mór.
Information board about the Halla Mór.

The later history of Desmond Hall is after the lands of Gerald the 15th Earl of Desmond were seized.

After the Earls of Desmond has lost their land, it was given to some prominent and wealthy Englishmen who would develop the Munster Plantation. These men, called “Undertakers,” would undertake to establish English families on the land they were given. Sir William Courtenay (or Courtney) (1553-1630), 3rd Earl of Devon, was granted 10,000 acres at Newcastle. He was originally from Devon in England, and he was given land on condition that eighty English colonists would be housed on his property.

Newcastle passed to William Courtenay’s son George Courtenay (d. 1644), who in 1621 became 1st Baronet Courtenay of Newcastle, County Limerick. The sign boards tell us that in 1641 English settlers crowded into the protection of the walled castle, but after a long seige it fell to General Purcell of the Confederate forces. The Confederates where an amalgamation of Gaelic Ulster families and Anglo-Norman families who were dissatisfied with assurances given to them by King Charles I about their freedom to practice their Catholic faither, and they feared the militant intolerance of the English Parliament.

The Courteney’s built an mansion to replace the destroyed castle. George’s son Francis inherited, but as he had no offspring, Newcastle passed to his cousin, William Courtenay (1628-1702) 5th Earl of Devon and 1st Baronet Courtenay. The property remained in the family but they did not live there, and finally it was sold in 1910.

In 1777 William 2nd Viscount Courtenay (1742-1788) built a Church of Ireland church between the Banqueting Hall and the main square of the town. It was demolished in 1962 as it had fallen into disrepair. The 2nd Viscount was 8th Earl of Devon and 4th Baronet Courtenay.

In 1922 the main building, then known as Devon Castle, burnt, and was replaced by a house nearby. The Desmond Hall was sold to the Nash family, and finally the Land Commisson took over the land. Desmond Hall was used for town social events and the Halla Mór as a cinema. The Hall became a National Monument in 1981. Restoration began in 1989.

6. Lough Gur, County Limerick:

Lough Gur, photograph from Ireland’s Content pool, by Ken Williams 2021 for Failte Ireland. [see 1]

The Irish Homes and Gardens website tells us that Ireland’s first settlers arrived around 8000BC. The introduction of farming in 4000BC saw a move to a more settled lifestyle and the building of farmsteads, with both circular and rectangular house styles being used. The first rectangular house and the largest concentration of Neolithic structures were found in Lough Gur dating back to 3500BC.

Although none of these houses remain, the lasting legacy from this period on the Irish landscape is the megalithic tomb: the Dolmen or Portal tomb with its huge capstone or lintel, balanced on smaller stones and the Passage tombs, with their dry-stone passages leading to corbelled ceilings (circular layers of flattish stones closed with a single stone at the top). [ https://www.irishhomesandgardens.ie/irish-architecture-history-part-1/ ]

From the OPW website https://heritageireland.ie/visit/places-to-visit/lough-gur/:

Lough Gur is a site of international significance due to the area’s rich archaeology and environment. It is home to Ireland’s oldest and largest stone circle and the only natural lake of significance in South East Limerick. Lough Gur also has an abundance of ancient monuments in State care with a reported 2,000 archaeological monuments in a 5km radius. Visitors to Lough Gur Lakeshore Park will find a hillside visitor centre where you can take part in a guided or self guided tour of the exhibition. There is also an option to take a full outdoor guided tour of the archaeological monuments. Tours are tailor made and can range from 30 minutes to 3 hours. The Lakeshore Park and tours are run by Lough Gur Development Group.

Lough Gur Visitor Centre, photograph from Ireland’s Content pool, by Keith Wiseman 2013 for Failte Ireland. [see 1]
Lough Gur Visitor Centre, photograph from Ireland’s Content pool, by Keith Wiseman 2013 for Failte Ireland. [see 1]

[1] https://www.irelandscontentpool.com/en

[2] https://heritageireland.ie/visit/places-to-visit/

Places to visit and stay in County Limerick, Munster

On the map above:

blue: places to visit that are not section 482

purple: section 482 properties

red: accommodation

yellow: less expensive accommodation for two

orange: “whole house rental” i.e. those properties that are only for large group accommodations or weddings, e.g. 10 or more people.

green: gardens to visit

grey: ruins

Munster’s counties are Clare, Cork, Kerry, Limerick, Tipperary and Waterford.

For places to stay, I have made a rough estimate of prices at time of publication:

€ = up to approximately €150 per night for two people sharing (in yellow on map);

€€ – up to approx €250 per night for two;

€€€ – over €250 per night for two.

For a full listing of accommodation in big houses in Ireland, see my accommodation page: https://irishhistorichouses.com/accommodation/

Limerick:

1. Ash Hill, Kilmallock, Co. Limericksection 482

2. Askeaton Castle, County Limerick – OPW

3. Desmond Castle, Adare, County Limerick – OPW

4. Desmond Castle, Newcastlewest, County Limerick – OPW

5. Glebe House, Holycross, Bruff, Co. Limerick – section 482

6. Glenville House, Glenville, Ardagh, Co. Limerick – section 482

7. Glenquin Castle, Newcastle West, Co Limerick – open to visitors 

8. Glenstal Abbey, County Limerick

9. Kilpeacon House, Crecora, Co. Limerick – section 482

10. King John’s Castle, Limerick

11. Odellville House, Ballingarry, Co. Limerick – section 482

12. Mount Trenchard House and Garden, Foynes, Co. Limerick – section 482

13. The Turret, Ryanes, Ballyingarry, Co. Limerick – section 482

14. The Old Rectory, Rathkeale, Co. Limerick – section 482

Places to stay, County Limerick:

1. Adare Manor, Limerick – hotel €€€

2. Ash Hill Towers, Kilmallock, Co Limerick – section 482, Hidden Ireland accommodation €

3. Ballyteigue House, County Limerick self-catering whole house accommodation, rental per week. €€ for two, € for 4-10

4. Deebert House, Kilmallock, County Limerick – B&B and self-catering

5. The Dunraven, Adare, Co Limerick € 

6. Flemingstown House, Kilmallock, Co. Limerick, Ireland whole house accommodation, up to 11 guests. €€€ for two for a week, € for 4-11

7. Longcourt House Hotel, Newcastle West, Co Limerick €

8. Woodlands House and Spa, Adare, Co Limerick €€

Whole house rental County Limerick

1. Ballyteigue House, Bruree, County Limerick – self-catering whole house accommodation, rental per week. €€ for two, € for 4-10

2. Fanningstown Castle, Adare, County Limerick – sleeps 10

3. Flemingstown House, Kilmallock, Co. Limerick, Ireland whole house accommodation, up to 11 guests. €€€ for two for a week, € for 4-11

4. Glin Castle, whole house rental.

5. Springfield Castle, Drumcollogher, Co. Limerick, Ireland €€€ for 2, € for 5-25.

Limerick:

1. Ash Hill, Kilmallock, Co. Limerick – section 482 €

contact: Simon and Nicole Johnson
Tel: 063-98035
www.ashhill.com
(Tourist Accommodation Facility)
Open: Apr 1-Sept 30, 9.30am-4.30pm Fee: adult €5, child/OAP/student €3

Ashill Towers, taken  c.1865-1914 by Robert French, Lawrence Photographic Collection, National Library of Ireland, flickr constant commons. The two corner towers were taken down in the 1960s.
Ash Hill, August 2022. Listed in National Inventory of Architectural Heritage. [1]

The website tells us: “Ash Hill is a large, comfortable Georgian estate, boasting many fine stucco ceilings and cornices throughout the house. For guests wishing to stay at Ash Hill, we have three beautifully appointed en-suite bedrooms, all of which can accommodate one or more cots…Open to the public from January 15th through December 15th. Historical tours with afternoon tea are easily arranged and make for an enjoyable afternoon. We also host small workshops of all kinds, upon request…For discerning guests, Ash Hill can be rented, fully staffed, in its entirety [comfortably sleeps 10 people]. Minimum rental 7 days.”

We treated ourselves to a stay during Heritage Week 2022 – write-up coming soon!

Our bedroom at Ash Hill, County Limerick.

Mark Bence-Jones writes in his Guide to Irish Country Houses (1988):

“(Evans/Carbery/ Johnson/ Harrington) A C18 pedimented house [the National Inventory tells us it was built in 1781], the back of which was rebuilt in Gothic 1833, probably to the design of James and George Richard Pain [the National Inventory corrects this – it was designs by Charles Frederick Anderson], with two slender round battlemented and machiolated towers. Rectangular windows with wooden tracery. Good plasterwork in upstairs drawing room in the manner of Wyatt and by the same hand as the hall at Glin Castle; saloon with domed ceiling. The towers have, in recent years, been removed. Originally a seat of the Evans family; passed in the later C19 to John Henry Weldon. Now the home of Major Stephen Johnson.” [2]

The website also tells us about its history:

The oldest evidence of habitation at Ash Hill is what is believed to be a long barrow grave dating somewhere between 4000 and 2000 B.C. This was described in letters written by Eileen Foster, an American visiting her ancestral home, Ash Hill, in 1908. Miss Foster wrote “close to the avenue, as they call it, although there are trees on only one side of the road, is a large green mound which is supposed to mark the burial place of one of the Irish chieftains and a number of his followers. It was the custom in those days to bury a dozen or so of his slaves with every chieftain. Father says he would like to explore the spot, but not a man could be found who would put a spade into the sacred earth”.

Also on the estate, beside the site of an old lake, there are the remains of a crannog (an Irish house built on a small island) usually dating prior to 1000 A.D. The lake was drained in the 1915 and during this process, the remains of numerous Irish Elk (deer from the interglacial period) were discovered.

Close to the lake, overlooking the town, is the site of Castle Coote, birthplace of Lieutenant General Sir Eyre Coote, conqueror of India. This castle was demolished in the later half of the eighteenth century.

The courtyard to the main house was built sometime between 1720 and 1740 and it was sympathetically restored in the 1950’s by the late Mrs. Denny Johnson. The present house, which overlooks this courtyard, was built by Chidley Coote [1735-1799] in 1781.

The courtyard side of the house, Ash Hill.
The stables in the courtyard, Ash Hill.

This part of the house has numerous ceilings of historical and architectural importance displaying dancers from Herculaneum which are similar to the stucco medallions found in the saloon at Castletown, County Kildare. Numerous windows, looking out onto the courtyard, date from this period and have the original glass. 

In the 1830’s, Eyre Evans [1773-1856] employed Charles Anderson, an architect, to build the front of the house in a Gothic style with two large towers on it. There are various Gothic features in this part of the house. Unfortunately, due to excessive rates (a valuation based property tax), some parts of the house, including the towers, were removed in the early 1960’s.

During the “troubled times”, the house was occupied by three sets of troops who looted and vandalized the property, using ancient family portraits for target practice. As these “troubled times” were ending, Michael Collins, the Irish leader at the time, visited the house on his way south to what would be his violent and untimely demise at the hands of his enemies. There is a considerable amount of graffiti left on the walls of the top floor rooms which were occupied by both troops and prisoners.

The first recorded ownership of Ash Hill was in 1667 when Chidley Coote [d. 1702, grandson of Charles Coote, 1st Baronet Coote, of Castle Cuffe, Queen’s Co., or perhaps his father Chidley Coote (d. 1668)] acquired the property from Catherine Bligh. It is probable that he had a son who was also Chidley Coote [(1678-1730). He married Jane Evans of Bulgaden Hall, Limerick.]. In 1726, Lieutenant General Eyre Coote [1726-1783] (son of Chidley Coote–a clergyman and owner of Castle Coote) was born at Ash Hill which was known as Castle Coote at that time [There were three other brothers: Robert Coote who married Anne Purdon of Ballyclough, County Cork (now partly demolished); Reverend Charles Coote who married Grace Tilson; Thomas Coote who married Eleanor White of Charleville, County Cork]. General Coote went on to become one of the greatest military tacticians of the eighteenth century with numerous victories to his credit, including winning India from the French in the Seven Years’ War and defeating Hyder Ali despite being outnumbered by almost twenty to one. This same victorious pattern was to be repeated in battles throughout the war. 

Coote’s nephew, Sir Eyre Coote [(1762-1823), son of Eyre Coote’s brother Reverend Charles Evans Coote (1713-1796)], who was born at Ash Hill in the late eighteenth century, became the Lieutenant Governor of Jamaica between 1806 and 1808. It has been said that Coote, while living in Jamaica, had a relationship with a slave girl. Although unconfirmed, it is thought that Colin Powell, hero of the Gulf War, may be a descendent of this relationship.

Major-General Sir Eyre Coote, (1762-?1824), Governor of Jamaica Date 1805 Engraver Antoine Cardon, Flemish, 1772-1813 After W. P. J. Lodder, British, fl.1783-1804 Publisher A. Cardon, photograph courtesy of National Gallery of Ireland.

Sometime prior to 1799, Ash Hill passed on to Eyre Evans. We are still attempting to ascertain if Eyre Evans was a descendent of Eyre Coote [I believe he is related: Jane Evans who married Reverend Chidley Coote had a brother named Thomas Evans (d. 1753). He had a son, Eyre Evans (1723-1773). This Eyre had a son also named Eyre Evans (1773-1856). It was he who inherited Ash Hill Towers. He married Anna Maunsell of Limerick]. We believe this could well be the case in light of both parties sharing the same first name as well as ownership of Ash Hill. At about the time of the Famine, ownership of the estate passed out of the Evans family and, in 1858, part of the estate was acquired by Thomas Weldon. In 1860, another part of the estate was acquired by Captain Henry Frederick Evans. In 1880, Evans’ widow sold her interest in the estate to John Henry Weldon, a son of Thomas Weldon. 

The Evans family was a large family with many branches that emigrated to New Zealand, Australia, South Africa, England, Canada and U.S.A. One of the branch that emigrated to New Zealand was a prolific writer and much or possibly all of his writings were donated to the Alexander Turnbull library in Wellington, New Zealand. 

The estate passed out of the Weldon family to P.M. Lindsay in 1911. Captain Lindsay sold Ash Hill to Mrs. Denny Johnson in 1946. 

After Denise Johnson bought the property in 1946 she ran it as a successful stud, and she was a successful point-to-point rider with over 50 wins to her name. In 1956 she married Stado Johnson. After many falls she was told to “take up a safer sport then point-to point riding” by her doctor, she took up 3-day eventing and represented Ireland at an international level. 

Today, Ash Hill has been opened to the public and sees a great many people of vaired interests. From architects to historians interested in taking a peek at Ireland’s unique past, all are welcome. Ash Hill is still owned by the Johnson family who enjoy sharing their love of history and the outdoors with the public. Most days, Simon and Nikki Johnson can be found wandering around the estate tending to the garden and pastures. For those interested, Simon can be happily talked into a full tour.

2. Askeaton Castle, County Limerick – OPW

See my OPW write-up: https://irishhistorichouses.com/2022/06/26/opw-sites-in-munster-clare-limerick-and-tipperary/

3. Desmond Castle, Adare, County Limerick – OPW

See my OPW write-up: https://irishhistorichouses.com/2022/06/26/opw-sites-in-munster-clare-limerick-and-tipperary/

4. Desmond Castle, Newcastlewest, County Limerick – OPW

Desmond Castle, Newcastle West, County Limerick, August 2022.

See my OPW write-up: https://irishhistorichouses.com/2022/06/26/opw-sites-in-munster-clare-limerick-and-tipperary/

5. Glebe House, Holycross, Bruff, Co. Limerick – section 482

Is it this? Brackvoan, former Presbytry, Bruff, County Limerick, photograph from National Inventory of Architectural Heritage. [3]

contact: Kate Hayes and Colm McCarthy
Tel: 087-6487556
Open: Jan 4-7, 10-14, 17-21, 24-28, 31, Aug 13-22, Sept 1-30, Mon-Fri, 5.30pm- 9.30pm, Sat-Sun, 8am-12 noon

Fee: Free

6. Glenville House, Glenville, Ardagh, Co. Limerick – section 482

Glenville House, County Limerick, August 2022.

contact: Owen O’Neill
Tel: 086-2541435
Open dates in 2022: Apr 1-30, May 1-31, Sept 1-13, Tue-Sat, Aug 13-21, 9.30am-1.30pm Fee: adult €5, OAP/student €3, child free

We visited during Heritage Week 2022 – write-up coming soon!

The National Inventory tells us it is a :”Detached three-bay two-storey country house, dated 1803, having six-bay block to north (rear) elevation, extending to east of main block and adjoining L-plan multiple-bay two-storey outbuilding. Central full-height breakfront to south (front) elevation. …Flat arched opening to east elevation with cut limestone surround, voussoirs and keystone, and double-leaf timber battened door… Lunette openings to first floor, east and west elevations, having tooled limestone sills, red brick surrounds and timber framed windows…

Once the home of William Massey, this building is currently undergoing restoration. Its size and massing make it a very notable feature on the landscape and the regular façade and restrain in ornamentation adds to the imposing appearance. The retention of timber sliding sash windows and limestone sills is significant, and adds to the architectural significance of the site. Symmetry is evident in the design and is enhanced by the hipped roof, central chimneystacks and breakfront. The outbuildings, walled garden to the rear, and gate lodge all serve to add context to the site. Keystone reads: ‘WM/AD/1803’.” [4]

Glenville House, Limerick.

7. Glenquin Castle, Newcastle West, Co Limerick – open to visitors 

One of the finest tower houses to survive from the 16th century, Gleann an Choim (Glen of the Shelter) is situated a few miles from Ashford at the edge of the road (open to the public during summer). 

This castle was a fortified dwelling, for the protection against raids and invaders, more correctly described as a Tower House. [5]

Robert O’Byrne tells us: “Thought to stand on the site of an older building dating from the 10th century, Glenquin Castle in Killeedy was built by the O’Hallinan family (their name deriving from the Irish Ó hAilgheanáin, meaning mild or noble). When the castle was built seems unclear; both the mid-15th and mid-16th centuries are proposed. Regardless, it is typical of tower houses being constructed at the time right around the country.” [6]

8. Glenstal Abbey, County Limerick

Glenstal Abbey, Courtesy Michelle Crowley 2020 for Tourism Ireland, Ireland’s Content Pool. [7]

https://glenstal.com/

The website tells us: “Glenstal Abbey is home to a community of Benedictine monks in County Limerick, Ireland, and is a place of prayer, work, education and hospitality. The monastery sits alongside a popular guesthouse and a boarding school for boys, housed within a 19th century Normanesque castle amidst five hundred magnificent acres of farmland, forest, lakes and streams.

We are happy to welcome groups who wish to visit the monastery and spend some time getting to know our place, our tradition and our life.”

You can book to stay, as a retreat: https://glenstal.com/abbey/stay/

View of a copy of the romansque cathedral door in Glenstall. Country Life 03/10/1974 [8]

The castle was built as a home for Joseph Barrington (1764-1846), 1st Baronet of Limerick. Joseph married Mary Baggott – I wonder are we distantly related? She was the daughter of Daniel Baggot (the landed families website tells us that he was a bootseller in Limerick!). Joseph’s son Matthew, 2nd Baronet was also involved with having the home built.

The front door is flanked by figures of Henry II and Queen Eleanor, who were such a warring couple that one wonders if they were chosen in ignorance: the Queen holds a scroll on which is inscribed the Irish welcome, Cead mile failte. [9]

Mark Bence-Jones writes (1988):

p. 139. “(Barrington, BT/Pb) A massive Norman-Revival castle by William Bardwell, of London, begun in 1837, though not finished till about 1880. 

The main building comprises a square, three-storey keep joined to a broad round tower by a lower range. 

The entrance front is approached through a gatehouse copied from that of Rockingham Castle, Northamptonshire. The stonework is of excellent quality and there is wealth of carving; the entrance door is flanked by the figures of Edward I and Eleanor of Castille; while the look-out tower is manned by a stone soldier. Groined entrance hall; staircase of dark oak carved with animals, foliage and Celtic motifs, hemmed in by Romanesque columns; drawing room with mirror in Norman frame. Octagonal library at the base of the round tower, lit by small windows in very deep recesses; the vaulted ceiling painted with blue and gold stars; central pier panelled in looking-glass with fireplace. Elaborately carved stone Celtic-Romanesque doorway copied from Killaloe Cathedral between two of the reception rooms. Glen with fine trees and shrubs; river and lake, many-arched bridge. Now a Benedictine Abbey and a well-known  boys’ public school.” 

Glenstal Abbey, photograph from National Inventory of Architectural Heritage.
Glenstal Abbey, photograph from National Inventory of Architectural Heritage.
Glenstal Abbey, photograph from National Inventory of Architectural Heritage.
Glenstal Abbey, photograph from National Inventory of Architectural Heritage.
Glenstal Abbey, photograph from National Inventory of Architectural Heritage.
Glenstal Abbey, photograph from National Inventory of Architectural Heritage.
Glenstal Abbey, photograph from National Inventory of Architectural Heritage.

Sean O’Reilly writes: “the castle remains one of the most magnificent attempts at creating an Irish version of the medieval Anglo-Norman castle. Yet Glenstal’s castle-like form is not due to the need for defence. In a tradition going back to Georgian castles such as Glin, Co Limerick and Charleville forest, Co Offaly, the intention is to evoke some ancient time, but conbined with the needs of a modern country house.” [10]

“(p. 172)The appearance of antiquity might also give to its patron at least the suggestion of an ancient lineage, and that in itself, in an increasingly disjointed Irish society, was not without significance. The Barringtons settled in Limerick relatively late, at the end of the seventeenth century, and furthered their fame less though marriage than through hard work, innovative industry and successful trading. Pofessional advancement was not accompanied by significant social advance, and though Joseph Barrington was a baronet, the family were in essence business people rather than aristocracy. Although there was no speedier way of securing the impression of title and history than by having one’s own castle, his son Matthew, Crown solicitor for Munster, must have recognized the discomfort of real castles, and so decided to build a more comfortable, modern version. 

The design passed through numerous phases even before building began. Even after construction commenced in 1838, from designs provided by the successful English architect William Bardwell, changes, indecision and economic variables all added further complications. Initially, before the selection of the design, the problem was the choice of site. Not having inherited lands on which to build, Barrington might use any site, and he decided first on property he had leased in 1818 from the increasingly encumbered Limerick estates of the Lord Carberry. Part of these included the district of Glenstal, at one time intended as a site for the house, and although Barrington later turned to various other sites, he took with him the name. Consequently, in a very characteristic Georgian incongruity, the title of this apparently ancient castle bears no relation to the land on which it sits.

View of the Central peri of one of the fire places in the library at Glenstall. Country Life 03/10/1974 [8]
 

O’Reilly tells us “[William] Bardwell [1795-1890], little known today despite his long life – he died in 1890 aged 95 – was still less familiar when first employed by Barrington, and Glenstal remains his most important work. After training in England he advanced his studies, rather unusually for the date, in France. He gained some celebrity through competing both for the London Houses of Parliament, and for the Fitzwilliam Museum at Cambridge. It may well have been the Norman tower proposed by Bardwell as his entrance to Parliament that suggested him to his Limerick patron, though as all periods of architecture were intended to be represented in that building, any prospective client may have found something of interest. 

The ultimate inspiration for Bardwell’s Glenstal lay less with the designs of the Paines or O’Hara than with the work of Thomas Hopper, notably his Gosford Castle in Armagh, of 1819. This was the first Normal revival castle in these islands, and the first in a style that Hopper would make his own. Neither Barrington nor Bardwell need have been with Gosford itself, for by the late 1830s the type was not uncommon. 

…Bardwell was in Ireland in 1840, reviewing the completed work. It then extended from the largest, southern, tower to the gatehouse in the south-east wall. However, work stopped in the following year, and began again only in 1846 or 1847. Construction paused again in 1849, to recommence in about 1853, with Bardwell finally paid off, and a Cork architect, Joshua Hargrave, appointed to complete the work with restricted funds, and to create something approaching a functioning building…

Most carving was executed by an English firm, W.T. Kelsey of Brompton, which provided fifteen cases of columns, capitals and corbels in 1844. However, the detailing of much of the carved work suggests some familiarity with Irish early Christian sources, and echoes abound of recent work at Adare Manor, itself being slowly built over many years, although using native craftsmen. 

If much of the carved detail is evocative rather than accurate, there are also striking and significant copies of Irish early Christian design. The style was then only beginning to receive proper attention as part of Ireland’s heritage. The idea may have been inspired again by Dunraven’s Adare – Barrington is known to have had business dealings with the family – for they used such Hiberno-Romanesque designs in the doorcase of their entrance hall. At Glenstal we find superb copies, notably the doorcase connecting the dining room and drawing room. This is a magnificently carved and surprisingly accurate reconstruction of the doorway in Killaloe Cathedral, Co Clare, today recognized as one of the masterpieces of the Irish Romanesque. A lack of understanding of the importance of such work was prevalent in mid-nineteenth-century Ireland – it might be compared to the recent lack of interest in the heritage of the country house – and its introduction here was an important moment in the history of the revival of interest in Ireland’s Christian and Celtic legacy.

“…It was part of a wider interest in Ireland’s national character that the future of this important house was put in jeopardy. The tragic accidental shooting of the daughter of the 5th Baronet, Charles Barrington, by the IRA in an ambush on the Black and Tans in May 1921, led to the family’s departure and, eventually, the sale of the estate in 1925.

Timothy William Ferres quotes “The Origins and Early Days of Glenstal” by Mark Tierney OSB, in Martin Browne OSB and Colmán O Clabaigh (eds), The Irish Benedictines: a history (Dublin, 2005):

When eventually, in 1925, the time came to leave, Sir Charles made a magnificent gesture. He wrote to the Irish Free State government, offering Glenstal as a gift to the Irish nation, specifically suggesting that it might be a suitable residence for the Governor-General. 

Mr W T. Cosgrave, the President of the Executive Council of the Irish Free State, and Mr Tim Healy, the Governor-General, visited Glenstal in July 1925, and ‘were astonished at its magnificence, which far exceeded our expectations’. However, financial restraints forced them to turn down the offer. Mr Cosgrave wrote to Sir Charles, stating that ‘our present economic position would not warrant the Ministry in applying to the Dail to vote the necessary funds for the upkeep of Glenstal’. “

9. Kilpeacon House, Crecora, Co. Limerick – section 482

contact: Donie and Mary Costello
Tel: 087-9852462
Open: May 3-June 30, Mon- Sat, Aug 13-21, 10am-2pm Fee: adult €8, child/OAP/student €4

Kilpeacon, County Limerick, photograph from National Inventory of Architectural Heritage.

Mark Bence-Jones writes in his A Guide to Irish Country Houses (1988):

“[Gavin, sub Westropp/IFR] An early C19 villa undoubtedly by Sir Richard Morrison, though it is undocumented; having a strong likeness to Morrison’s “show” villa, Bearforest, Co Cork; while its plan is, in Mr. McPartland’s words, “an ingenious contraction of that of Castlegar,” one of his larger houses in the villa manner, 2 storey; 3 bay front; central breakfront; curved balustraded porch with Ionic columns; Wyatt windows under semi-circular relieving arches on either side in lower storey. Eaved roof. 5 bay side elevation. Oval entrance hall. Small but impressively high central staircase hall lit by lantern and surrounded by arches lighting a barrel-vaulted bedroom corridor. The seat of the Gavin family.

The landed estates database tells us:

Lewis writes that the manor was granted to William King in the reign of James I and that “the late proprietor” had erected a handsome mansion which was now the “property and residence of Cripps Villiers”. In his will dated 1704 William King refers to his niece Mary Villiers. The Ordnance Survey Field Name Book states that Kilpeacon House was the property of Edward Villiers, Dublin, and was occupied by Miss Deborah Cripps. Built in 1820 it was a large, commodious building of 2 stories. It was the residence of Edward C. Villiers at the time of Griffith’s Valuation, held in fee and valued at £60. Bought by Major George Gavin in the early 1850s from the Villiers and the residence of his son Montiford W. Gavin in the early 20th century. The Irish Tourist Association surveyor writes in 1942 that this house was completed in 1799. The owner was Mrs O’Kelly, her husband having purchased the house in 1927 from the Gavins. This house is still extant and occupied.” [11] 

10. King John’s Castle, Limerick

King John’s Castle Limerick, July 2018.

Maintained by Shannon Heritage. Archiseek tells us: “King John’s Castle, on the south side of Thomond Bridge head, built in 1210 “to dominate the bridge and watch towards Thomond”, is one of the finest specimens of fortified Norman architecture in Ireland.

The castle is roughly square on plan and its 60 meter frontage along the river is flanked by two massive round towers, each over 15m. in diameter with walls 3 metres thick. The castle gate entrance – a tall, narrow gateway between two tall, round towers is quite imposing. There is another massive round tower at the north east corner of the fortification, but the east wall and the square tower defending the south-east corner of the castle, and on which cannons were mounted, is long demolished. 

There was a military barracks erected within the walls in 1751, some of which still remains. Houses were also erected in the castle yard at a very much later date. These have now been removed and a modern visitor centre built on the walls. 

The walls and towers still remaining of the castle are in reasonably good state of preservation. The domestic buildings of the courtyard do not survive, except for remnants of a 13th century hall and the site of what could be the castle chapel.” [12]

King John’s Castle Limerick, July 2018.
King John’s Castle Limerick, July 2018.

The castle was built around 1197 under the orders of King John following the invasion of the Anglo-Normans. It was built on the site of an original Viking settlement believed to date back to 922 AD.” [13]

King John’s Castle, Limerick. The information board tells us that from here you can see the Gatehouse and the Great Hall. These are some of the earliest remaining features of the stone castle: the back of the twin-towered gatehouse and the northeast tower. The gatehouse defences were continued into the courtyard by means of an arched passageway, at the end of which were placed the inner gates of the castle. This extension was demolished in the 18th century.

The information board tells us that built between 1210-1212 along part of the line of the 12th century ringwork, the gatehouse was the first of its kind to be constructed in Ireland, with boldly projecting towers placed on either side of the gate. It followed the latest trend in European castle building, moving from rectangular to round towers, as curved walls offered better protection from attack, particularly from mining. Mining is when one digs a series of holes or “mines” under the walls in order to weaken the walls – hence comes our term “to undermine.” The two towers of the gatehouse are “D” shaped in plan, with three floors of circular chambers within and a parapet on top.

By flanking the gate, the two towers allowed the castle’s entrance to be defended in depth, from a number of well-positioned arrow loops in the chambers. The defences also included a portcullis and a murder hole. The castle was also supplied via the river, where there is a more modest watergate in the west curtain wall.

“In 1642 the castle was occupied by people escaping the confederate wars and was badly damaged in the Siege of Limerick. The confederate leader Garret Barry had no artillery so dug under the foundations of the castle’s walls, causing them to collapse. There was also considerable damage caused during the Williamite sieges in the 1690s and so the castle has been repaired and restored on a number of occasions.” [13]

It is a good place here to review the Siege of Limerick. Near the castle is the Treaty Stone: apparently the Treaty of Limerick, which was signed by, amongst others, John Baggot, was signed on this stone, which was later memorialised on a plinth. A series of plaques on the ground around the stone tells us the story of the Siege of Limerick:

The War of Two Kings. James II, a Catholic, was king of England. Parliament, unhappy with the power that James II had given to the Catholics, invite William and Mary to take over the throne. William of Orange was married to Mary the Protestant daughter of James. William arrives in England. James, fearing for his life, flees to France and gets support from his cousin Louis XIV, William’s enemy. James lands at Kinsale.

A document in St Patrick’s Cathedral, Dublin, with pictures of King William III and Queen Mary, the daughter of King James II.

William and Mary are crowned King and Queen of England. A French army of 7000 men arrive in Ireland to help James regain his crown.

King William arrives in Carrickfergus with a large army, aiming to take Dublin. Battle of the Boyne. James’ army had 25,000 poorly equipped Irish and French soldiers. William had 36,000 experienced soldiers from all over Europe. King William is victorious.”

King William sent General Schomberg first, who landed in Carrickfergus on 14th June 1690 with 300 troops.

Seats of Schonberg (or Schomberg) and King William III in St Patrick’s Cathedral, Dublin.
Chair where King William III sat in St Patrick’s Cathedral where he gave thank for winning the Battle of the Boyne.

The plaques continue the story: “July 2nd 1690 James flees to France. By the 2nd July, most of the army had gathered in Limerick with Tyrconnell [Richard Talbot (1630-1691), 1st Duke of Tyrconnell] in charge. Limerick, an important port, was the second largest city in the country, with 1000 inhabitants. The Irish military in Limerick had few weapons. A small force of French cavalry were with the Irish cavalry on the Clare side of the Shannon. Their leader was Patrick Sarsfield, Earl of Lucan [1620-1693].

First Siege of Limerick. King William’s army began to set up camp while they waited for their heavy guns and ammunition to arrive from Dublin. Aug 10th 1690, In a daring overnight raid Sarsfield attacked the siege train at Ballyneely. King William continued his siege but massive resistance from the Jacobite army and the people of Limerick, plus bad weather, forced him to call off the siege.

King William returned to England leaving Baron de Ginkel in charge. Cork and Kinsale surrendered to William’s army. Sarsfield rejects Ginkel’s offer of peace. More French help arrives in Limerick as well as a new French leader, the Marquis St. Ruth. Avoiding Limerick, Ginkel attacked Athlone, which guarded the main route into Connaght. 30th June 1691, Athlone surrendered. St. Ruth withdrew to Aughrim. 12th July 1691 The Battle of Aughrim. The bloodiest battle ever fought on Irish soil. The Jacobites were heading for victory when St. Ruth was killed by a cannonball. Without leadership the resistance collapsed and by nightfall, the Williamites had won, with heavy losses on both sides. Most of the Jacobites withdrew to Limerick.

There is a John Baggot who fought in the Battle of Aughrim, and lost an eye. He later went to France with the Wild Geese, and served in the court of James II and “James III” (his followers called him James III although he was not the recognised king).

The city walls had been strengthened since the previous year. Tyrconnell died in mid-August and the promised help from Louis XIV had not yet arrived. The Second Siege of Limerick. Ginkel and the Williamites reached Limerick and took up positions on the Irishtown side. They bombarded the city daily with cannon. They managed to break down a large section of the walls at English town, but could not get into the city. With a large English fleet on the Shannon, the city was cut off and almost completely surrounded. Sept 22nd 1691 Ginkel’s army attacked the Jacobites who were defending Thomond Bridge. The drawbridge was ordered to be raised too soon and about 600 Irish were killed or drowned. This had a profound effect on the morale of the garrison. A council of war was held and the Jacobites decided to call a truce. Leaders from both sides saw that they could gain more by ending the fighting and the discussions were conducted with great courtesy. The Treaty was finally signed on October 3rd 1691, reputedly on the Treaty Stone.

Article Civil and Military, agreed on the 3rd day of October 1691, between the Right Honourable Sir Charles Porter, Knight, and Thomas Coningsby, Esq, Lords Justices of Ireland, and his Excellency the Baron de Ginkel, Lieutenant General, and the Commander in Chief of the English army, of the one part and Sarsfield and his followers on the other. The treaty had civil and military sections. The Civil articles promised freedom to practice their religion to Catholics, but in the years after 1691, harsh laws were passed against Catholics known as the Penal Laws.

The broken treaty embittered relations between the English and Irish for two centuries.

The military parts of the Treaty allowed the Irish Jacobites to join the French army. Most of the Irish (about 14,000 approx.) went to France with Sarsfield. Some of their wives and children also travelled to France. These exiles were known as the Wild Geese. The Wild Geese became part of the French army, which included Irish regimens until the French Revolution. Wine Geese: some of the Wild Geese got into the wine trade, where their names live on today, names such as Michael Lynch, who fought in the battle of the Boyne, Phelan, Barton, and Richard Hennessy of Hennessy cognac.

John Baggot’s sons (sons of Eleanor Gould), John and Ignatius, became soldiers and one fought for France and one fought for Spain.

In 1791 the British Army built military barracks suitable for up to 400 soldiers at the castle and remained there until 1922. In 1935 the Limerick Corporation removed some of the castle walls in order to erect 22 houses in the courtyard. These houses were subsequently demolished in 1989 when the castle was restored and opened to the public.” [13]

11. Odellville House, Ballingarry, Co. Limericksection 482

Odellville, Photograph from the National Inventory of Architectural Heritage. [14]

contact: Aisling Frawley
Tel: 085-8895125
www.odellville.simplesite.com
Open: May 1-31, June 1-30, Aug 13-21, 10am-2pm Fee: adult €8, student/OAP/child €4

The National Inventory tells us it is a detached five-bay two-storey over basement house, built c. 1780, with later two-storey extension to rear (south). It continues: “Odell Ville is typical of the small country houses of rural Ireland, often associated with the gentleman farmers of the eighteenth century. The retention of historic fabric such as sliding sash windows, fine tooled limestone details and modest door with its stepped approach all contribute positively to the building’s character. It was once the house of T. A. O’Dell, Esq. Athough of a modest design, the overall massing of the house makes a strong and positive impact on the surrounding countryside. The associated gate lodge adds further context and character to the site.” [14]

12. Mount Trenchard House and Garden, Foynes, Co. Limericksection 482

contact: Frieda Keane Carmody
Tel: 087-2220692
Open: June 1-31, July 1-31, Aug 1-31, 10am-4pm Fee: adult €10, child/OAP/student €5

Mount Trenchard, County Limerick, August 2022.

We visited Mount Trenchard during Heritage Week 2022 – write-up to follow soon!

The Landed estates database tells us:

Lewis described this mansion formerly called Cappa as “beautifully situated on the banks of the Shannon”. Marked as “Cappo” on the Taylor and Skinner map of the 1770s. Home of the Rice/Spring Rice family in the 19th century, valued at £40 in the 1850s and at £54 in 1906. Occupied by the Military in 1944, sold to Lady Holland in 1947 and to the Sisters of Mercy in 1953 who opened a school.” [15]

Mark Bence-Jones tells us in his A Guide to Irish Country Houses (1988):

“[Spring-Rice, Monteagle of Bandon, B/PB] A late-Georgian house of three storeys over basement, with 2 curved bows on its entrance front, which overlooks the estuary of the Shannon, and a wide curved bow in the centre of its garden front. At one side is a 2 storey Victorian wing almost as high as the main block; at the other side is 1 bay three storey addition and a lower 2 storey wing. Also in the Victorian period, a rather unusal porch was added, in the form of a short length of curving corridor, with an open arched end; it was placed not in the centre of the front, but to the left of the left-hand bow, growing out of the high two storey addition. This was subsequently removed and a more conventional entrace doorway made between the two bows with a pillared and pedimented doorcase. From the garden front, a straight walk between trees ascends the hillside. In recent years the home of Lt-Cmdr C.E. Hall; now owned by an order of teaching nuns.

Timothy William Ferres tells us in his blog:

“Thomas Rice, of Mount Trenchard, wedded Mary, daughter of Maurice FitzGerald, 14th Knight of Kerry, and had issue, a son, Stephen Edward Rice, of Mount Trenchard, who married, in 1785, Catherine, only child and heir of Thomas Spring, of Castlemaine, County Kerry.” [16]

Their son was Thomas Spring-Rice (1790-1866), of Brandon, County Kerry, Chancellor of the Exchequer, 1835-39. He married in 1811 the Lady Theodosia Pery, second daughter of Edmund, 1st Earl of Limerick. Thomas was elevated to the peerage in 1839 to become 1st Baron Monteagle of Brandon, County Kerry.

When the 5th Baron Monteagle of Brandon died in 1946, the estate was sold.

Recently the house was used as a Direct Provision Centre.

13. The Turret, Ryanes, Ballyingarry, Co. Limerick – section 482

The Turret, County Limerick, August 2022.

contact: Donal Mc Goey
Tel: 086-2432174
Open: May 1-31, June 1-30, July 1-31, Aug 1-31,12 noon-4pm Fee: adult €5, OAP/child/student/ free

We visited The Turret during Heritage Week 2022: write-up to follow soon!

Mark Bence-Jones writes in his A Guide to Irish Country Houses (1988):

“(Odell/LGI1958) A three storey house, 1 room deep, with a curvilinear gable at one end of its front; built 1683 by Major John Odell; said to have incorporated a turret surviving from an old house of the Knights Hospitallers, hence its name. Became a presbytery at the end of C19, when an enclosed porch was added on the front and a wing at the back.”

14. The Old Rectory, Rathkeale, Co. Limerick – section 482

contact: John Roche
Tel: 087-8269123
Open: May 1-Nov 27, Saturday and Sundays, National Heritage Week, Aug 13-21 10am-2pm

Fee: adult €8, child/OAP/student €3

Places to stay, County Limerick:

1. Adare Manor, Limerick – hotel €€€

Adare Manor, Limerick, October 2012.
Adare Manor, photograph from Lawrence Collection, National Library of Ireland, flickr constant commons.

Mark Bence-Jones writes (1988):

Originally a two storey 7 bay early C18 house with a 3 bay pedimented breakfront and a high-pitched roof on a bracket cornice; probably built ca 1720-1730 by Valentine Quin [1691-1744], grandfather of the first Earl of Dunraven [Valentine Richard Quin (1752-1824)].”

David Hicks tells us in his Irish Country Houses, A Chronicle of Change that Valentine Quin converted to Protestantism to retain the Quinn lands. In the 1780s his son Windham remodelled the Georgian house in a neoclassical manner and made many improvements including the addition of another storey. His son Valentine Richard Quin inherited but due to debt, moved to England to live a more frugal lifestyle. He was created 1st Baronet Quin, of Adare, Co. Limerick in 1781, and 1st Baron Adare, of Adare in 1800 for voting for the Act of Union, and finally 1st Earl of Dunraven and Mount-Earl in 1822, Dunravan being chosen in honour of his daughter-in-law Caroline Wyndham and her home Dunraven Castle in Wales. His son Windham Henry (1782-1850), 2nd Earl, returned to the heavily indebted Irish estate in 1801 and managed to reduce debts by leasing land. He was elected MP for Limerick in 1806. He was a supporter of the Union but also an advocate of Catholic emancipation. In 1810 he married Caroline Wyndham, heiress to large estates in Wales, and as a result of her large inheritance, the Quin family name was changed to Wyndham-Quin. The Quin and Wyndham heraldic shields decorate the entrance to the manor. An inscription in Gothic lettering on the south front of the manor reads “This goodly house was erected by Windham Henry Earl of Dunraven and Caroline his Countess without borrowing, selling or leaving a debt.”

Bence-Jones continues: “From 1832 onwards the 2nd Earl, whose wife was the wealthy heiress of the Wyndhams of Dunraven, Glamorganshire, and who was prevented by gout from shooting and fishing, began rebuilding the house in the Tudor Revival style as a way of occupying himself; continued to live in the old house while the new buildings went up gradually behind it only moving out of it about ten years later when it was engulfed by the new work and demolished.

To a certain extent Lord and Lady Dunraven acted as their own architects, helped by a master mason named James Conolly; and making as much use as they could of local craftsmen, notably a talented carver. At the same time, however, they employed a professional architect, James Pain; and in 1846, when the house was 3/4 built, they commissioned A.W. Pugin to design some of the interior features of the great hall. Finally, between 1850 and 1862, after the death of the second Earl, his son, the 3rd Earl [Edwin Richard Wyndham-Quin (1812-1871)], a distinguished Irish archaeologist, completed the house by building the principal garden front, to the design of P.C. [Philip Charles] Hardwick. The house, as completed, is a picturesque and impressive grey stone pile, composed of various elements that are rather loosely tied together; some of them close copies of Tudor originals in England, thus the turreted entrance tower, which stands rather incongruously at one corner of the front instead of in the middle, is a copy of the entrance to the Cloister Court at Eton.

Adare Manor, Limerick, October 2012.
Adare Manor, Limerick

Bence-Jones continues: “The detail, however, is of excellent quality; and the whole great building is full of interest, and abounds in those historical allusions which so appealed to early-Victorians of the stamp of the second Earl, his wife and son. As might be expected, Hardwick’s front is more architecturally correct than the earlier parts of the house, but less inspired; a rather heavy three storey asymmetrical composition of oriels and mullioned windows, relieved by a Gothic cloister at one end and dominated by an Irish-battlemented tower with a truncated pyramidal roof, surmounted by High-Victorian decorative iron cresting.

Adare Manor, Limerick, October 2012.
Adare Manor, Limerick:Irish-battlemented tower with a truncated pyramidal roof, surmounted by High-Victorian decorative iron cresting.

The Archiseek website tells us:

The structure is a series of visual allusions to famous Irish and English homes that the Dunravens admired. It is replete with curious eccentricities such as the turreted entrance tower at one corner rather than in the centre, 52 chimneys to commemorate each week of the year, 75 fireplaces and 365 leaded glass windows. The lettered text carved into the front of the south parapet reads: “Except the Lord build the house, the labour is but lost that built it.” The elaborate decoration is a miracle of stonework – arches, gargoyles, chimneys and bay windows. The interior spaces are designed on a grand scale. One of the most renowned interior spaces is the Minstrel’s Gallery: 132 foot long, 26-1/2 foot high expanse inspired by the Hall of Mirrors in Versailles and lined on either side with 17th Century Flemish Choir Stalls. 

Other architects to have collaborated with the Earl include Lewis [Nockalls] Cottingham, Philip Charles Hardwick, and possibly A.W.N Pugin who designed a staircase and ceiling.” [17]

Adare Manor, Limerick: The lettered text carved into the front of the south parapet reads: “Except the Lord build the house, the labour is but lost that built it.” O’Reilly tells us that “The ornamental carving at Adare is one of the earliest manifestations of a survival – or perhaps revival – in Ireland of ancient carving traditions. This same tradition would shape the future of the Gothic revival in Ireland, and make the nineteenth century one of the most creative periods in the whole history of the nation’s architecture. Two names in particular are associated with the stonework over the 1830s and early 1840s, James Conolly and Michael Donoghue, but it remains uncertain as to which of them, if either, deserves the major credit.”
Adare Manor, Limerick, 2012.
Adare Manor, Photograph from National Inventory of Architectural Heritage.
Adare Manor, Photograph from National Inventory of Architectural Heritage.
Adare Manor, Photograph from National Inventory of Architectural Heritage.
An inscription in Gothic lettering on the south front of the manor reads “This goodly house was erected by Windham Henry Earl of Dunraven and Caroline his Countess without borrowing, selling or leaving a debt.” Photograph from National Inventory of Architectural Heritage.
Adare Manor, Photograph from National Inventory of Architectural Heritage.
Adare Manor, Photograph from National Inventory of Architectural Heritage.
Adare Manor, Photograph from National Inventory of Architectural Heritage.
Adare Manor, Photograph from National Inventory of Architectural Heritage.
Adare Manor, Photograph from National Inventory of Architectural Heritage.
Adare Manor, Photograph from National Inventory of Architectural Heritage.

Mark Bence-Jones continues: “The entrance hall has doorways of grey marble carved in the Irish Romanesque style; the ceiling is timbered, the doors are covered in golden Spanish leather. The great hall beyond, for which Pugin provided designs, is a room of vast size and height, divided down the middle by a screen of giant Gothic arches of stone, and with similar arches in front of the staircase, so that there are Gothic vistas in all directions. A carved oak minstrels’ gallery runs along one side; originally there was also an organ-loft. From the landing of the stairs, a vaulted passage constitutes the next stage in the romantic and devious approach to the grandest room in the house, the long gallery, which was built before the great hall, in 1830s; it is 132 feet long and 26 feet high with a timbered roof; along the walls are carved C17 Flemish choir stalls and there is a great deal of other woodcarving, including C15 carved panelling in the door.

The other principal reception rooms are in Hardwick’s garden front; they have ceilings of Tudor Revival plasterwork and elaborately carved marble chimneypieces; that in the drawingroom having been designed by Pugin.

Hall of Adare Manor, Limerick, October 2012. Augustus Welby Northmore Pugin designed the shield bearing ravens that sit on top of the newel posts on the stairs in the Great Hall.
Hall of Adare Manor, Limerick, October 2012.

Sean O’Reilly writes in his book Irish Houses and Gardens. From the Archives of  Country Life.

Nowhere is the creativity of Adare more apparent than in the Great Hall and its associated spaces. Enclosed by screens of giant and more modest arches, round and pointed, surrounded by corridors, staircases and steps flying in an apparently conflicting succession of directions, and with galleries breaking through walls, not to mention the ubiquitous antlers of the Irish elk, the great hall was one of the most picturesque interiors of its day. Lady Dunraven described the room as being ‘peculiarly adapted to every purpose for which it may be required,’ observing that ‘it has been frequently used with equal appropriateness as a dining room, concert-room, ballroom, for private theatricals, tableaux vivants and other amusements.’ ” [18]

In 1834 the Dunravens visited Antwerp and purchased the woodcarvings to adorn the gallery. In 1835 they purchased a highly carved and decorative choir stall from St. Paul’s church in Antwerp. Local woodcarvers in Limerick then made an exact copy of the seventeenth century original in order to form a pair.

Inside Adare Manor, Limerick, October 2012: The Gallery.
The Gallery, Adare Manor, Limerick

O’Reilly writes: “If the hall is the most complex space, the most dramatic is the gallery, a huge timber-roofed space rising through two storeys and stretching nearly forty-five metres. With its architectural details, pictures and furnishings, the idea, as Cornforth so well expressed it, was to ‘create 250 years of history overnight.’ The family history from the twelfth century is traced in Willement’s stained glass and portraits – both family heirlooms and acquisitions – which carry the story through in more intimate, if also more vague terms. Seventeenth century Flemish stalls, purchased by the Dunravens during their Continental tour of 1834-36, add to the ambiguous combination of old and new.” [18]

Adare Manor, Limerick: 15th century carved panelling in the door. In 1835 the Dunravens purchased a highly carved and decorative choir stall from St. Paul’s church in Antwerp. Local woodcarvers in Limerick then made an exact copy of the seventeenth century original in order to form a pair.
The Gallery, Adare Manor, Limerick: Seventeenth century Flemish stalls, purchased by the Dunravens during their Continental tour of 1834-36.
The Gallery, Adare Manor, Limerick: 15th century carved panelling in the door. 
The Gallery, Adare Manor, Limerickchimneypieces were designed by Pugin.
The Gallery, Adare Manor, Limerick

O’Reilly adds: “It was Pugin’s successor, the English architect P.C. Hardwick, who developed the next and final major phase of work at Adare. This involved the laying out of the surrounding terraces, and the completion of the southern range, that which looks across to the river and occupies the site of the original classical house. Although Hardwick’s work embodies the professional finish of the later nineteenth century, it possesses none of the amateur exuberance of the earlier work. Yet his patron, the 3rd Earl, was to establish himself as one of the foremost authorities of Irish antiquities. He was a friend of the celebrated Irish antiquary George Petrie, and collated the material for the posthumously published Notes on Irish Antiquities, one of the most significant antiquarian publications of the century.” [18]

The principal reception rooms in Hardwick’s garden front have ceilings of Tudor Revival plasterwork and elaborately carved marble chimneypieces, that in the drawing room was designed by Pugin. The drawing room, library and other reception rooms in the garden front only came into use for the coming of age of the future fourth Earl of Dunraven in 1862. The third Earl married Augusta Charlotte Gould, whose grandmother was Mary Quin, daughter of Valentine Quinn who built the first house at Adare. Augusta’s sister Caroline married Robert Gore-Booth, 4th Baronet of Lissadell, County Sligo, a section 482 property.

Adare Manor, Limerick, 2012. The other principal reception rooms are in Hardwick’s garden front; they have ceilings of Tudor Revival plasterwork and elaborately carved marble chimneypieces; that in the drawing room having been designed by Pugin. 

A daughter of the 3rd Earl, Mary Frances, married Arthur Hugh Smith-Barry, 1st and last Baron Barrymore of Fota House in County Cork (see my entry https://irishhistorichouses.com/2022/01/19/office-of-public-works-properties-munster/ )

The 4th Earl had no sons and he was succeeded by his cousin, Windham Henry Wyndham-Quin (1857-1952), grandson of the 2nd Earl of Dunraven. He lived at Adare for twenty-six years, until his death in 1952. He was married to Eva Constance Aline Bourke, daughter of the 6th Earl of Mayo. It was their son, Richard Southwell Windham Robert Wyndham-Quin, 6th Earl of Dunraven and Mount-Earl, who made the difficult decision to sell Adare Manor due to difficult economic climate of the 1980s in Ireland. It took a while to find a suitable buyer. Unable to bear the expense of maintaining Adare Manor, the 7th Earl sold it and its contents in 1984.

Adare Manor, Limerick, 2012.
Adare Manor, Limerick, 2012.
Adare Manor, Limerick, 2012.
Adare Manor, Limerick, 2012.
Adare Manor, Limerick, breakfast room, 2012.
Adare Manor, Limerick, 2012.
Adare Manor, Limerick, 2012.

Mark Bence-Jones adds: “The house stands close to the River Maigue surrounded by a splendid desmesne in which there is a Desmond castle, and a ruined medieval Franciscan friary; one of three monastic buildings at Adare, the other two having been restored as the Catholic and Protestant churches.” 

Ruined medieval Franciscan friary at Adare Manor, Limerick, 2012.
Veteran’s Memorial, Adare Manor, Limerick
Adare Manor, Limerick, veterans memorial

Among the trees southwest of the Manor House are Ogham Stones, which were brought to Adare Manor from Kerry by Edwin, the 3rd Earl of Dunraven. Ogham Stones date from the early 5th Century to the middle of the 7th Century. They are mainly Christian in context and are usually associated with old churches or early Christian burial sites. Ogham inscriptions are in an early form of Irish, frequently followed by Latin inscriptions and often read from the bottom upwards.

Ogham stones at Adare Manor, Limerick.

2. Ash Hill, Kilmallock, Co Limerick – section 482, Hidden Ireland accommodation €

www.ashhill.com 

See above in “places to visit.”

Ashill Towers, taken  c.1865-1914 by Robert French, Lawrence Photographic Collection, National Library of Ireland, flickr constant commons.

3. Ballyteigue House, Bruree, County Limerick – self-catering whole house accommodation, rental per week. €€ for two, € for 4-10

Ballyteigue House, County Limerick, photograph from National Inventory of Architectural Heritage.

The National Inventory tells us it is a three-bay two-storey country house, built c. 1850, having later porch to front (south).

http://www.ballyteigue.com/

Ballyteigue House accommodation Limerick can accommodate nine people comfortably and there is a Courtyard Cottage which can accommodate an extra 6 people.

The House available for holiday lettings consists of 5 Bedrooms, 4 double or twin, and a single room. All rooms have their own bathroom.

Bruree is where President De Valera spent the early part of his life and went to school.

4. Deebert House, Kilmallock, County Limerick – B&B and self-catering http://www.deeberthouse.com/

The National Inventory tells us it was built in 1804.

5. The Dunraven, Adare, Co Limerick € 

https://www.dunravenhotel.com/

6. Flemingstown House, Kilmallock, Co. Limerick, Ireland  whole house accommodation, up to 11 guests. €€€ for two for a week, € for 4-11

https://flemingstownhouse.com

plus self-catering cottage for up to 4 people.

7. Longcourt House Hotel, Newcastle West, Co Limerick €

https://www.longcourthousehotel.ie/our-story/

“It is a vibrant property and the teams behind it are equally passionate and dedicated to the hotel and guests who frequent it. Jim & Mary Long are the proprietors, who purchased the property in 2014 and lovingly restored it and redeveloped it for its opening in December 2017. They are both from West Limerick but reside in London and have always maintained their strong connections to the area and frequent visitors to the hotel and their extended family and friends.”

8. Woodlands House and Spa, Adare, Co Limerick € or €€

https://www.woodlands-hotel.ie/home/history/

Fitzgeralds Woodlands House Hotel & Spa, which is a founding member of Original Irish Hotels, began life more than 40 years ago as a four-bedroomed bed and breakfast (B&B) run by Mary and Dick (RIP) Fitzgerald as a way to supplement their farming income.  Today, it is an 89-room award-winning four-star hotel employing more than 200 people.”

Whole house rental County Limerick

1. Ballyteigue House, Bruree, County Limerick – self-catering whole house accommodation, rental per week. €€ for two, € for 4-10 – see above

2. Fanningstown Castle, Adare, County Limerick – sleeps 10

https://fanningstowncastle.com/

3. Flemingstown House, Kilmallock, Co. Limerick, Ireland – whole house accommodation, up to 11 guests – see above

https://flemingstownhouse.com

plus self-catering cottage for up to 4 people.

4. Glin Castle, County Limerick – whole house rental.

Glin Castle, County Limerick, photograph from National Inventory of Architectural Heritage.

https://www.glin-castle.com/

You can see lovely photographs of the castle, inside and out, on the website.

The website tells us: “The castle comprises 5 exquisite reception rooms filled with a unique collection of Irish 18th century furniture. The entrance hall with a screen of Corinthian pillars has a superb Neo-classical plaster ceiling and the enfilade of reception rooms are filled with a unique collection of Irish 18th century mahogany furniture. Family portraits and Irish pictures line the walls, and the library bookcase has a secret door leading to the hall and the very rare flying staircase.

Upstairs there are 15+ individually decorated bedrooms, each with its own private bathroom. Colourful rugs and chaise longues stand at the end of comforting plump beds. Pictures and blue and white porcelain adorn the walls. The bedrooms at the back of the castle overlook the garden, while those at the front have a view of the river.

Glin Castle, County Limerick, photograph from National Inventory of Architectural Heritage.
Glin Castle, County Limerick, photograph from National Inventory of Architectural Heritage.

The website tells us of the history:

The FitzGeralds first settled here in the 1200’s at nearby Shanid Castle following the Norman invasion of Ireland. Their war cry was Shanid Abu!  (Shanid forever in Gaelic). In the early 14th century the Earl of Desmond, head of the Geraldines, made hereditary Knights of 3 illegitimate sons he had sired with the wives of various Irish chieftains, creating them the White Knight, the Green Knight of Kerry and the Black Knight of Glin. For seven centuries they defended their lands against the troops of Elizabeth I, and during the Cromwellian plantation and Penal laws.

Coming into the hall with its Corinthian columns and elaborate plaster ceiling in the neo­ classical style, one can see straight ahead among a series of family portraits, some already mentioned, the picture of Colonel John FitzGerald [(1765-1803)the 23rd Knight of Glin], the builder of the house, wearing the uniform of his volunteer regiment the Royal Glin Artillery. In his portrait, which hangs over the Portland stone chimneypiece, he is proudly pointing at his cannon. In May 1779 Colonel John’s father, Thomas FitzGerald, whose portrait in a blue coat is on the left of the dining room door, wrote to Edmund Sexton Pery the Speaker of the Irish House of Commons to warn him that a French naval invasion was expected off the coast. There were rumours that the American privateer Paul Jones had sailed up the Shannon to Tarbert after he had defeated an English ship in Belfast Lough in the summer of 1779. France and Spain had declared war on England and were supporting the American colonists in the War of Independence. Panic spread among the gentry and nobility of Ireland in case the country should be left unprotected in the face of an invasion, and the Irish Volunteer Regiments were raised between 1778 and 1783-40,000 men having been enrolled by 1779 and 100,000 by 1782. Inspired by the success of the Americans and with the strength of the Volunteers behind them, Henry Grattan and his Patriot Party demanded legislative independence for Ireland from Britain following their achievement of the abolition of trade restrictions in 1778. These stirring optimistic times were the background to the building of Glin.” 

Glin Castle, County Limerick, photograph from National Inventory of Architectural Heritage.

The website continues: “The new prosperity of the country was reflected in a great deal of public and private building and the accompanying extensive landscaping and tree planting showed the pride of Ireland’s ruling classes in their newly won but brief national independence-an independence which was shaken by the French Revolution and finally shattered by the Rebellion of 1798 and the ensuing Union with England in 1800. Colonel John supported this Union, though his faith in King and Country had faltered under the influence of his United Irishman brother, Gerald during the 1798 Rebellion, when his kinsman Lord Edward FitzGerald is said to have stayed at Glin. Colonel John had no political influence as all the local boroughs were in the hands of the new English settler families. This meant that unlike so many of them he did not spend money on a large Dublin house and thereby concentrated on cutting a greater dash at home. 

Unfortunately, we have no direct information about who designed the house or the identity of the craftsmen who styled the superb woodwork such as the mahogany library bookcase with its concealed secret door, the inlaid stair-rail, the flying staircase, or the intricate plaster ceilings. This is because many of the family papers were burned by the so-called ‘Cracked Knight’ in the 1860s. Tradition tells us that the stone for the house was brought across the hills from a quarry in nearby Athea on horse-drawn sleds by a ‘strongman’ contractor called Sheehy. This is the only name connected with the building of the house that has come down to us. 

It seems likely that Colonel John started his house sometime in the 1780s as he obviously used the same masons and carpenters as were used for two houses adjoining each other in Henry Street, Limerick, one built for the Bishop of Limerick, later Lord Glentworth, and the other for his elder brother the Speaker of the Irish House of Commons, Viscount Pery. These Limerick houses were finished by 1784 and it would seem not unlikely that they are the work of a good local carpenter /builder. Colonel John may well have been his own architect working with the excellent craftsmen that Limerick could obviously produce. The neo-classical plasterwork of the hall is possibly an exception as it is close to the work of two Dublin stuccadores, Charles Thorpe or Michael Stapleton. The motifs on the frieze reminds us of the Volunteer enthusiasm of the house for the military trophies, shields sprouting shamrocks and the full bosomed Irish harp which are to be seen on the hall ceiling all underline Colonel John’s patriotism. The French horn and the music book also reminds us that this hall doubled up as a ballroom; the music undoubtedly being played by the musicians from the artillery band. Colonel John loved music and had been taught the flute by a Gaelic music and dancing master, Seań Bán Aerach Ó Flanagán. The house stands on the banks of the widest part of the river Shannon and the snub nosed dolphins and tridents in· the corners of the main hall ceiling symbolise water, while flower-laden cornucopiae and ears of wheat represent the fruitful grasslands that surround the newly built mansion. Oval plaques with their Pompeian red background portray Roman soldiers depicting war and other figures characterise peace and justice. All this symbolism reminds us of contemporary events in the sea girt island of Ireland. This magnificent ceiling retains much of its original 18th century colouring. 

Glin Castle, County Limerick, photograph from National Inventory of Architectural Heritage.
Glin Castle, County Limerick, photograph from National Inventory of Architectural Heritage.

In 1789 Colonel John married his beautiful English wife, the daughter of a rich west country squire, and her coat-of-arms are impaled with his on the hall ceiling. Her portrait hangs above her husbands to the right of the drawing room door in the hall. Her coat-of-arms on the ceiling suggests that the house was still being decorated in 1789 although the money must have been beginning to run out, because work was stopped short on the third floor, and walls remained scored for plaster and pine doors are unpainted to this day. Financial problems must have marred their brief decade together at Glin as in 1791 the Dublin La Touche Bank called in their debts going back as far as 1736 and took a case to Parliament. In June 1801 a private Act of Parliament in Westminster was passed to force part of the Glin estate to be sold in order to pay off the many ‘incumbrances’ which had accrued through the 18th century. This document mentions that Colonel John had expended ‘Six thousand pounds and upward in building a mansion house and offices and making plantations and other valuable and lasting improvements…’. Comparing costs with other roughly contemporary buildings shows us that the cut stone Custom House in Limerick cost £8,000 in 1779 and Mornington House, one of Dublin’s largest houses, was sold for the same sum in 1791, so £6,000 ‘and upwards’ was a substantial sum in those days. Colonel John’s wife Margaretta Maria Fraunceis died at one of her father’s properties, Combe Florey in Somerset a few months after the Act was passed. In 1802, 5,000 acres of Glin were sold, and Colonel John himself died in 1803 leaving an only son, and heir aged 12. In June 1803 the local newspaper the Limerick Chronicle advertised sales of the household furniture, the library, , ‘a superb service of India china’, but no pictures or silver. The hall chairs and amorial sideboard in the hall survived because of their family associations but carriages, farm stock, and ‘the fast-sailing sloop The Farmer, her cabin neatly fitted up’ followed. The FitzGeralds of Glin were almost bankrupt.

It was only because of the long minority of John Fraunceis FitzGerald, the son and heir, and the fact that there were no younger children to provide for, which saw the estate on to 1812 when he attained his majority. Educated at Winchester and Cambridge he regained the family fortunes by successful gambling and though he married an English clergyman’s daughter with no great dower, he built the various Gothic lodges and added the battlements and sugar icing detail to the old Glin House making it into the ‘cardboard castle’ that it is today. This would have been typical of the romantic notions of the 1820s and he obviously thought that the holder of such an ancient title should be living in a castle like his medieval ancestors.

Glin Castle, County Limerick, photograph from National Inventory of Architectural Heritage.

The top floor was never completed and other than further planting, little else was done to Glin for over a hundred years as money was scarce during the Victorian period. Over 5,000 acres were sold by 1837 and for the rest of the century the estate consisted of 5,836 acres and the town of Glin. The rent roll came to between £3,000 and £3,800 a year but with mortgages, windows jointures, and other family charges there was in 1858 a surplus of only £777 16s. 5d. brought in from the estate. Not included in this would have been the income from the salmon weirs on the Shannon. Lack of money may have been a blessing in disguise for there were few Victorian improvements at Glin though the Dublin firm of Sibthorpe redecorated the staircase ceiling and added Celtic revival monograms in two roundels and carried out some stencil work in the library and smoking room. This work would have been done in the 1860s probably at the same time that the Protestant church at the gate was being rebuilt.

From “In Harmony with Nature, The Irish Country House Garden 1600-1900” in the Irish Georgian Society, July 2022, curated by Robert O’Byrne.

5. Springfield Castle, Drumcollogher, Co. Limerick, Ireland €€€ for 2, € for 5-25.

Springfield Castle, County Limerick, photograph from National Inventory of Architectural Heritage.

https://www.springfieldcastle.com 

The website tells us: “Springfield Castle is situated in the heart of County Limerick on a magical 200 acre wooded estate and is approached along a magnificent three quarter mile long avenue, lined with ancient lime trees. Enjoy an exclusive relaxing stay in a one of a kind castle.

Accommodation for up to 25 people in a unique Irish castle we are the perfect place for your vacation, family gathering or boutique wedding in Ireland. It is the ideal place to stay in an Irish castle, Springfield is centrally located allowing you to explore many of Ireland’s fantastic gems including the Wild Atlantic Way. It is a one of a kind place where you can unwind and relax.

Springfield castle is owned By Robert Fitzmaurice Deane the 9th Baron of Muskerry. Robert and his wife Rita are regular visitors. Robert has funded the ongoing restoration in Springfield since 2006, most recently of the garden cottage where he and Rita stay when visiting Ireland.

Mark Bence-Jones writes (1988):

p. 263. “(Petty-Fitzmaurice, sub Lansdowne, M/PB; Deane, Muskerry, B/PB) A three storey C18 house adjoining a large C16 tower house of the FitzGeralds, later bought by the Fitzmaurices, whose heiress married Sir Robert Deane, 6th Bt, afterwards 1st Lord Muskerry, 1775. …A two storey C19 Gothic wing with pinnacle buttresses was added at one end of C18 block, extending along one side of the old castle bawn, a smaller tower at another and outbuildings along two of the remaining sides to form a courtyard. 20C entrance gates and lodge in the New Zealand Maori style. C18 house was burnt 1923 and new house was afterwards made out of C19 Gothic wing, which was extended in the same style.” 

Springfield Castle, County Limerick, photograph from National Inventory of Architectural Heritage.
Springfield Castle, County Limerick, photograph from National Inventory of Architectural Heritage.

The National Inventory tells us it is a “Gothic Revival style country house with courtyard complex, commenced c. 1740, comprising attached eight-bay two-storey country house, rebuilt c. 1925, having single-bay three-stage entrance tower. Earlier two-bay three-storey wing to side (east) having single-bay three-stage gate tower with integral camber-headed carriage arch. Tooled limestone octagonal corner turrets with pinnacles to front (south) elevation of wing gate tower, rendered octagonal turrets and pinnacles to side (west) elevation of main block. Two-bay two-storey double-pile over basement block to rear (north) incorporating possibly earlier three-stage tower to north-west. Additional lean-to stairwell block to side (west) elevation of extension block.

This impressive country house is situated in a picturesque location with extensive panoramic views of the surrounding countryside. The house and courtyard complex are the ancestral home of Lord and Lady Muskerry and occupies the site of an old bawn associated with the sixteenth-century tower house. The first record of a castle at Springfield is dated to 1280, when the Norman Fitzgeralds arrived. A visible mark to the tower house represents part of the roof line of an earlier eighteenth-century mansion that was built by John Fitzmaurice, a grandson of the 20th Lord of Kerry. Sir Robert Deane [1745-1818] married Ann Fitzmaurice in 1780, the sole heiress of Springfield and was a year later awarded the title Baron Muskerry. This mansion was burnt in 1921 by the IRA who were afraid that the occupying Black and Tans were going to convert the buildings into a garrison. The current house was rebuilt by ‘Bob’ Muskerry, the 5th Baron and follows the Gothic Revival style of the nineteenth century, with characteristic pinnacled turrets to the house and main entrance. The castellated entrance towers with tooled stone forming the main fabric of the turrets and a grand entrance door greatly enliven the façade of the building. The fine Gothic Revival style gate tower provides a glorious entrance to the substantial courtyard. A large variety of outbuildings display great skill and craftsmanship with well executed rubble stone walls and numerous carriage arches helping to maintain the historic character of the site. A curious mechanised clock controlling a mechanical calendar, lunar calendar and a bell constructed by the current owner’s great grand uncle is a mechanical masterpiece of great technical interest. Coupled with the archaeological monuments, this complex has a significant architectural value at a national level.

The website tells us about the history:

Steeped in history, it is the ancestral home of Lord and Lady Muskerry, whose motto Forti et fideli nihil dificile which means “nothing is difficult to the strong and faithful” underlies over 700 years of family history.

The earliest castle at Gort na Tiobrad, the Irish name for Springfield Castle, is reputed to date from 1280 when one of the Fitzgeralds, a junior member of the Earl of Desmond’s family, married a lady of the O Coilleains, who were the Gaelic Lords of Claonghlais. He took the title Lord of Claonghlais and subsequently built a castle at Springfield. The Tower house and build circa 1480. This was the beginning of a long association of the Fitzgeralds with the area. They were patrons to Irish poets and musicians.As you enter the impressive gateway to Springfield Castle a plaque on the wall commemorates Daithi O’Bruadair, a classical Irish poet of the seventeenth century who lived at the castle with his patrons, the Fitzgerald family, recording their lives (and general events). He described Springfield Castle as “a mansion abounding in poetry, prizes and people”

The Fitzgeralds soon became, as the saying goes “more Irish than the Irish themselves” and had an oft-times difficult relationship with the British monarchy. In 1691 they had their lands confiscated for the third and last time and Sir John Fitzgerald went to France with Sir Patrick Sarsfield to continue fighting the English there, never to return to Ireland. A younger son of the 20th Lord of Kerry, William Fitzmaurice [1670-1710], (cousins to the Fitzgeralds) then bought Springfield castle. His son, John, built a very large 3 story early Georgian mansion attached to the existing buildings. The Fitzmaurices occupied Springfield Castle until Sir Robert Deane married Ann Fitzmaurice, the sole heiress, in 1780. He was awarded the title Baron Muskerry in 1781 and the title Lord Muskerry has stayed at Springfield Castle to this day. The castle was burnt in 1921 during the war of Independence and rebuilt by “Bob” Muskerry the 5th Baron in 1929. The 9th Baron, Robert Fitzmaurice Deane, lives and works in South Africa at present, and started restoring the castle in 2006. Robert’s sister Betty, her husband Jonathan and their children Karen and Daniel run Springfield Castle and look forward to meeting you.

[1] https://www.buildingsofireland.ie/buildings-search/building/21813051/ash-hill-stud-ash-hill-kilmallock-co-limerick

[2] Bence-Jones, Mark. A Guide to Irish Country Houses (originally published as Burke’s Guide to Country Houses volume 1 Ireland by Burke’s Peerage Ltd. 1978); Revised edition 1988 Constable and Company Ltd, London.

[3] https://www.buildingsofireland.ie/buildings-search/building/21803033/brackvoan-bruff-limerick

[4] https://www.buildingsofireland.ie/buildings-search/building/21902807/glenville-house-glenville-ardagh-co-limerick

[5] https://www.limerick.ie/discover/eat-see-do/history-heritage/historic-attractions/glenquin-castle

[6] https://theirishaesthete.com/2021/09/13/glenquin-castle/

[7] https://www.irelandscontentpool.com/en

[8] https://www.countrylifeimages.co.uk/Search.aspx?s=glenstall

[9] https://landedfamilies.blogspot.com/search/label/Ireland?updated-max=2020-04-02T14:59:00%2B01:00&max-results=20&start=5&by-date=false

[10] p. 171, O’Reilly, Sean. Irish Houses and Gardens. From the Archives of  Country Life. Aurum Press Ltd, London, 1998. 

[11] http://landedestates.nuigalway.ie/LandedEstates/jsp/property-list.jsp?letter=K

[12] https://archiseek.com/2009/king-johns-castle-limerick/

[13] http://www.britainirelandcastles.com/Ireland/County-Limerick/King-Johns-Castle.html

[14] https://www.buildingsofireland.ie/buildings-search/building/21903717/odell-ville-ballynarooga-beg-limerick

[15] http://landedestates.nuigalway.ie/LandedEstates/jsp/property-list.jsp?letter=M

[16] http://lordbelmontinnorthernireland.blogspot.com/2014/12/mount-trenchard-house.html

[17] https://archiseek.com/2009/adare-manor-co-limerick/

[18] p. 160. O’Reilly, Sean. Irish Houses and Gardens. From the Archives of  Country Life. Aurum Press Ltd, London, 1998. 

2022 Section 482 and Other Places to visit and stay: summary list

I am compiling a list of Historic Houses open for visits.

I am working on fuller descriptions with photographs of places that may not be Section 482 but may be open to the public on specific dates, and will be publishing these soon, probably by Province, as I did for the Office of Public Works properties.

Some big houses are now hotels or b&bs, and may be possible to visit, so I am including them on this list [in red]. This list is neither exhaustive nor necessarily accurate – check listing in advance to see if they are still open to the public.

Here is the Summary List – I hope it will be useful for you for trips around the country, including Northern Ireland which is a treasure trove! Let me know if you have any other recommendations!

I am listing the Section 482 properties in purple to distinguish them from other places to visit. On the map, what I call “whole house accommodation,” by which I mean for 10 or more guests, such as wedding venues, are marked in orange.

For places to stay, I have made a rough estimate of prices at time of publication: 

€ = up to approximately €150 per night for two people sharing; 

€€ – up to approx €250 per night for two; 

€€€ – over €250 per night for two.

Antrim:

1. Antrim Castle and Clotworthy House, County Antrim – estate and gardens open to the public, the Castle was destroyed by fire. The stable block, built in the 1840s and now known as Clotworthy House, is used as an arts centre.

https://discovernorthernireland.com/things-to-do/antrim-castle-gardens-and-clotworthy-house-p704051

2. Belfast Castle estate , County Antrim

https://discovernorthernireland.com/things-to-do/belfast-castle-estate-p676051

3. Carrickfergus Castle, County Antrim

https://discovernorthernireland.com/things-to-do/carrickfergus-castle-p674971

4. Dunluce Castle (ruin), County Antrim

https://discovernorthernireland.com/things-to-do/dunluce-castle-medieval-irish-castle-on-the-antrim-coast-p675011

5. Galgorm Castle, County Antrim – now part of a golf club.

https://www.galgormcastle.com/galgorm-estate.html

6. Glenarm Castle, County Antrim – private, can book a tour

https://glenarmcastle.com

Glenarm Castle & Garden, photo by Donal Maloney 2021 for Tourism Ireland [1]

Dates are limited and booking in advance is required.  

7. Lissanoure Castle, County Antrim – private, wedding venue

https://lissanourecastle.com

George MacCartney, 1st and last Earl Macartney, lived at Lissanoure Castle, is an ancestor of my husband, Stephen! His mother was a Winder.

8. Malone House, Belfast, County Antrim – wedding and conference venue

https://discovernorthernireland.com/things-to-do/malone-house-p674831

9. Wilmont House (park only), Sir Thomas and Lady Dixon Rose Gardens.

https://discovernorthernireland.com/things-to-do/sir-thomas-and-lady-dixon-park-p674891

Places to stay. Count Antrim: 

1. Ballyealy Cottage, Castle Shane Estate, County Antrim €€ for two, € for 3-5

https://www.irishlandmark.com/propertytag/cottages-and-houses/?gclid=Cj0KCQiApL2QBhC8ARIsAGMm-KFInICcRSxwLSiDxfFNk5WFytNcVrLvOQYhzJbIBes4V-M65iXz0gYaAln_EALw_wcB

2. Ballygally Castle, Larne, County Antrim 

https://www.hastingshotels.com/ballygally-castle/?gclid=CjwKCAjwybyJBhBwEiwAvz4G7w8_p7MWKXCL6Vrjer6k5D4AaaJg8CVSfc31wnqzX2CTqPmXQcBoLBoCez8QAvD_BwE

3. Ballylough House, County Antrim 

https://ballyloughbnb.co.uk

4. Drum Gate Lodge, Ballylough House, Bushmills, County Antrim €€

https://www.irishlandmark.com/propertytag/cottages-and-houses/?gclid=Cj0KCQiApL2QBhC8ARIsAGMm-KFInICcRSxwLSiDxfFNk5WFytNcVrLvOQYhzJbIBes4V-M65iXz0gYaAln_EALw_wcB

5. Blackhead Cutter Lighthouse keeper’s house, Whitehead, County Antrim €€ for two, € for 4/5 https://www.irishlandmark.com/property/blackhead-cutter/

3 houses: https://www.irishlandmark.com/properties/

6. Culloden Estate and Spa, Bangor Road, Holywood, Belfast, BT18 0EX €€€ https://www.cullodenestateandspa.com

The website tells us Colloden was originally built as an official palace for the Bishops of Down. The Culloden Estate and Spa stands in twelve acres of secluded gardens and woodland.

5. Dunadry Hotel, County Antrim €€

https://www.originalirishhotels.com

8. Barbican, Glenarm Castle, County Antrim €€

https://www.irishlandmark.com/property/the-barbican/

9. Kilmore House, County Antrim

https://kilmorecountryhouse.com

10. Kiln Wing, Old Corn Mill, Bushmills, County Antrim €€

https://www.irishlandmark.com/property/kiln-wing-old-corn-mill/

11. Larchfield Estate, Lisburn, Co Antrim, BT27 6XJ, Northern Irelandhttps://www.larchfieldestate.co.uk/staying-over

12. Lissanoure Estate cottages: all currently let

https://lissanourecastle.com/the-estate/

13. Magherintemple Gate Lodge, Ballycastle, County Antrim €€ for 2; € for 3/4

https://www.irishlandmark.com/propertytag/cottages-and-houses/?gclid=Cj0KCQiApL2QBhC8ARIsAGMm-KFInICcRSxwLSiDxfFNk5WFytNcVrLvOQYhzJbIBes4V-M65iXz0gYaAln_EALw_wcB

14. Merchant Hotel, Belfast €€€

https://www.themerchanthotel.com/our-history

The Merchant Hotel – Front Entrance, Courtesy of Merchant Hotel, Belfast 2017, Ireland’s Content Pool (see [1]).

15. Old Bushmills Barn, 15 Priestlands Road, Antrim €€€ for two; € for four

https://www.theoldbushmillsbarn.com

16. Portbradden Cottage, Bushmills, County Antrim

17. Strand House, Ballymena, County Antrim 

18. Tullymurry House, Banbridge, County Antrim, whole house rental: €€€ for two; € for 3-8

https://www.irishlandmark.com/propertytag/cottages-and-houses/?gclid=Cj0KCQiApL2QBhC8ARIsAGMm-KFInICcRSxwLSiDxfFNk5WFytNcVrLvOQYhzJbIBes4V-M65iXz0gYaAln_EALw_wcB

19. Whitepark House, 150 Whitepark Road, Ballintoy, County Antrim, BT54 6NH €€

http://www.whiteparkhouse.com/about.html

Armagh:

1. Ardress House, County Armagh

https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/ardress-house

2. The Argory, County Armagh

https://discovernorthernireland.com/things-to-do/the-argory-p675201

3. Brownlow House, County Armagh

http://www.brownlowhouse.com

4. Derrymore House, Bessbrook, County Armagh – National Trust, open to public. 

5. Milford House, Armagh

https://discovernorthernireland.com/things-to-do/milford-house-p700871 http://www.milfordhouse.org.uk

Places to Stay, County Armagh

1. Crannagael House, 43 Ardress Road, Portadown Craigavon Armagh BT62 1SE €€

Mob: +44 (0) 75 9004 7717
Mob: +44 (0) 78 3153 0155
Email: crannagaelhouse@gmail.com

https://www.crannagaelhouse.com

2. Newforge House, Magheralin, Craigavon, Co. Armagh, BT67 0QL €€

https://www.newforgehouse.com

Carlow:

1. Altamont, Kilbride, Co Carlow – gardens open to public, see OPW entry [19]

https://irishhistorichouses.com/2022/02/21/office-of-public-works-properties-leinster-carlow-kildare-kilkenny/

2. Borris House, Borris, County Carlow – section 482

See my write-up:

https://irishhistorichouses.com/2020/10/04/borris-house-county-carlow/
contact: Morgan Kavanagh
Tel: 087-2454791
www.borrishouse.com
Open: Apr 5-7, 12-14, 19-21, 26-28, May 1, 3-5, 8, 10-12, 15, 17-19, 22, 24-26, 31, July 10, 12-14, 17, 19-21, 24, 26-28, Aug 2-4, 14-25, 30-31, Sept 1, 6-8, 13-15, 20- 22, 27-29, 12 noon-4pm

Fee: adult €10, child €6, OAP/student €8

3. Carlow Castle, Carlow, Co Carlow – a ruin  

4. Duckett’s Grove, Carlow – a ruin 

maintained by Carlow County Council.

5. Garryhill House, Bagenalstown, Co Carlow – can visit gardens

https://www.discoverireland.ie/Arts-Culture-Heritage/garryhill-house/77263

6. Hardymount House, Castlemore, Co Carlow – can visit gardens

https://www.discoverireland.ie/Arts-Culture-Heritage/the-garden-hardymount-house/70913

7. Huntington Castle, Clonegal, Co Carlow – on section 482 

See my write-up:

https://irishhistorichouses.com/2019/06/28/huntington-castle-county-carlow/
Postal address: Huntington Castle, Enniscorthy, Co. Wexford
contact: Alexander Durdin Robertson
Tel: 086-0282266
www.huntingtoncastle.com
Open: Feb 5-6, 12-13, 19-20, 26-27, Mar 5-6, 12-13, 19-20, 26-27, Apr 2-3, 9-10,16- -18, 23-24, May 1-31, June 1-30, July 1-31, Aug 1-31, Sept 1-30, Oct 1-2, 8-9, 15-16, 22-31, Nov 5-6, 12-13, 19-20, 26-27, Dec 3-4, 10-11, 17-18, 11am-5pm
Fee: house/garden, adult €12, garden €6, OAP/student, house/garden €10, garden €5, child house/garden €6, garden €3, group and family discounts available

8. The Old Rectory, Killedmond, Borris, Co Carlow – section 482 

See my write-up:

https://irishhistorichouses.com/2020/07/16/the-old-rectory-killedmond-borris-co-carlow/
contact: Mary White
Tel: 087-2707189
https://www.blackstairsecotrails.ie/
Open: July 1-31, Aug 1-31, 9am-1pm
Fee: adult €10, OAP/student €6, child free.

9. Lorum Old Rectory, Kilgreaney, Bagenalstown, Co. Carlow – section 482 

contact: Bobbie Smith
Tel: 059-9775282, 087-2735237
www.lorum.com
(Tourist Accommodation Facility)

Open: April-Sept

Places to stay, County Carlow

1. Ballykealey, Tullow, Co Carlow  – whole house rental and self-catering accommodation €€€

and lodges: https://ballykealeyhouse.com

2. Coolanowle House, Coolanowle, Ballickmoyler, County Carlow

http://www.coolanowle.com

3. Huntington Castle, County Carlow – see above €

4. Killedmond Rectory, County Carlow – shepherd’s huts €

https://www.blackstairsecotrails.ie/

Shepherd’s Hut, Old Rectory Killedmond, County Carlow, October 2021.

5. Lisnavagh, County Carlow, holiday cottages

www.lisnavagh.com

6. Lorum Rectory, County Carlow – €€

www.lorum.com

7. Mount Wolseley, Tullow, Co Carlow – hotel € 

8. Sandbrook, Tullow, Co Carlow  – whole house rental and an apartment in house

https://sandbrook.ie

County Cavan

1. Cabra Castle, Kingscourt, Co. Cavan (Hotel) – section 482

see my write-up:

https://irishhistorichouses.com/2021/03/28/cabra-castle-kingscourt-county-cavan/
contact: Howard Corscadden.
Tel: 042-9667030
www.cabracastle.com
Open: all year, except Dec 24, 25, 26, 11am-4pm
Fee: Free

2. Castle Saunderson, Co. Cavan – a ruin 

https://www.thisiscavan.ie/fun/article/luanch-of-new-heritage-trail-at-castle-saunderson

3. Clough Oughter, County Cavan

https://www.discoverireland.ie/Activities-Adventure/clough-oughter-castle/48729

4. Corravahan House & Gardens, Drung, Ballyhaise, Co. Cavan – section 482

see my write-up:

https://irishhistorichouses.com/2020/08/28/corravahan-house-and-gardens-drung-county-cavan/
contact: Ian Elliott
Tel: 087-9772224
www.corravahan.com
Open: Jan 3-4, 10-11, 17-18, 24-25, 31, Feb 1, 7-8, 14-15, 21-22, 28, Mar 1, 7-8, May 1-4, 8-11, 15-18, 22-25, 29-31, Aug 13-27, 29-30, Sept 5-6, 12-13, 9am-1pm, Sundays 2pm-6pm
Fee: adult €10, OAP/student/child €5

Places to stay, County Cavan

1. Cabra Castle, on section 482 – hotel – €€

www.cabracastle.com

and lodges

2. Clover Hill Gate Lodge, Cloverhill, Belturbet, Cavan

https://www.airbnb.ie/rooms/4962376?source_impression_id=p3_1646316400_8H59V8wuqVzXlMog

3. Farnham House, Farnham Estate, Cavan – hotel €€

https://www.farnhamestate.ie

4. Killinagh House, McNean Court, Blacklion, County Cavan – whole house rental €

https://www.discoverireland.ie/accommodation/killinagh-house

and Killinagh Lodge, https://killinaghlodge.com/facilities.html

5. Lismore House, Co Cavan – was a ruin. Place to stay: Peacock House on the demesne: € https://www.airbnb.ie/rooms/27674042?source_impression_id=p3_1646316758_vwGIKKMTwiWKK%2FB7

6. Olde Post Inn, Cloverhill, County Cavan €€

https://www.theoldepostinn.com

7. Ross Castle, Co Cavan (address is in Mountnugent, County Meath) – whole castle, plus self-catering accommodation €€€ for 2, € for 10 or more

https://www.ross-castle.com

8. Slieve Russel Hotel, Cavan € 

https://www.originalirishhotels.com/destinations/irelands-ancient-east

Stands on the site of what was once Cranaghan House.

Whole House Rental, County Cavan:

1. Killinagh House, McNean Court, Blacklion, County Cavan – whole house rental

https://www.discoverireland.ie/accommodation/killinagh-house

2. Ross Castle, Co Cavan (address is in Mountnugent, County Meath) €€€ for 2, € for 10 or more

https://www.ross-castle.com

3. Virginia Park, Co Cavan – weddings only

https://www.irelands-blue-book.ie/houses.html?country=Cavan

Clare:

1. Barntick House, Clarecastle Co. Clare – section 482

contact: Ciaran Murphy
Tel: 086-1701060
Open: May 1-31, Aug 1-31, 5pm-9pm
Fee: adult/student €5, child/OAP free, group discount available.

2. Bunratty Castle, County Clare

maintained by Shannon Heritage

3. Craggaunowen Castle, Kilmurray, Sixmilebridge, Clare

– history park, maintained by Shannon Heritage, www.craggaunowen.ie

4. Dunguaire Castle, Kinvara, County Clare

Maintained by Shannon Heritage.

5. Kilrush House, Co Clare

– ‘lost’, Vandeleur Gardens open 

www.vandeleurwalledgarden.ie 

6. Knappogue Castle, County Clare

which is maintained by Shannon Heritage.

7. Loughnane’s, Main Street, Feakle, Co. Clare – section 482

contact: Billy Loughnane
Tel: 086-2565012
www.clareecolodge.ie
Open: June 1-August 31, Wed-Sun, Aug 13-21, 2pm-6pm Fee: Free

8. Mount Ievers Court, Sixmilebridge, Clare  

mountieverscourt.ie

9. Newtown Castle, Newtown, Ballyvaughan, Co. Clare – section 482

contact: Mary Hawkes- Greene
Tel: 065-7077200
www.newtowncastle.com , 
Open: Jan 10-May 31, Mon-Fri, June 1-30 Mon-Sat, July 1-Aug 31 daily, Sept 1-Dec 16 Mon-Fri, 10am-5pm
Fee: Free

10. O’Dea’s, or Dysert Castle, Co Clare

– can visit http://www.dysertcastle.com/castle.htm

Places to Stay, County Clare 

1. Ballynalacken Castle, Lisdoonvarna, Co Clare – hotel €€

https://www.ballinalackencastle.com/ 

2. Ballyhannon, County Clare – coach house accommodation €€€ or € for 15 or castle €€ for 10

www.ballyhannon-castle.com

There is a private house, a tower house castle and coach house.

The Lodge: https://www.castleferguslodge.com/

“A 19th century coach house adjacent to Ballyhannon Fortress Castle. Take a step back in time, and enjoy the unique experience of this historic landmark, at our bed and breakfast. We are at the end of a private drive, so no one will be “passing by” to interfere with your peace and tranquility.” 

The Tower House: http://rentacastleinireland.com/history.html

3. Ballyportry Castle, Corofin, County Clare € for 4-8 for one week

http://www.ballyportry.ie

Rising bluntly out of the craggy landscape, Ballyportry is the finest example in Ireland of a complete medieval Gaelic Tower House. Built in the 15th century it has been beautifully restored with careful attention being paid to retaining all its original features and style, yet with the comforts of the 21st century.”

4.  Dromoland Castle, Newmarket-on-Fergus, Co. Clare – hotel €€€

www.dromoland.ie 

5. Ennistymon House, Ennistymon, Co. Clare, now Falls Hotel €€

www.fallshotel.ie 

6. Gregan’s Castle Hotel, County Clare €€€

https://www.irelands-blue-book.ie/houses.html?country=Clare

7. Loop Head Lightkeeper’s Cottage, County Clare €€ for 2; € for 4-6

https://www.irishlandmark.com/properties/

8. Loughnane’s, Main Street, Feakle, Co Clare

contact: Billy Loughnane
Tel: 086-2565012
www.eastclarehostels.com 

9. Mount Callan House and Restaurant, Inagh, Co Clare – B&B 

https://www.mountcallanhouse.ie

10. Mount Cashel Lodge, Kilmurry, Sixmilebridge, Co Clare 

https://www.mtcashel.com

and Stables https://hiddenireland.com/stay/self-catering-holiday-rentals/

11. Newpark House, Ennis, County Clare

https://www.newparkhouse.com/rates/

12. Sheedy’s Hotel and Restaurant, County Clare €€ 

https://www.originalirishhotels.com/hotels/sheedys-country-house-hotel

13. Smithstown Castle (or Ballynagowan), Co Clare € for 4-8 for one week

http://smithstowncastle.com 

14. Spanish Point House, Spanish Point, County Clare 

https://spanishpointhouse.ie

15. Strasburgh Manor coach houses, Inch, Ennis, County Clare

https://www.strasburghmanor.com/about-strasburgh-manor/

Whole House Rental, County Clare

1. Inchiquin House, Corofin, County Clare – whole house rental €€€ for 2, € for 6-10

https://www.irishlandmark.com/propertytag/cottages-and-houses/?gclid=Cj0KCQiApL2QBhC8ARIsAGMm-KFInICcRSxwLSiDxfFNk5WFytNcVrLvOQYhzJbIBes4V-M65iXz0gYaAln_EALw_wcB

2. Mount Vernon lodge, Co Clare – whole house accommodation € for 7-11 people 

https://www.mountvernon.ie

Cork:

1. Annegrove Gardens, County Cork – OPW

See my OPW write-up. https://irishhistorichouses.com/2022/01/19/office-of-public-works-properties-munster/

2. Ashton Grove, Ballingohig, Knockraha, Co. Cork – section 482

contact: Gerald McGreal
Tel: 087-2400831
Open: Feb 10-13, 19-27, Mar 10- 13, May 5-8, 19-22, 26-29, June 9-12, 23-26, July 21-24, Aug 13-21, 25-28, Sept 1-4, 22-25, 8am-12 noon

Fee: adult €6, OAP/student/child €3

3. Ballymaloe House, Cloyne, County Cork

4. Ballynatray, Youghal, County Cork (also Waterford) – section 482

5. Ballyvolane House, Castlelyons, Co. Cork – section 482

contact: Justin Green
Tel: 025-36349
(Tourist Accommodation Facility) 

www.ballyvolanehouse.ie

Open: all year except Jan 1, Dec 24-31

6. Bantry House & Garden, Bantry, Co. Cork – section 482

contact: Julie Shelswell-White
Tel: 027-50047
www.bantryhouse.com
Open: Apr 1-Oct 31, 10am-5pm
Fee: adult €14, OAP/student €11.50, child €5, groups over 8-20, €8 and groups of 21 or more €9

Bantry House, County Cork, photograph by George Karbus, 2016 for Tourism Ireland, Ireland’s Content Pool. (see [1])

7. Blackrock Castle Observatory, Cork

8. Blarney Castle & Rock Close, Blarney, Co. Cork – section 482

contact: Charles Colthurst
Tel: 021-4385252
www.blarneycastle.ie
Open: all year except Christmas Eve & Christmas Day, Jan-Feb, Nov-Dec, 9am-4pm, Mar-Oct, 9am-5pm

Fee: adult €18, OAP/student €15, child €10, family and season passes

9. Blarney House & Gardens, Blarney, Co. Cork – section 482

contact: Charles Colthurst
Tel 021-4385252
www.blarneycastle.ie
Open: June 1-Aug 31, Mon-Sat, National Heritage Week, Aug 13-21, 10am-2pm Fee: adult €10, OAP/student €7, concession joint with castle

10. Brideweir House, Conna, Co. Cork – section 482

contact: Ronan Fox
Tel: 025-36386
www.brideweir.ie
Open: Jan 1-Dec 24, 11am-4pm
Fee: adult €10, child/student €5, OAP free

11. Burton Park, Churchtown, Mallow, Co. Cork – section 482

contact: Jess Angland
Tel: 022-59955
www.slieile.ie 

Open: May 8-July 7, Mon-Sat, closed Bank Holidays, Aug 13-21, 11am-3pm Fee: adult/child/OAP/student €9

12. Creagh House, Main Street, Doneraile, Co. Cork – section 482

contact: Michael O’Sullivan
Tel: 022-24433
(Tourist Accommodation Facility)
Open: April-Sept
Public tours of house all year

13. Desmond Castle, Kinsale, County Cork – OPW

See my OPW write-up. https://irishhistorichouses.com/2022/01/19/office-of-public-works-properties-munster/

14. Doneraile Court, County Cork – OPW

See my OPW write-up. https://irishhistorichouses.com/2022/01/19/office-of-public-works-properties-munster/

15. Drishane Castle & Gardens, Drishanemore, Millstreet Town, Co. Cork – section 482

contact: Thomas Duggan
Tel: 087-2464878, 029-71008
www.millstreet.ie
Open: June 1-Sept 30, Mon-Sat, (Jan-May, Oct-Dec Mon-Fri, 9am-5pm by appointment only) National Heritage Week, Aug 13-21, 9am-5pm
Fee: adult €5, OAP/student free, child free when accompanied by adult

16. Drishane House, Castletownshend, Co. Cork – section 482

See my write-up:

https://irishhistorichouses.com/2021/03/07/drishane-house-castletownshend-co-cork/
Contact: Thomas Somerville
Tel: 028-36126, 083-574589
www.drishane.com
Open: May 1-31, Aug 13-21, Oct 2-21, 11am-3pm Fee: adult €10, OAP €8, student/child €6

17. Dunkathel House [or Dunkettle], Glanmire, Cork

– open to public May-Oct

18. Dún Na Séad Castle, Baltimore, Co. Cork – section 482

Donna O’Driscoll
Tel: 087-7374592
www.baltimorecastle.ie
Open: March 1-Oct 31, 11am -6pm
Fee: adult/OAP/student €5, children under 12 free

19. Fenns Quay, 4 & 5 Sheares Street, Cork – section 482

contact: Clare Supple
Tel: 089-4646208
www.encorestaging.org
Open: May 1-Nov 30, Sat-Sun, National Heritage Week Aug 13-21, 10am-2pm Fee: Adult €3, OAP €2, student €1

20. Fota House, Arboretum and Gardens

maintained by the Irish Heritage Trust, now OPW.

https://irishhistorichouses.com/2022/01/19/office-of-public-works-properties-munster/

21. Garrettstown House, Garrettstown, Kinsale, Co. Cork – section 482

contact: Denis Mawe
Tel: 021-4778156
www.garrettstownhouse.com
Open: May 15-Sept 5, 12 noon-5pm
Fee: adult €8, OAP/student/child €5, groups of 10+ adults €5 per person

22. Ilnacullin, Garanish Island, County Cork – OPW

See my OPW write-up. https://irishhistorichouses.com/2022/01/19/office-of-public-works-properties-munster/

23. Kilcascan Castle, Ballineen, Co. Cork – section 482

contact: Alison Bailey
Tel: 023- 8847200
Open: Aug 1-31, Sept 1-30, 9.30am-1.30pm
Fee: Free

24. Kilshannig House, Rathcormac, Co. Cork – section 482

https://irishhistorichouses.com/2020/12/10/kilshannig-house-rathcormac-county-cork/
contact: Hugo Merry
Tel: 025-36124
Open: May 1-31, June 1-30, July 1-31, National Heritage Week, Aug 13-21, 8.30am- 2.30pm 

Fee: adult €10, child/student €8.50, group discount by arrangements 

25. 4 Mulgrave Place, No 4, Mulgrave Road, Cork City – section 482 in 2021, not in 2022

contact: Trevor Leacy
Tel: 087-2808302
Open: May 1-Sept 30, closed Sundays except National Heritage Week August 14-22, weekdays 11am-4pm, Saturdays 11am-3pm
Fee: adult €4, OAP/student/child €2, family €7 (2+2)

26. Riverstown House, Riverstown, Glanmire, Co. Cork – section 482

contact: Denis/Rita Dooley
Tel: 021-4821205
Open: May 5-Sept 10, Thurs, Fri, Sat, National Heritage Week Aug 13-21, 2pm-6pm Fee: adult €10, OAP €7, student €5

27. Woodford Bourne Warehouse, Sheares Street, Cork – section 482

contact: Edward Nicholson
Tel: 021-4273000
www.woodfordbournewarehouse.com
Open: all year except Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, 1pm-11pm
Fee: Free

Places to stay, County Cork

1. Annes Grove (formerly Ballyhemock or Ballyhimmock), Castletownroche, Co Cork – gate lodge accommodation €€

https://www.irishlandmark.com/property/annes-grove-miniature-castle/

A miniature medieval castle, Annes Grove Gatelodge was designed in 1853 to impress visitors to the main house – Annesgrove House and Gardens.

2. Ballinacurra House, County Cork – coach house, estate cottages, and whole house rental

https://hiddenireland.com/house-pages/ballinacurrahouse/

and https://www.ballinacurra.com/the-coach-house/

  1. Estate Cottage 1 – The Coach House – up to 7 people – Self Catering – from €1,200 A 3 bedroom/4 bathroom separate 1,200 square foot home with a private outdoor dining terrace. This building has been renovated from the original coach house for the main manor house – and perfect for up to 7 people.
  2. Estate Cottage 2 – The Stone Cottage – up to 10 people – Self Catering – from €2,200 A stand-alone 1,800 square foot home with 4 bedrooms/4.5 bathrooms with its own private garden. This building was the original gardener’s cottage for the main manor house – now fully renovated that will sleep up to 10 people comfortably.
  3. Manor House (Partial) – up to 20 people – Self Catering – from €8,800 You will enjoy private use of Two Wings of the Manor House including 8 ensuite bedrooms and a range of living rooms, dining rooms, country style kitchen and outdoor dining options (can be catered or staffed by request).
  4. Manor House (Whole) – from 28 to 36 people – Full Catered & Staffed Only – on request There are 14 Bedrooms in the Manor House that can accommodate up to 36 adults + 3 children sharing and a whole range of living and entertainment spaces. Due to the numbers, this is only available on a fully catered and staffed basis.
  5. Whole Estate – from 44 to 54 people – Fully Catered & Staffed Only – on request The entire Estate consisting of the Manor House, Stone Cottage and Coach House for your private and exclusive use. A total of 22 ensuite bedrooms which is fully staffed and catered. This can cater for up to 54 adults + 4 children sharing.

3. Ballinterry House, Rathcormac, Co Cork – accommodation 

https://www.facebook.com/BallinterryH/

https://castlelyonsparish.com/who-i-am/accommodation/accommodation-2/

Ballinterry House Accommodation 
P: +353 (0)25 87835  or  +353 (0)87-6508555 
E: ballinterryhouse@yahoo.co.uk 

4. Ballylickey House, Bantry, Co Cork – now the Seaview House Hotel €€

https://www.seaviewhousehotel.com/

5. Ballymacmoy, Killavullen, Co Cork – coach house airbnb

https://www.airbnb.ie/rooms/6862913?source_impression_id=p3_1589550654_DKKIguPPQK2Nhhvp&guests=1&adults=1

https://thecoachhouseatballymacmoy.weebly.com/ballymacmoy-house.html

The website tells us: “Ballymacmoy is the estate of origin of the wild geese family, the Hennessy’s of Cognac and is still owned and inhabited by their descendants.  40 kilometres from Cork International Airport, Ballymacmoy is a 23 acre estate located at the edge of the little village of Killavullen (200 inhabitants).  It is made up of grasslands and wooded areas with 3.5 miles of exclusive fishing rights along the Blackwater river, it includes a 1 acre walled garden and a unique prehistoric private cave reserved for guests.” 

6. Ballymaloe, Cloyne, Co Cork – accommodation €€

https://www.ballymaloe.ie/

7. Ballynatray, Youghal, Co Cork, holiday cottages and whole house rental

https://hiddenireland.com/house-pages/ballynatray-coach-house-area/

a. the Coach House: The two storey Coach House takes centre stage in the stable yard and has been transformed into a beautiful, luxurious 4 bedroom self catering property. Downstairs there is a very relaxing style open plan kitchen & dining area with comfortable couches which allow for great conversations even while you prepare a bite of lunch or dinner.

b. the Garden Flat is located in the stable yard and is suitable for those looking for a self-catering holiday. There are two double bedrooms on the ground floor which would ideally suit two couples or if the need arises one of the bedrooms can be changed to be a twin room.

c. The Garden House is a quaint little cottage that sits at the bottom of the walled garden next to the beautiful Ballynatray House. Set across two floors the Garden House boasts a beautiful double room complete with comfortable armchairs either side of the open fire that fills the complete upstairs area. This is an ideal adult only location where romantic notions are never very far away.

d. Renovated & situated in the stable yard the Groom’s Flat is an ideal self catering option for two people.

8. Ballyvolane, Castlelyons, Co Cork – Hidden Ireland accommodation €€€

https://ballyvolanehouse.ie

9. Bantry House & Garden, Bantry, Co. Cork €€ 

10. Castle Martyr, Co Cork – hotel €€€

and Castle Martyr Lodges

https://www.castlemartyrresort.ie

11. Castle Townshend, Co Cork – accommodation, hotel €

http://castle-townshend.com/

12. Clifford House, Clifford, Co Cork – airbnb

https://www.airbnb.ie/rooms/23073945?source_impression_id=p3_1589821677_g%2Fl3KzQeCDhVcv1s&guests=1&adults=1

13. Creagh (former Glebe House), Skibbereen, Co Cork – B&B 

14. Creagh House, Main Street, Doneraile, Co. Cork – section 482

15. Drishane House whole house rental and holiday cottages – see above

16. Eccles Hotel, Glengarriff, Co Cork €€

Email: reservations@eccleshotel.com

Tel: +353 – 27 – 63003
www.eccleshotel.com

17. Elizabeth Fort Parade Houses, County Cork € for 3

https://www.irishlandmark.com/properties/

18. Galley Head Lighthouse Keepers House, County Cork € for 3-4

https://www.irishlandmark.com/properties/

19. Coach House Apartments, Glebe Country House, Ballinadee Bandon County Cork

https://glebecountryhouse.ie

20. Glenlohane cottage, Kanturk, Cork – accommodation €€ in house; Pink Cottage € for 3-5 for one week

www.glenlohane.ie

21. Glenville Park, Glenville, County Cork (previously known as The Manor and as Mount Pleasant) – accommodation €

http://www.glenvillepark.com 

22. Inis Beg estate, Baltimore, County Cork – €

https://www.inishbeg.com/homepage/

23. Killee Cottage, Mitchelstown, County Cork €€

https://www.irishlandmark.com/properties/

Once one of a number of bothies stretching along this quiet country lane, Killee Cottage and its neighbour are now the only two thatched cottages remaining.

24. Kilmahon House, County Cork €€ http://www.kilmahon.com/

25. Kilshannig, County Cork holiday accommodation – see above http://thecourtyardkilshannig.com/

26. Liss Ard Estate, County Cork

https://www.irelands-blue-book.ie/houses.html?country=Cork

27. Lota Lodge, Glanmire, Co Cork – now the Vienna Woods Hotel 

https://www.originalirishhotels.com/hotels/corks-vienna-woods-hotel

28. Lough Ine House and Lodge, Skibereen, County Cork – whole house or gate lodge

29. The Courtyard, Mallow

https://hiddenireland.com/house-pages/the-courtyard-mallow/

30.  Maryborough, Douglas, Co Cork – Maryborough Hotel €€

https://www.maryborough.com

31. Old Bank Townhouse, Kinsale, County Cork

https://www.oldbankhousekinsale.com

32. Perryville, Kinsale, Co Cork – hotel €€

https://www.perryvillehouse.com

[see 6]. Seaview House Hotel, Ballylicky, County Cork

33. Springfort Hall, Mallow, Co cork – hotel

Whole House Accommodation, County Cork

1. Aspen House, Dromgarriff Estate, Glengarriff, Cork, Ireland – whole house rental  

https://cashelfean.ie/aspen-house/  

2. Ballinacurra House, County Cork – coach house, estate cottages, and whole house rental

3. Ballynatray, Youghal, Co Cork, holiday cottages and whole house rental

4. Barnabrow, Cloyne, Co Cork – accommodation

https://www.barnabrowhouse.ie/

Cloyne, Midleton, East Cork, Ireland. 
info@barnabrowhouse.ie 
+353 21 4652534

5. Blackwater Castle (Castle Widenham, or Blackwater Valley Castle) Castletownroache, Co Cork www.blackwatercastle.com

6. Blairscove House, County Cork www.blairscove.ie

7. Careysville (Ballymacpatrick Castle), Clondulane, Fermoy, Co.Cork, Ireland P61 VF53 – accommodation

https://careysville.com 

Careysville House sits on an escarpment overlooking the fishery, with stunning views of the Blackwater valley. Guests can look out of their bedroom window and see one of the most stunning stretches of salmon fishing in Ireland, not to mention watch the salmon jumping in the pools below. It was built in 1812 in the Georgian style, on the site of the old ruined Ballymacpatrick Castle.

8. Drishane House whole house rental and holiday cottages – see above

www.drishane.com

9. Dunowen House, Co Cork – Blue Book Accommodation www.dunowenhouse.ie

10. Farran House, County Cork, whole house rental € for 5-8 for one week www.farranhouse.com

https://hiddenireland.com/house-pages/farran-house/

An elegant Italiante style Manor house in mature beech woodland and gardens close to Cork City (15km).

11. Longueville, Mallow, Co Cork – Blue Book accommodation €€€

https://www.longuevillehouse.ie/

12. Lough Ine House and Lodge, Skibberreen, County Cork – whole house €€€ for two, € for 5-8; or gate lodge €

http://www.loughinehouse.com

This beautiful holiday house and cottage are set on stunning Lough Ine sometimes spelt Lough Hyne – which is well known as one of the most romantic spots in West Cork.

14. Rincolisky Castle, Whitehall, co Cork – renovated, whole house. €€€ for 2, € for 5.

  https://www.airbnb.ie/rooms/20771431?source_impression_id=p3_1646737924_o%2BwxYCDhpDgJDHfX

15. Southernmost House, Cape Clear Island, County Cork

https://hiddenireland.com/stay/self-catering-holiday-rentals/

Derry:

1. Bellaghy Bawn, County Derry

https://discovernorthernireland.com/things-to-do/bellaghy-bawn-p675661

Built around 1619 by Sir Baptist Jones, Bellaghy Bawn is a fortified house and bawn (the defensive wall surrounding an Irish tower house). What exists today is a mix of various building styles from different periods with the main house lived in until 1987.

2. Hezlett House, 107 Sea Road, Castlerock, County Derry, BT51 4TW on Downhill Demesne. https://discovernorthernireland.com/things-to-do/hezlett-house-p687301

3. Mussenden Temple, Downhill Demesne

https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/mussenden-temple-and-downhill-demesne

4. Springhill House, County Derry

https://discovernorthernireland.com/things-to-do/springhill-p675711

Springhill has a beguiling spirit that captures the heart of every visitor.  Described as ‘one of the prettiest houses in Ulster’, its welcoming charm reveals a family home with portraits, furniture and decorative arts that bring to life the many generations of Lenox-Conynghams who lived here from 1680. The old laundry houses one of Springhill’s most popular attractions, the Costume Collection with some exceptionally fine 18th to 20th century pieces.

See also https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/springhill

Places to stay, County Derry

1. Ardtara Country House and restaurant, County Derry €€

 WWW.ARDTARA.COM

2. Brown Trout Inn, Aghadowey, Nr Coleraine Co. Derry, BT51 4AD

https://www.originalirishhotels.com/hotels/brown-trout-golf-country-inn

3. Roselick Lodge, County Derry – for 8 people

https://www.roselicklodge.co.uk

Dating back to 1830, this sympathetically restored Georgian property offers a tranquil rural setting midway between Portstewart and Portrush. Whilst retaining many of the original features and charm, the open plan extension has been adapted to suit modern living. The accommodation comprises three main reception areas, a Magnificent Family Kitchen /Living and Dining area, a cosy and tastefully decorated Snug with open fire, access to south facing Orangery and large secluded cottage gardens. Upstairs are four well proportioned bedrooms sleeping up to eight guests and a spacious first floor balcony with sea views. Minimum 3 night stay.

Whole House Rental, County Derry

1. Beechill House, 32 Ardmore Road, Derry-Londonderry, Northern Ireland BT47 3QP – weddings

https://www.beech-hill.com/

Beechill Country House Hotel, Courtesy of Tyrone and Sperrins destination, for Tourism Ireland.

2. Drenagh House, County Derry – whole house rental, 22 people

https://www.drenagh.com

Donegal:

1. Cavanacor House, Ballindrait, Lifford, Co. Donegal – section 482

contact: Joanna O’Kane
Tel: 074-9141143, 085-8165428
www.cavanacorgallery.ie
Open: Feb 1-20, May 1-31, Aug 14-22, 1pm-5pm 

Fee: adult €8, OAP/student/child €6 

2. Doe Castle, County Donegal – OPW

see OPW entry https://irishhistorichouses.com/2022/01/18/office-of-public-works-properties-ulster/

3. Donegal Castle, County Donegal – OPW

see OPW entry https://irishhistorichouses.com/2022/01/18/office-of-public-works-properties-ulster/

4. Glebe Art Museum, County Donegal – OPW

see OPW entry https://irishhistorichouses.com/2022/01/18/office-of-public-works-properties-ulster/

5. Glenveagh Castle, County Donegal

Glenveagh, photograph by Gareth Wray, 2020 for Tourism Ireland (see [1])

6. Oakfield Park Garden, Oakfield Demesne, Raphoe, Co. Donegal – section 482, garden only

contact: Louise Devenney
Tel: 074-9173922
www.oakfieldpark.com
Open: Mar 30-31, Apr 1-3, 6-10, 13-18, 20-24, 27-30, May 1-2, 4-8, 11-15, 18-22, 25-29, June 1-30, July 1-31, Aug 1-31, Sept 1-4, 7-11, 14-18, 21-25, Oct 1-2, 8-9, Nov 30, Dec 1-4, 7-11, 14-23, Mar, Apr, May, Sept, Oct, 12 noon-6pm, June, July, Aug, 11am-6pm, Nov, 4pm-10pm, Dec 1-18, weekdays, 4pm-10pm, weekends, 12 noon-10pm, 19-20, 4pm-10pm, 21-23, 12 noon-10pm

Fee: adult €9, child €6, family and season passes

7. Salthill Garden, Salthill House, Mountcharles, Co. Donegal – section 482, garden only

See my write-up:

https://irishhistorichouses.com/2021/10/06/salthill-garden-salthill-house-mountcharles-county-donegal/
contact: Elizabeth Temple
Tel:  087-7988078, 074-9735014
www.donegalgardens.com
Open: May 5-7, 12-14, 19-21, 26-28, June 2-4, 9-11, 16-18, 23-25, July 1-2, 4-9, 11- 16, 18-23, 25-30, Aug 1-6, 8-27, 29-31, Sept 1-2, 5-9, 12-16, 19-23, 26-30, 2pm-6pm Fee: adult/OAP €6, student €5, child €3

Places to Stay, County Donegal

1. Bruckless House Gate Lodge, Bruckless, County Donegal

https://hiddenireland.com/stay/self-catering-holiday-rentals/

2. Castle Grove, County Donegal – hotel €€

https://www.irelands-blue-book.ie/houses.html?country=Donegal 

3. Cavangarden, Ballyshannon, Co Donegal – B&B http://www.cavangardenhouse.com

4. Dunmore, Carrigans, Co Donegal – accommodation for weddings, conferences 

https://www.dunmoregardens.ie/our-history/

5. Frewin, Ramelton, Co Donegal – accommodation

https://hiddenireland.com/house-pages/frewin/ 

6. Lough Eske Castle, near Donegal, Co Donegal – hotel  €€€

www.lougheskecastlehotel.com

7. Rathmullan House, Co Donegal – hotel €€

https://www.irelands-blue-book.ie/houses.html?country=Donegal

8. Railway Crossing Cottage near Donegal town €€

https://www.irishlandmark.com/properties/

9. Rock Hill, Letterkenny, Co Donegal – hotel 

https://www.rockhillhouse.ie

10. Sandhouse Hotel, Rossknowlagh, Co Donegal €€

https://www.originalirishhotels.com/hotels/sandhouse-hotel

11. St. Columb’s, St Mary’s Road, Buncrana, Co Donegal, Ireland ~ Tel: 087 4526696 ~ Email: info@stcolumbshouse.com https://stcolumbshouse.com

12. St John’s Point Lighthouse cottage, Dunkineely, County Donegal € for 3-4

https://www.irishlandmark.com/properties/

13. Termon House, Dungloe, County Donegal, whole house rental: € for 3-6

https://www.irishlandmark.com/propertytag/cottages-and-houses/?gclid=Cj0KCQiApL2QBhC8ARIsAGMm-KFInICcRSxwLSiDxfFNk5WFytNcVrLvOQYhzJbIBes4V-M65iXz0gYaAln_EALw_wcB

Termon House, a former 18th century land agent’s house in Maghery, near Dungloe, is located in the heart of the Gaeltacht area.

14. Woodhill House, Ardara, County Donegal

https://www.woodhillhouse.com

Whole House Rental County Donegal:

1. Drumhalla House, Rathmullen, County Donegal – whole house rental and wedding venue https://drumhallahouse.ie

Down:

1. Audley’s Castle, County Down

https://discovernorthernireland.com/things-to-do/audleys-castle-p707501

2. Bangor Castle Park, County Down

https://discovernorthernireland.com/things-to-do/bangor-castle-town-hall-p676451

3. Castle Ward, County Down

https://discovernorthernireland.com/things-to-do/castle-ward-p675331

4. Dundrum Castle, County Down https://discovernorthernireland.com/things-to-do

5. Hillsborough Castle, County Down

https://www.hrp.org.uk/hillsborough-castle

6. Montalto Estate, County Down

https://discovernorthernireland.com/things-to-do/montalto-estate-p728301

7. Mount Stewart, County Down

https://discovernorthernireland.com/things-to-do/mount-stewart-p675341

8. Newry and Mourne Museum, Bagenal’s Castle, County Down

https://discovernorthernireland.com/things-to-do/newry-and-mourne-museum-bagenals-castle-p690251

9. Portaferry Castle, County Down

https://discovernorthernireland.com/things-to-do/portaferry-castle-p676311

Places to stay, County Down

1. Barr Hall Barns, Portaferry, County Downwww.barrhallbarns.co.uk

2. Castle Ward, Potter’s Cottage in farmyard:

https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/holidays/the-potters-cottage-northern-ireland

and Castle Ward bunkhouse: https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/holidays/castle-ward-bunkhouse-northern-ireland

Sleeps 14 people.

3. Culloden, County Down – hotel €€€

4. Florida Manor, 22 Florida Road, Killinchy, Newtownards, Co Down, BT23 6RT Northern Ireland http://www.floridamanorni.com/cgi-bin/greeting?instanceID=1

5. Helen’s Tower, Bangor, County Down €€

https://www.irishlandmark.com/property/helens-tower/

6. Kiltariff Hall, County Down

https://www.kiltariffhall.co.uk 

7. Narrow Water Castle, apartment, Newry Road, Warrenpoint, Down, Northern Ireland, BT34 3LE http://narrowwatercastle.co.uk

8. Slieve Donard hotel and spa, County Down

https://www.slievedonardhotel.com

9. St John’s Point Lighthouse Sloop, Killough, County Down € for 3-4

https://www.irishlandmark.com/properties/

10. Tullymurry House, Tullymurry road, Donaghmore, Newry, County Down – sleeps 8, € for 8

https://www.irishlandmark.com/property/tullymurry-house/

11. Tyrella, Downpatrick, County Down, BT30 8SU – accommodation

https://www.tyrellahouse.com/the-rooms

Whole house County Down

1. Ballydugan House, County Down

http://ballyduganhouse.com/

Dublin:

1. Airfield, Dundrum, Dublin

 https://www.airfield.ie

2. Aras an Uachtarain, Phoenix Park, Dublin – OPW

see my OPW entry https://irishhistorichouses.com/2022/01/21/office-of-public-works-properties-dublin/

3. Ardan, Windgate Road, Howth – gardens by appt https://www.dublingardengroup.com/ardan/

4. Ardgillan Castle, Dublin

5. Ashtown Castle, Phoenix Park, Dublin – OPW

see my OPW entry https://irishhistorichouses.com/2022/01/21/office-of-public-works-properties-dublin/

6. Bewley’s, 78-79 Grafton Street/234 Johnson’s Court, Dublin 2 – section 482

Contact: Peter O’ Callaghan
Tel 087-7179367
www.bewleys.com
Open: all year except Christmas Day, 9am-5pm Fee: Free

7. Cabinteely House [formerly Clare Hill, or Marlfield], Cabinteely, Dublin

 https://www.dlrcoco.ie/en/heritage/heritage

There’s a terrific online tour, at https://www.dlrcoco.ie/en/heritage/3d-online-tours-–-heritage-home

8. The Casino at Marino, Dublin – OPW

see my OPW entry https://irishhistorichouses.com/2022/01/21/office-of-public-works-properties-dublin/

9. Charlemount House, Parnell Square, Dublin – Hugh Lane gallery

 https://www.hughlane.ie

10. Clonskeagh Castle, 80 Whitebean Road, Clonskeagh, Dublin 14 – section 482

contact: Frank Armstrong
Tel: 089-4091645, 087-9787357 

www.clonskeaghcastle.com

Open: Jan 6-9, Feb 6-9, Mar 6-9, Apr 6-9, May 1-8, June 1-8, July 1-8, August 13-22, Sept 1-8, Nov 6-9, 2pm-6pm
Fee: adult/OAP €5, child/student €2.50

11. Colganstown House, Hazelhatch Road, Newcastle, Co. Dublin – section 482

see my write-up:

https://irishhistorichouses.com/2020/05/21/colganstown-house-hazelhatch-road-newcastle-county-dublin/
contact: Lynne Savage Jones
Tel: 087-2206222
Open: Apr 11-17, May 5-27, June 9-11, Aug 13-26, Oct 31, Nov 1-12, 9am-1pm Fee: adult/OAP €10, student/child free.

12. Corke Lodge Garden, Shankill, Co. Dublin – section 482

Postal address Woodbrook, Bray, Co. Wicklow
contact: Alfred Cochrane
Tel: 087-2447006
www.corkelodge.com
Open: June 21-Sept 8, Tue-Sat, National Heritage Week Aug 13-21, 9am-1pm Fee: €8

13. Dalkey Castle, Dublin – heritage centre 

https://www.dalkeycastle.com

Believe it or not, I did my Leaving Certificate examinations in this building!! I was extremely lucky and I loved it and the great atmosphere helped me to get the points/grades I wanted!

14. Doheny & Nesbitt, 4/5 Lower Baggot Street, Dublin 2 – section 482

contact: Niall Courtney
Tel: 086-0647083, 01-4925395 

www.dohenyandnesbitts.ie

Open: all year, except Christmas Day, Jan, 9am-8pm, Feb-Dec, Mon-Wed, 10am- 11.30pm, Thurs-Sat, 10am-1.30am, Sun, 11am-11.30pm
Fee: Free

15. Drimnagh Castle, Dublin

 https://www.drimnaghcastle.org

16. Dublin Castle, Dublin – OPW

see my OPW entry https://irishhistorichouses.com/2022/01/21/office-of-public-works-properties-dublin/

17. Fahanmura, 2 Knocksina, Foxrock, Dublin 18 – section 482

contact: Paul Harvey
Tel: Paul 086-3694379
www.fahanmura.ie
Open: May 5-15, June 13-19, July 4-12, Aug 13-25, Sept 10-24, Oct 10-14, 9am-1pm Fee: adult €5, student €2, OAP/child free

18. Farm Complex, Toberburr Road, Killeek, St Margaret’s, Co. Dublin – section 482

contact: David Doran
Tel: 086-3821304
OpenJan 1-10, 15-16, 22-23, 29-30, 12 noon 4pm, May 1-8, 14-15, June 4-13, Mon- Fri, 10am-2pm, Sat-Sun, 2pm-6pm, Aug 12-21, 2pm-6pm, Sept 16-25, Mon- Fri, 9.30-1.30pm, Sat-Sun, 2pm-6pm, Oct 22, 29-31, 12 noon-4pm

Fee: adult €6, student/OAP/child €5

19. Farmleigh, Phoenix Park, Dublin – OPW

see my OPW entry. https://irishhistorichouses.com/2022/01/21/office-of-public-works-properties-dublin/

20. Fern Hill, Stepaside, Dublin – gardens open to public

 https://www.dlrcoco.ie/en/parks-outdoors/fernhill-park-and-gardens

21. Georgian House Museum, 29 Lower Fitzwilliam Street, Merrion Square, Dublin 2 – virtual visit only

http://www.numbertwentynine.ie

22. “Geragh”, Sandycove Point, Sandycove, Co. Dublin – section 482

contact: Gráinne Casey
Tel: 01-2804884
Open: Jan 4-23, May 3-29, Aug 13-21, Sept 1, 12-14, 2pm-6pm Fee: adult €7, OAP/student €4, child free

23. 14 Henrietta Street, Dublin – tenement museum https://14henriettastreet.ie

24. Hibernian/National Irish Bank, 23-27 College Green, Dublin 2 – section 482

contact: Dan O’Sullivan
Tel: 01-6755100
www.clarendonproperties.ie
Open: all year, except Dec 25, Wed-Fri, 9.30am-8pm, Sun, 11am-7pm, Sat, Mon, Tue, 9.30-7pm

Fee: Free

25. Howth Castle gardens, Howth, County Dublin

26. Knocknagin House, Delvin Bridge, Balbriggan, Co. Dublin – section 482

contact: Richard Berney
Tel: 087-2847797
Open: June 23-30, July 1-31, Aug 1-21, 9am-1pm Fee: adult/OAP/child/student €5

27. Knockrose Garden, The Scalp, Kiltiernan – garden open 

28. Lambay Castle, Lambay Island, Malahide, Co. Dublin – section 482

contact: Alexander Baring
Tel: 087-1905236 

www.lambayisland.ie
(Tourist Accommodation Facility) Open: May-October

29. Lissen Hall, County Dublin – ihh member, check dates, May and June.

30. Malahide Castle, County Dublin

maintained by Shannon Heritage.

31. Marlay Park, Rathfarnham, County Dublin

https://www.dlrcoco.ie/en/heritage/heritage

and online tour https://www.dlrcoco.ie/en/heritage/3d-online-tours-–-heritage-home

32. Martello Tower, Portrane, Co. Dublin – section 482

contact: Terry Prone
Tel: 01-6449700
Open: March 6-Sept 26, Sat & Sun and National Heritage Week, Aug 13-21, 9am-1pm
Fee: adult €5, student €4, OAP €1

33. Meander, Westminister Road, Foxrock, Dublin 18 – section 482

contact: Ruth O’Herlihy,
Tel: 087-2163623
Open: Jan 3-7, 10-14, 17-21, 24-28, May 3-7, 12-14, 16-21, June 7-11, 13-18, 20-25, Aug 13-21, 9am-1pm

Fee: adult €5, OAP/child/student €2

34. Irish Architectural Archive, 45 Merrion Square, Dublin

 www.iarc.ie

35. MOLI, Museum of Literature Ireland, Newman House, St Stephen’s Green, Dublin

https://moli.ie

Rococo stucco work in Museum of Literature of Ireland (MOLI), Newman House, Stephen’s Green, Dublin.

36. Mornington Garden, Dalkey – gardens open https://dalkeygardenschool.com/home/mornington-garden/dgs-garden-opening-dates-times/

37. Newbridge House, Donabate, County Dublin

which is maintained by Shannon Heritage

https://www.newbridgehouseandfarm.com

38. 11 North Great George’s Street, Dublin 1 – section 482

see my write-up:

https://irishhistorichouses.com/2019/12/31/11-north-great-georges-street-dublin-1/
contact: John Aboud
Tel: 087-7983099
www.number11dublin.ie
Open: March 7-11, 21-25, May 10-14, June 6-11, July 4-9, Aug 1-6, 13-22, Sept 5-11, Oct 3-7, 17-21, 12 noon-4 pm
Fee: adult €7, students/OAP €3, child free under 12 years

39. 81 North King Street, Smithfield, Dublin 7 – section 482

contact: James Kelly
Tel: 086-8597275
Open: Apr 1-30, June 1-30, July 1-30, National Heritage Week 13-21 Aug, closed Sundays except Aug 14 & 21, Mon-Fri, 9am-4.30, Sat, 12.30pm-4.30pm

Fee: Free 

40. The Odeon (formerly the Old Harcourt Street Railway Station), 57 Harcourt Street, Dublin 2 – section 482

contact: Mary Lacey
Tel: 01-6727690
www.odeon.ie
Open: March-December, 12 noon to midnight Fee: Free

41. The Old Glebe, Upper Main Street, Newcastle, Co. Dublin – section 482

See my write-up:

https://irishhistorichouses.com/2019/12/31/the-old-glebe-newcastle-lyons-county-dublin/
contact: Hugh F. Kerins, Martin Connelly
Tel: Frank 087-2588356, and Martin 087-6686996
Open: May 3-31, June 1-30, Mon-Sat, Aug 13-22, 10am-2pm, 4 tours daily during National Heritage Week, 10am, 11am, 12 noon, 1pm, tour approx. 45 minutes
Fee: adult €5, student €3, child/OAP free, no charge during National Heritage Week

42. Powerscourt Townhouse Centre, 59 South William Street, Dublin 2 – section 482

see my write-up:

https://irishhistorichouses.com/2020/04/02/powerscourt-townhouse-59-south-william-street-dublin-2/
contact: Mary Larkin
Tel: 01-6717000, 01-6755100
https://www.powerscourtcentre.ie/
Open: All year except New Year’s Day, Easter Sunday, Easter Monday, Christmas Day, St. Stephen’s Day & Bank Holidays, Mon-Sat, 10am-6pm, Thurs, 10am-8pm, Sundays, 12 noon-6pm
Fee: Free

43. Primrose Hill, Very Top of Primrose Lane, Lucan, Co. Dublin – section 482

contact: Robin Hall
Tel: 01-6280373
Open: Feb 1-28, June 1-30, July 1, Aug 13-21, 2pm-6pm Fee: adult/OAP €6, child free

44. Rathfarnham Castle, Dublin – OPW

see my OPW entry. https://irishhistorichouses.com/2022/01/21/office-of-public-works-properties-dublin/

45. Royal Hospital Kilmainham (Irish Museum of Modern Art, IMMA)

46. 10 South Frederick Street, Dublin 2 – Section 482

contact: Joe Hogan
Tel: 087-2430334
Open: Jan 1-20, May 1-21, 23-27, 30-31, June 1-3, Aug 13-21, 2pm-6pm Fee: Free

47. St. Enda’s Park and Pearse Museum, Dublin – OPW

see my OPW entry https://irishhistorichouses.com/2022/01/21/office-of-public-works-properties-dublin/

48. St. George’s, St. George’s Avenue, Killiney, Co. Dublin – section 482

contact: Robert McQuillan
Tel: 087-2567718
Open: July 1-31, Aug 1-31, 9am-1pm
Fee: adult €5, OAP/student/child €3.50

49. Swords Castle, Swords, County Dublin.

50. The Church, Junction of Mary’s Street/Jervis Street, Dublin 1 – section 482

contact: Ann French
Tel: 087-2245726
www.thechurch.ie
Open: Jan 1-Dec 23, 27-31, 12 noon-11pm Fee: Free

51. Tibradden House, Mutton Lane, Rathfarnham, Dublin 16 – section 482

contact: Selina Guinness
Tel: 01-4957483
www.selinaguinness.com
Open: Jan 6-10, 14, 17, 21, 24, 28, Feb 4, 7, 11, 14, 28, Mar 7, 11, 14, 25, 28, May 3-6, 10-13, 17-22, 24-29, June 8-11, 13, 17-19, 21-23, Aug 13-21, Jan, May, June, 10am-2pm, Feb, Mar, 2.30pm-6.30pm, National Heritage Week, 2pm-6pm
Fee: adult/OAP €8 student/child free, Members of An Taisce and The Irish Georgian Society €6

52. Tickknock Gardens, Ticknock Lodge, Ticknock Road, Sandyford, Dublin, Dublin 18, IE 

www.ticknockgardens.ie 

53. Tyrrelstown House Garden, Powerstown Road, Tyrrelstown, Dublin, D15 T6DD, IE 

www.tyrrelstownhouse.ie 

Open days 3rd Friday & Sat of months Feb – October 

54. Transport Museum in Howth Martello Tower or at Howth Castle and Hurdy Gurdy Radio Museum https://sites.google.com/site/hurdygurdymuseum/home 

Places to stay, County Dubin:

1. Clontarf Castle, Clontarf, Co Dublin – hotel www.clontarfcastle.ie

2. Finnstown, Lucan, Co Dublin – hotel https://www.finnstowncastlehotel.com/weddings.html

3. Harrington Hall, 70 Harcourt St, Saint Peter’s, Dublin 2, D02 HP46

https://www.harringtonhall.com  

4. Killiney Castle, Killiney, Co Dublin  – Fitzpatrick’s hotel www.fitzpatrickcastle.com

5. Kilronan Guesthouse, 70 Adelaide Road, Dublin 2

https://www.kilronanhouse.com

6. Lambay Castle, Lambay Island, Malahide, Dublin  – section 482

Alexander Baring
Tel: 087-1905236 

www.lambayisland.ie
(Tourist Accommodation Facility) Open: May-October

7. The Merchant House, Temple Bar https://www.themerchanthouse.eu

8. Merrion Mews, Merrion Square, Dublin € for 4-6

https://www.irishlandmark.com/property/merrion-mews/

9. Mooreen House, Newlands Cross, Dublin. (built 1936) 

http://www.mooreen.ie npnewlands@gmail.com 

10. Mornington House, Merrion Street, Dublin – Merrion Hotel 

11. Number 31, Leeson Close, Dublin 2, D02 CP70

https://www.number31.ie

12. Number 11 North Great Georges Street,

https://number11dublin.ie/airbnb/

13. St. Helen’s, Booterstown, Co Dublin – now Radisson Blu Stillorgan hotel 

14. The Cottage, Kiltiernan, Dublin €

https://thecottagedublin.com/

The Cottage has a great history and has stood here for over 200 years looking down over the City boundaries, Dublin Bay and beyond.

This unique Irish Cottage has been tastefully restored to the highest modern standards so as to provide four star comforts within its two foot thick walls.
The Cottage is a great place from which to explore.

15. Tibradden Farm Cottages, Rathfarmham, Dublin 16 € for 4-8

https://www.dublincottages.com/

16. Waterloo House, Waterloo Road, Dublin 4 €€

https://www.waterloohouse.ie

Waterloo House is situated in Ballsbridge Dublin 4, just off the bustling Baggot Street and only a few minutes walk from St. Stephen’s Green, Grafton Street and many of Dublin’s key places of interest.

17. The Wilder Townhouse, Dublin 2

https://www.thewilder.ie/en/

Whole House Rental, Dublin:

1. Dalkey Lodge, Barnhill Road, Dalkey, County Dublin – whole house rental http://www.dalkeylodge.com/Contact.htm

2. Dartry House, Orwell Woods, Dartry, Rathgar, Dublin 6 – whole house rental https://www.airbnb.ie/rooms/46375076?federated_search_id=cb6603db-efd7-498c-8b21-dadc954e11ce&source_impression_id=p3_1646747923_dTbQ0T%2FnCNjzHKYX

3. Luttrellstown Castle, (known for a period as Woodlands), Clonsilla, Co Dublin – whole house? wedding venue https://www.originalirishhotels.com/hotels/luttrellstown-castle-resort

4. Martello Tower, Sutton, Dublin https://martellotowersutton.com

5. Orlagh House, Dublin www.orlaghestate.ie

Fermanagh:

1. Castle Archdale Countryside Centre & War Museum, County Fermanagh

https://discovernorthernireland.com/things-to-do/castle-archdale-countryside-centre-and-war-museum-p675541

2. Castle Balfour (ruin), County Fermanagh

https://discovernorthernireland.com/things-to-do/castle-balfour-p675501

3. Castle Coole, County Fermanagh

https://discovernorthernireland.com/things-to-do/castle-coole-p676121 https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/castle-coole

4. Crom Estate, County Fermanagh

https://discovernorthernireland.com/things-to-do/crom-estate-p675551 https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/crom

5. Enniskillen Castle, County Fermanagh

https://discovernorthernireland.com/things-to-do/enniskillen-castle-p742361

6. Florence Court, County Fermanagh

https://discovernorthernireland.com/things-to-do/florence-court-p675531

Places to stay, County Fermanagh

1. Ashbrooke House, Brookeborough, Enniskillen Co Fermanagh BT94 4GX – whole house rental https://www.ashbrookehouse.com

Ashbrooke House is the dower house to Colebrook Park – see below.

2. Belle Isle Courtyard cottages, Lisbellaw, Enniskillen, County Fermanagh Northern Ireland

Belle Isle Estate, photo by Brian Morrison 2008 for Tourism Ireland. (see [1])

https://belle-isle.com

3. Colebrooke gate lodge, Colebrooke Park, County Fermanagh

https://www.irishlandmark.com/propertytag/cottages-and-houses/?gclid=Cj0KCQiApL2QBhC8ARIsAGMm-KFInICcRSxwLSiDxfFNk5WFytNcVrLvOQYhzJbIBes4V-M65iXz0gYaAln_EALw_wcB

see also https://colebrooke.info

and Triumphal Arch Lodge, Colebrook, County Fermanagh € for 4

https://www.irishlandmark.com/property/triumphal-arch-lodge/ and

https://colebrooke.info/cottages/triumphal-arch-lodge/

4. West Wing, Crom Castle, County Fermanagh

Crom Castle, Fermanagh Courtesy of Tourism Northern Ireland, by Brian Morrison, 2008

https://cromcastle.com

Holiday cottages at Crom:

https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/crom/features/holiday-cottages-at-crom

Adler’s cottage € and Bluebell Cottage € and Aspen Cottage €

5. Erne View Cottage, Enniskillen, County Fermanagh €

https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/holidays/erne-view-northern-ireland

6. Florence Court, County Fermanagh – Butler’s Apartment

https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/holidays/butlers-apartment-northern-ireland

7. Killadeas Manor, County Fermanagh – Manor House Hotel 

https://www.manorhousecountryhotel.com

Galway:

1. Athenry Castle, County Galway (OPW)

see my OPW entry: https://irishhistorichouses.com/2022/02/14/office-of-public-works-properties-connacht/

2. Ardamullivan Castle, Galway – national monument, to be open to public in future – check status 

3. Ardcarrig Garden, Oranswell, Bushypark, Galway, IE 

https://www.gardensofireland.org/directory/22/ardcarrig/

4. Athenry Castle, County Galway  – open to public 

5. Aughnanure Castle, County Galway (OPW)

see my OPW entry: https://irishhistorichouses.com/2022/02/14/office-of-public-works-properties-connacht/

6. Ballinderry House, Ballinderry Park, Kilconnell, Ballinasloe, Galway, H53XP26 – open to public, and accommodation 

www.ballinderrypark.com

7. Ballynahinch Castle hotel and gardens,

https://www.discoverireland.ie/galway/ballynahinch-castle-hotel-and-gardens

8. Castle Ellen House, Athenry, Co. Galway – section 482

contact: Míceál P. O’Cionnaith and Diarmuid
Tel: 087-2747692, 087-8137058
http://www.castleellen.ie/
Open: June 5-9, 12-16, 19-23, 26-30, July 3-7, 10-14, 17-21, 24-28, 31, Aug 7-11, 13- 25, 28-31, National Heritage Week, Aug 13-21, 12 noon-4pm
Fee: Free

9. Claregalway Castle, Claregalway, Co. Galway – section 482

contact: Eamonn O’ Donoghue
Tel: 091-799666
www.claregalwaycastle.com
Open: June-Sept, Sunday-Wednesday, National Heritage Week, Aug 13-21, 12 noon- 4pm

Fee: adult €6, student/OAP/child €4

10. Coole Park, County Galway – house gone but stables visitor site open

11. Gleane Aoibheann, Clifden, Galway, IE  – gardens

https://www.gardensofireland.org/directory/23/gleann+aoibheann/

12. Kylemore Abbey, County Galway

13. Lisdonagh House, Caherlistrane, Co. Galway – section 482

contact: John & Finola Cooke
Tel: 093-31163, John, 086-0529052, Finola, 086-0546565
www.lisdonagh.com
(Tourist Accommodation Facility)
Open: May 1-Nov 1
Fee: Free

14. The Grammer School, College Road, Galway – section 482

contact: Terry Fahy
www.yeatscollege.ie
Tel: 091-533500
Open: May 7-8, 14-15, 21-22, 28-29, June 11-12, July 1-31, Aug 1-21, 9am-5pm Fee: adult/OAP/student €5, child under 12 free

15. Oranmore Castle, Oranmore, Co. Galway – section 482

Leonie Phinn
http://www.oranmorecastle.com/
Tel: 086-6003160
Open: April 14-30, May 10-20, June 10-20, Aug 10-24, Sept 1-6, 11am-3pm Fee: adult €8, child €3

16. Portumna Castle, County Galway (OPW)

see my OPW entry: https://irishhistorichouses.com/2022/02/14/office-of-public-works-properties-connacht/

17. Ross, Moycullen, Co Galway – gardens open 

www.rosscastle.com 

18. Signal Tower & Lighthouse, Eochaill, Inis Mór, Aran Islands, Co. Galway – section 482

contact: Michael Mullen
Tel: 087-2470900
www.aranislands.ie
Open: June-Sept, 9am-5pm.
Fee: adult €2.50, child €1.50, family €5, group rates depending on numbers

19. Thoor Ballylee, County Galway

20. Woodville House Dovecote & Walls of Walled Garden – section 482, garden only
Craughwell, Co. Galway

Margarita and Michael Donoghue
Tel: 087-9069191
www.woodvillewalledgarden.com
Open: Jan 28-31, Feb 4-7, 11-14, 18-21, 25-28, June 1-30, Aug 13-22, 12 noon-4pm Fee: adult €10, OAP €8, student, €6, child €3 must be accompanied by adult, family €20-2 adults and 2 children

Places to stay, County Galway

1. Abbeyglen Castle, Galway €€ 

www.abbeyglen.ie

2. Ashford Castle, Cong, Galway/Mayo  – hotel €€€

3. Ballynahinch Castle, Connemara, Co. Galway – hotel €€€

https://www.ballynahinch-castle.com

4. Cashel House, Cashel, Connemara, Co Galway – hotel €€

https://cashelhouse.ie/cms/

5. Castle Hacket, Belclare, County Galway H54 E977

https://castlehacket-house.com/

6. Claregalway Castle, Claregalway, Co. Galway – section 482 €€

https://www.airbnb.ie/users/85042652/listings

7. Cregg Castle, Corrandulla, Co Galway – Airbnb

https://www.airbnb.ie/rooms/7479769?adults=1&guests=1&federated_search_id=183d53cc-d5ff-4694-b6e9-c9364ec13218&source_impression_id=p3_1646847320_U8Q%2BQhs8xA6BUsHo

8. Crocnaraw Country House, Moyard, Clifden, County Galway

http://www.crocnaraw.ie 

9. Currarevagh, Oughterard, Co Galway – country house hotel €€

https://www.currarevagh.com

10. Delphi Lodge, Leenane, Co Galway €€€

https://delphilodge.ie

and Boathouse Cottages €€ https://hiddenireland.com/stay/self-catering-holiday-rentals/

and Wren’s Cottage €€

11. Emlaghmore Cottage, Connemara, County Galway

https://hiddenireland.com/stay/self-catering-holiday-rentals/

12. Glenarde, Co Galway – hotel (Ardilaun House Hotel) €

https://www.theardilaunhotel.ie

13. Glenlo Abbey, near Galway, Co Galway – accommodation €€

https://www.glenloabbeyhotel.ie

14. Kilcolgan Castle, Clarinbridge, Co Galway €€€

https://www.airbnb.ie/rooms/3828868?source_impression_id=p3_1646846790_ewMVmVyqLYmix%2FSv

15. Lisdonagh House, Caherlistrane, Co. Galway – section 482, see above

contact: John & Finola Cooke
Tel: 093-31163, John, 086-0529052, Finola, 086-0546565
www.lisdonagh.com
(Tourist Accommodation Facility)
Open: May 1-Nov 1

16. Lough Cutra Castle, County Galway, holiday cottages

https://www.loughcutra.com

and Cormorant Cottage https://www.loughcutra.com/cormorant.html

17. Lough Inagh Lodge Hotel, County Galway https://www.loughinaghlodgehotel.ie/en/

18. The Quay House, Clifden, Co Galway €€ 

https://thequayhouse.com  

19. Renvyle, Letterfrack, Co Galway – hotel

https://www.renvyle.com

20. Rosleague Manor, Galway – accommodation

https://www.rosleague.com

21. Ross, Moycullen, Co Galway 

www.rosscastle.com 

22. Ross Lake House Hotel, Oughterard, County Galway

http://rosslakehotel.com/

23. Screebe House, Camus Bay, County Galway €€€

https://www.screebe.com/

24. Thorn Park, Oranmore, Co Galway – now the Oranmore Lodge Hotel  https://www.oranmorelodge.ie

Whole House Accommodation and Weddings, County Galway:

1. Cloghan Castle, near Loughrea, County Galway – whole castle accommodation and weddings, €€€ for two.

Kerry:

1. Ballyseede Castle, Tralee, Co. Kerry – section 482

contact: Marnie Corscadden
Tel: 066-7125799
www.ballyseedecastle.com
Open: Feb 25-Dec 21, 8am-8pm, Dec 27-31,10am-4pm Fee: Free

2. Derrynane House, Caherdaniel, Kerry – OPW

see my OPW entry: https://irishhistorichouses.com/2022/02/14/office-of-public-works-properties-connacht/

3. Derreen Gardens, Lauragh, Tuosist, Kenmare, Co. Kerry – section 482

John Daly
Tel: 087-1325665
https://www.derreengarden.com/
Open: all year, 10am-6pm
Fee: adult/OAP/student €8, child €3, family ticket (2 adults and all children and 2 maps) €20

4. Dhu Varren garden, Knockreigh, Milltown, Kerry, V93 VX27, IE 

www.dhuvarrengarden.com 

5. Kells Bay House & Garden, Kells, Caherciveen, Co Kerry – section 482 

contact: Billy Alexander
Tel: 066-9477975 

www.kellsbay.ie 

https://www.discoverireland.ie/kerry/kells-bay-house-and-gardens
Open: Jan 1-9, Feb 1-Dec 18, 27-31, Jan 9.30am-4.30pm, Feb, Mar, Nov, Dec, 9.30am-5pm, Apr-Oct 9.30am-6pm
Fee: adult/OAP €8.50, child/student €6, annual membership €30, family €80, couple €55, family ticket €26

6. Knockreer House and Gardens, County Kerry

https://www.discoverireland.ie/kerry/knockreer-house-and-gardens

7. Listowel Castle, co Kerry – open to visit. 

8. Muckross House (or Muckruss),  Killarney, Co Kerry – open to visitors 

9. Ross’s Castle, Killarney, County Kerry

See my OPW write-up:

https://irishhistorichouses.com/2022/01/19/office-of-public-works-properties-munster/

10. Steig Fort, County Kerry

11. Tarbert House, Tarbert, Co. Kerry – section 482

contact: Ursula Leslie
Tel: 068-36198
Open: May, June, July, Aug, Mon-Sat, National Heritage Week Aug 13-21, 10am-12 noon, 2pm-4pm

Fee: adult/OAP/student €5, child free

Places to Stay, County Kerry: 

1. Arbutus Hotel, Killarney, Co Kerry €€ 

https://www.originalirishhotels.com

2. Ballyseede Castle/ Ballyseedy (Tralee Castle), Tralee, county Kerry –hotel €€ www.ballyseedecastle.com

3. Cahernane (or Cahirnane) House, Killarney, Co Kerry – hotel 

https://www.irelands-blue-book.ie/houses.html?country=Kerry

4. Carrig Country House, County Kerry €€€

https://carrighouse.com

5. Castlemorris House, outside Tralee, County Kerry – website not working, linked to the Failte Ireland website:

https://www.discoverireland.ie/accommodation?more-filters=historic_house

6. Castlewood House, Dingle, County Kerry €€

https://www.castlewooddingle.com/about-castlewood/about-us/

7. Churchtown House, Killarney, Co Kerry – whole house rental

https://hiddenireland.com/house-pages/churchtown-house/

8. Coolclogher House, Killarney, co Kerry – whole house rental accommodation https://hiddenireland.com/house-pages/coolclogher-house/ 

9. Dingle Benners Hotel, Dingle, Co Kerry €€ 

https://www.originalirishhotels.com

10. Dromquinna Estate, Co Kerry – accommodation https://www.dromquinnamanor.com

11. Glanleam, Valentia Island, Co Kerry – accommodation €

https://hiddenireland.com/house-pages/glanleam-house/ 

12. Kenmare House, formerly Killarney House, Killarney, Co Kerry – Killarney Park Hotel  €€€

https://www.parkkenmare.com

13. Killeen House Hotel and Rozzers Restaurant, Aghadoe, Killarney, Co Kerry 

https://www.originalirishhotels.com

14. Muxnaw Lodge, Kenmare, Co Kerry € 

https://www.ireland-guide.com/establishment/muxnaw-lodge.3655.html

15. Parknasilla Resort and Spa, Kenmare, Co Kerry https://www.originalirishhotels.com/hotels/type/manor-house-hotels

16. Randles Hotel, Killarney, Co Kerry €€ 

https://www.originalirishhotels.com/hotels/randles-hotel

17. Sneem Hotel, Sneem, Co Kerry www.sneemhotel.com

18. Westcove House – whole house rental, stables and garden cottage, Castlecove Co. Kerry, Ireland https://www.westcove.ie

Kildare:

1. Blackhall Castle, Calverstown, Kilcullen, Co. Kildare – section 482

https://irishhistorichouses.com/2020/05/14/blackhall-castle-calverstown-kilcullen-county-kildare/
contact: Jeffrey & Naomi White
Tel: 087-6771661
Open: May 1-31, Aug 13-22, Sept 1-15, Dec 1-20, 2pm-6pm Fee: Free

2. Burtown House and Garden, Athy, Co. Kildare – section 482

contact: James Fennell
Tel: 059-8623148
www.burtownhouse.ie
Open: May 4-7, 11-14, 18-21, 25-28, June 1-4, 8-11, 15-18, 22-25, July 6-9, 13-16, 19-23, 27-30, August 3-6, 10-21, 24-27, 10am-2pm

Fee: adult €10, OAP/student €5, child under €5 free

3. Castletown House, County Kildare – OPW, see [9]

see my OPW entry: https://irishhistorichouses.com/2022/02/21/office-of-public-works-properties-leinster-carlow-kildare-kilkenny/

4. Coolcarrigan House & Gardens, Coolcarrigan, Coill Dubh, Naas, Co. Kildare – section 482

https://irishhistorichouses.com/2020/05/31/coolcarrigan-house-and-gardens-coill-dubh-naas-county-kildare/
contact: Robert Wilson-Wright
Tel: 086-2580439
www.coolcarrigan.ie
Open: Feb 1-4, 21-25, Mar 1-4, April 23-29, May 9-17, Aug 13-31, Sept 1-9, 14-16, 9am-1pm
Fee: adult €8, OAP/student €5, child free

5. Donadea Forest Park and ruins of Donadea Castle, County Kildare (former home of the Aylmer family up to 1935)

5. Farmersvale House, Badgerhill, Kill, Co. Kildare – section 482

contact: Patricia Orr
Tel: 086-2552661
Open: May 1-18, Aug 1-22, Dec 1-20, 9.30am-1.30pm
Fee: adult €5, student/child/OAP €3, (Irish Georgian Society members free)

6. Griesemount House, Ballitore, Co Kildare – section 482

contact: Katharine Bulbulia
Tel: 087-2414556
www.griesemounthouse.ie
Open: April 4-8, 25-29, May 3-17, June 7-10, 13-26, July 4-8, 11-15, Aug 13-21, 10am-2pm

Fee: adult/OAP/student €5, child €3

7. Harristown House, Brannockstown, Co. Kildare – section 482

https://irishhistorichouses.com/2020/09/27/harristown-brannockstown-county-kildare/
contact: Hubert Beaumont
Tel: 087-2588775
https://www.harristownhouse.ie/
Open: Jan 3-14, Feb 21-28, Mar 1-4, May 3-13, June 13-26, Aug 13-21, Sept 1-9, 9am-1pm

Fee: adult/OAP/student €10, child €5

8. Kildrought House, Celbridge Village, Co. Kildare – section 482

contact: June Stuart
Tel: 01-6271206, 087-6168651
Open: Jan 15-31, Feb 1-3, May 16-31, June 1-3, Aug 11-31, 10am-2pm
Fee: adult €6, OAP/student/child €3, child under 5 years free, school groups €2 per head

9. Larch Hill, Kilcock, Co. Kildare – section 482

contact: Michael De Las Casas
Tel: 087-2213038
www.larchill.ie
Open: May 1-20, 23-31, June 1-10, 14-17, 21-24, 28-30, Aug 13-21, 27-28, 10am- 2pm
Fee: adult/OAP/student €8, child €4, concession for groups

10. Leixlip Castle, Leixlip, Co. Kildare – section 482

https://irishhistorichouses.com/2020/09/04/leixlip-castle-county-kildare-desmond-guinnesss-jewelbox-of-treasures/
contact: Penelope Guinness
Tel: 01-6244430
Open: Jan 31, Feb 1-4, 7-11, Mar 28-31, Apr 1, 4-8, May 9-20, June 7-17, Aug 13-22, Sept 5-11, 9am-1pm

Fee: adult €8, OAP/student/child €4, concessions no charge for school groups

11. Maynooth Castle, County Kildare – OPW, see [9]

12. Millbrook House, County Kildare:

House and limited garden access for groups only

Minimum 4, maximum 8 visitors

May to September: 

Monday-Thursday, 11 am to 3 pm

Open during Heritage Week

13. Moone Abbey House & Tower, Moone Abbey, Moone, Co. Kildare – section 482

https://irishhistorichouses.com/2020/06/13/moone-abbey-house-and-tower-moone-county-kildare/
contact: Jennifer Matuschka
Tel: 087-6900138
Open: May 1-31, Aug 13-21, Sept 1-20, 12 noon- 4pm Fee: adult €8, OAP/student/child €4

14. Moyglare Glebe, Moyglare, Maynooth, Co. Kildare – section 482

contact: Joan Hayden
Tel: 01-8722238
Open: Jan 3-7, 10-14, 17-21, 24-28, May 1-31, Aug 13-21, 8.30am-12.30pm Fee: adult €6, OAP/student/child €3

15. Steam Museum Lodge Park Heritage Centre, Lodge Park, Straffan, Co. Kildare – section 482

contact: Robert C Guinness
Tel: 01-6288412
www.steam-museum.com
Open: June 1-6, 8-12, 15-19, 22-26, 29-30, July 1-3, 6-10, 13-17, 20-24, 27-31, Aug 1, 3-7, 10-21, 24-28, 31, 2pm-6pm,
Fee: adult €7.50, OAP/child/student €5, concession by negotiation

Places to stay, County Kildare:

1. Balyna, Moyvalley, Co Kildare – Moyvalley Hotel https://www.moyvalley.com/balyna-house-weddings.html

2. Barberstown Castle, Kildare – hotel www.barberstowncastle.ie

3. Batty Langley Lodge, Celbridge, County Kildare €€

https://www.irishlandmark.com/propertytag/cottages-and-houses/?gclid=Cj0KCQiApL2QBhC8ARIsAGMm-KFInICcRSxwLSiDxfFNk5WFytNcVrLvOQYhzJbIBes4V-M65iXz0gYaAln_EALw_wcB

Batty Langley Lodge, Castletown, County Kildare.

4. Burtown House holiday cottages – see above

www.burtownhouse.ie

5. Carton House, Kildare – hotel www.cartonhouse.com

6. Castletown Gate House, Celbridge, County Kildare € for 3

https://www.irishlandmark.com/propertytag/cottages-and-houses/?gclid=Cj0KCQiApL2QBhC8ARIsAGMm-KFInICcRSxwLSiDxfFNk5WFytNcVrLvOQYhzJbIBes4V-M65iXz0gYaAln_EALw_wcB

7. Castletown Round House, Celbridge, County Kildare € for 3-6

https://www.irishlandmark.com/property/castletown-round-house/

The Round House at Castletown is one of three adjoining gatelodge buildings – known separately as The Round House, The Pottery and The Gate House.

8. The Cliff at Lyons, County Kildare

www.cliffatlyons.ie

9. The K Club, Straffan House, County Kildare www.kclub.ie

10. Kilkea Castle, Castledermot, Kildare – hotel www.kilkeacastle.ie

11. Leixlip Manor Leixlip, Co Kildare – hotel https://www.leixlipmanorhotel.ie

12. Martinstown House, Kilcullen, Co Kildare – accommodation http://martinstownhouse.com/wordpress/ 

13. Moone Abbey, County Kildare holiday cottages – see above https://www.airbnb.ie/rooms/11415715?source_impression_id=p3_1646847728_W3hyRercGEyRM%2FwC

Whole house accommodation in County Kildare:

1. de Burgh Manor, Kilberry, County Kildare – whole house rental 

https://www.deburghmanor.ie

2. Griesemount House, County Kildare, whole house rentals – see above

Kilkenny:

1. Aylwardstown, Glenmore, Co Kilkenny – section 482 

contact: Nicholas & Mary Kelly
Tel: 051-880464, 087-2567866
Open: Aug 1-31, Sept 1-30, 9am-5pm Fee: adult €5, OAP €3, child/student free

2. Ballysallagh House, Johnswell, Co Kilkenny – section 482 

contact: Geralyn & Kieran White
Tel: 087-2906621, 086-2322105
Open: Feb 1-20, May 1-31, Aug 13-21, 9am-1pm
Fee: adult €7.50, OAP/student €5, child free, groups by arrangement

3. Creamery House, Castlecomer, Co Kilkenny – 482 

contact: John Comerford
Tel: 056-4400080
www.creameryhouse.com
Open: May 14-Sept 30, Friday, Saturday, and Sundays, National Heritage Week, Aug 13-21, 12 noon-5pm

Fee: adult/OAP/student €5, child under 18 free

4.  Kilfane Glen & Waterfall Garden, Thomastown, County Kilkenny – 482 – garden only

https://irishhistorichouses.com/2021/12/16/kilfane-glen-waterfall-kilfane-thomastown-co-kilkenny/
contact: Susan Mosse
Tel: 056-7727105, 086-7919318 

www.kilfane.com

Open: July 1-31, Aug 1-31, 11am-6pm
Fee: adult €7, OAP/student €6.50, child €6, family €20

5. Kilkenny Castle, Kilkenny – OPW

see my OPW entry, https://irishhistorichouses.com/2022/02/21/office-of-public-works-properties-leinster-carlow-kildare-kilkenny/

6. Kilkenny Design Centre, Castle Yard, Kilkenny – Design Centre on 482 

contact: Aaron Quill
Tel: 064-6623331
www.kilkennydesign.com
Open: all year except Christmas Day and St Stephens Day, 10am-7pm Fee: Free

7. Kilrush House, County Kilkenny, ihh member, by appt. 

8. Rothe House, Kilkenny, County Kilkenny  

9. Shankill Castle, Paulstown, Co. Kilkenny – section 482 

contact: Geoffrey Cope,
Tel: 087-2437125
www.shankillcastle.com
Open: Feb 5-6, 12-13, 19-20, 26-27, Mar 5-6, 12-13, 19-20, 26-27, Apr 2-3, 9-10, 16- 17, 23-24, 30, May 1, 5-8, 12-15, 19-22, 26-29, June 2-5, 9-12, 16-19, 23-26, 30, July 1-3, 7-16, 21-24, 28-31, Aug 3-6, 10-21, 24-27, 31, Sept 1-4, 8-11, 15-18, 22-25, 29- 30, Oct 1-2, 8-9, 15-16, 22-23, 29-30, 31, Feb- Apr, 11am-4pm, May- Oct, 11am-5pm Fee: house & garden, adult €10 garden €5, OAP/student €8, gardens €4

10. Tybroughney Castle, Piltown, Co Kilkenny – 482 

contact: Louis Dowley
Tel: 087-2313106
Open: Aug 1-31, Sept 1-30, 10am-4pm Fee: adult €5, student €3, child/OAP free

11. Woodstock Gardens and Arboretum, Woodstock, Inistioge, Kilkenny, maintained by Kilkenny County Council

Places to stay, County Kilkenny

1. Ballyduff, Thomastown, Co Kilkenny – wedding venue, B&B 

http://ballyduffhouse.ie/booking-enquiries/ 

2. Blanchville Coachyard, Dunbell, County Kilkenny €

https://blanchville.ie/

3. Butler House, Kilkenny, co Kilkenny – accommodation https://www.butler.ie/ 

4. Grange Manor, Ballyragget, County Kilkenny B&B http://grangemanorkilkenny.com

5. Lyrath Estate, near Kilkenny, County Kilkenny – hotel https://www.lyrath.com

6. Mount Juliet, Thomastown, County Kilkenny – hotel 

7. Shankill Castle, Co Kilkenny – see above

8. Waterside Guest House, Graiguenamanagh, County Kilkenny

https://www.watersideguesthouse.com

Whole House rental, County Kilkenny:

1. Annamult House, Bennettsbridge, Co Kilkenny – whole house rental 

https://annamultcountryhouseestate.com/terms-and-conditions/

2. Ballybur Castle, County Kilkenny €€€ for two, € for 10

http://www.ballyburcastle.com/

3. Castle Blunden, County Kilkenny whole house rental

hhiref@castleblunden.com

4. Clomantagh Castle, Co Kilkenny – whole house on airbnb: €€ for two, € for 3-8

https://www.airbnb.ie/rooms/29346656?federated_search_id=050f383f-6e5e-45b5-9989-b166bfe7e70d&source_impression_id=p3_1650104926_er%2FjFSqCgEWzQLW5

 https://www.airbnb.ie/rooms/29346656?source_impression_id=p3_1646838859_B9E3WKYf8cWwx5Ku

5. Tubbrid Castle, County Kilkenny €€€ for two, € for 8

Laois:

1. Ballaghmore Castle, Borris in Ossory, Co. Laois – section 482

contact: Grace Pym
Tel: 0505-21453
www.castleballaghmore.com
Open: all year except Christmas Day, 10am-6pm Fee: adult €5, child/OAP/student €3, family of 4, €10

2. Ballintubbert House and Gardens, Stradbally, Co Laois – open to public  https://www.discoverireland.ie/laois/ballintubbert-gardens-house

3. Gardens at Castle Durrow, County Laois

www.castledurrow.com 

4. Clonohill Gardens, Coolrain, Portlaoise, Laois

https://www.gardensofireland.org/directory/31/clonohill+gardens/

5. Emo Court, County Laois – OPW

see my OPW entry, https://irishhistorichouses.com/2022/02/07/office-of-public-works-properties-leinster-laois-longford-louth-meath-offaly-westmeath-wexford-wicklow/

6. Heywood Gardens, County Laois – OPW

see my OPW entry: https://irishhistorichouses.com/2022/02/07/office-of-public-works-properties-leinster-laois-longford-louth-meath-offaly-westmeath-wexford-wicklow/

7. Stradbally Hall, Stradbally, Co. Laois – section 482

contact: Thomas Cosby
Tel: 086-8519272
www.stradballyhall.ie
Open: May 1-31, June 1-9, Aug 13-21, Oct 1-14, 9am-1pm Fee: adult €10, OAP/student €5, child free

https://irishhistorichouses.com/2021/10/14/stradbally-hall-stradbally-co-laois/

Places to Stay, County Laois:

1. Ballaghmore Castle, Borris in Ossory, Co. Laois – section 482

www.castleballaghmore.com

 2. Ballyfin House, Co. Laois – hotel €€€ 

www.ballyfin.com

3. Castle Durrow, Co Laois – a hotel www.castledurrow.com

4. Coolanowle Country House, Ballickmoyler, County Laois

http://www.coolanowle.com

5. Roundwood, Mountrath, Co Laois – guest house https://roundwoodhouse.com 

and the forge and writer’s cottage at Roundwood.

Whole House Rental County Laois:

1. Preston House, Abbeyleix, County Laois

https://hiddenireland.com/house-pages/preston-house/

Leitrim:

1. Lough Rynn Castle gardens, Mohill, Co Leitrim 

2. Manorhamilton Castle (Ruin), Castle St, Manorhamilton, Co. Leitrim – section 482

contact: Anthony Daly
Tel: 086-2502593 

www.manorhamilton.ie

Open: Mar 6-31, April 3-Oct 31, Nov 3-6, 10-13, 17-20, 24-27, Dec 1-4, 8-11, 15-18, 9am-4pm
Fee: adult €5, audio €10, child free

3. Parke’s Castle, County Leitrim (OPW)

Leitrim Places to stay:

1. Bush Hotel, Carrick on Shannon, Co Leitrim

https://www.bushhotel.com/ 

2. Lough Rynn Castle, Mohill, County Leitrim

https://www.loughrynn.ie/

Limerick:

1. Ash Hill, Kilmallock, Co. Limerick – section 482

contact: Simon and Nicole Johnson
Tel: 063-98035
www.ashhill.com
(Tourist Accommodation Facility)
Open: Apr 1-Sept 30, 9.30am-4.30pm Fee: adult €5, child/OAP/student €3

2. Ballynacourty, Ballysteen, Askeaton, Limerick, Co Limerick – gardens open 

www.stacpooleantiques.com 

3. Coolwater Gardens, www.coolwatergarden.com 

4. Desmond Castle, Newcastle West, Co Limerick (Desmond Hall) – OPW

see my OPW entry

5. Desmond Castle, Adare, Co Limerick (also called Adare Castle) – OPW

see my OPW entry

6. Glebe House, Holycross, Bruff, Co. Limerick – section 482

contact: Kate Hayes and Colm McCarthy
Tel: 087-6487556
Open: Jan 4-7, 10-14, 17-21, 24-28, 31, Aug 13-22, Sept 1-30, Mon-Fri, 5.30pm- 9.30pm, Sat-Sun, 8am-12 noon

Fee: Free

7. Glenville House, Glenville, Ardagh, Co. Limerick – section 482

contact: Owen O’Neill
Tel: 086-2541435
Open: Apr 1-30, May 1-31, Sept 1-13, Tue-Sat, Aug 13-21, 9.30am-1.30pm Fee: adult €5, OAP/student €3, child free

8. Glenstal Abbey, County Limerick

9. Glenquin Castle, Newcastle West, Co Limerick – open to visitors 

10. Kilpeacon House, Crecora, Co. Limerick – section 482

contact: Donie and Mary Costello
Tel: 087-9852462
Open: May 3-June 30, Mon- Sat, Aug 13-21, 10am-2pm Fee: adult €8, child/OAP/student €4

11. King John’s Castle, Limerick

maintained by Shannon Heritage

12. Knockpatrick Garden, Knockpatrick, Foynes, Limerick, IE 

myinfo.ie/Knockpatrick-Gardens 

https://www.gardensofireland.org/directory/37/knockpatrick+gardens/

13. Mount Trenchard House and Garden, Foynes, Co. Limerick – section 482

contact: Frieda Keane Carmody
Tel: 087-2220692
Open: June 1-31, July 1-31, Aug 1-31, 10am-4pm Fee: adult €10, child/OAP/student €5

14. Odellville House, Ballingarry, Co. Limerick – section 482

contact: Aisling Frawley
Tel: 085-8895125
www.odellville.simplesite.com
Open: May 1-31, June 1-30, Aug 13-21, 10am-2pm Fee: adult €8, student/OAP/child €4

15. The Turret, Ryanes, Ballyingarry, Co. Limerick – section 482

contact: Donal Mc Goey
Tel: 086-2432174
Open: May 1-31, June 1-30, July 1-31, Aug 1-31,12 noon-4pm Fee: adult €5, OAP/child/student/ free

16. The Old Rectory, Rathkeale, Co. Limerick – section 482

contact: John Roche
Tel: 087-8269123
Open: May 1-Nov 27, Saturday and Sundays, National Heritage Week, Aug 13-21 10am-2pm

Fee: adult €8, child/OAP/student €3

Places to stay, County Limerick:

1. Adare Manor, Limerick – hotel €€€

Adare Manor, Limerick, October 2012.

2. Ash Hill Towers, Kilmallock, Co Limerick – section 482, Hidden Ireland accommodation €

https://www.ashhill.com

3. The Dunraven, Adare, Co Limerick 

https://www.dunravenhotel.com/

4. Flemingstown House, Kilmallock, Co. Limerick, Ireland – whole house rental and a self-catering cottage

https://flemingstownhouse.com

5. Longcourt House Hotel, Newcastle West, Co Limerick 

https://www.longcourthousehotel.ie/our-story/

6. Woodlands House and Spa, Adare, Co Limerick €€ 

https://www.woodlands-hotel.ie/home/history/

Whole House Rental County Limerick:

1. Ballyteigue House, Bruree, Co. Limerick – whole house rental per week. €€ for two, € for 4-10

https://hiddenireland.com/stay/self-catering-holiday-rentals/

2. Flemingstown House, Kilmallock, Co. Limerick, Ireland whole house accommodation, up to 11 guests. €€€ for two for a week, € for 4-11

3. Glin Castle, County Limerick – whole house rental www.glin-castle.com

4. Springfield Castle, Drumcollogher, Co. Limerick, Ireland – whole house rental €€€ for 2, € for 5-25. https://www.springfieldcastle.com

Longford:

1. Castlecor House, County Longford, open by previous arrangement:

https://castlecorhouse.com/

2. Maria Edgeworth Visitor Centre, Longford, County Longford.

https://www.discoverireland.ie/longford/the-maria-edgeworth-visitor-centre

3. Moorhill House, Castlenugent, Lisryan, Co. Longford – section 482

contact: Michael O’Donnell
Tel: 047-81952
Open: Aug 1-31, Sept 1-29, 9.30am-1.30pm
Fee: adult/OAP/student/child €8

Places to stay, County Longford:

1. Castlecor House, County Longford

https://castlecorhouse.com/

2. Newcastle House Hotel, County Longford.

3. Viewmount House, Longford

http://viewmounthouse.com

Discover this boutique gem, a secret tucked away in the heart of Ireland. This magnificent 17th century manor is complemented by its incredible countryside surroundings, and by the four acres of meticulously-maintained garden that surround it. Within the manor you’ll find a place of character, with open fires, beautiful furniture, fresh flowers and Irish literature. The manor retains its stately, historic charm, and blends it with thoughtful renovation that incorporates modern comfort.

Louth

1. Barmeath Castle, Dunleer, Drogheda, Co. Louth – section 482

https://irishhistorichouses.com/2020/10/23/barmeath-castle-dunleer-drogheda-county-louth/

contact: Bryan Bellew
Tel: 041-6851205
Open: May 1-31, June 1-10, Aug 13-21, Oct 1-10, 9am-1pm Fee: adult /OAP/student €5, child free

2. Castle Bellingham, Co. Louth

3. Collon House, County Louth

4. Killineer House & Garden, Drogheda, Co. Louth – section 482

https://irishhistorichouses.com/2021/08/10/killineer-house-county-louth/
contact: Charles & Eithne Carroll
Tel: 086-2323783
www.killineerhouse.ie
Open: Feb 1-20, May 1-15, June 1-10, Aug 10-24, 9am-1pm
Fee: adult/OAP/child/student, house: €4, garden €6

5. Rokeby Hall, Grangebellew, Co. Louth – section 482

https://irishhistorichouses.com/2020/08/17/rokeby-hall-grangebellew-county-louth/
contact: Jean Young
Tel: 086-8644228
www.rokeby.ie
Open: May 1-31, Mon-Sat, Aug 13-21, Sept 1-30, Mon-Sat, 10am-2pm Fee: adult/OAP €7, child/student €5

Places to stay, County Louth:

1. Ballymascanlon House, Louth  – hotel https://www.ballymascanlon.com

2. Collon House, Ardee Street, Collon, Louth [also Oriel Temple] – B&B, plus guided tours www.collonhouse.com

3. Ghan House, Co Louth – accommodation www.ghanhouse.com

4.  Hatch’s Castle, Ardee, Co Louth – accommodation 

Whole House accommodation, County Louth:

1. Barmeath Castle, Dunleer, Drogheda, Co. Louth – section 482

2. Castle Bellingham, co. Louth – for weddings only 

https://www.originalirishhotels.com

Mayo:

1. Belleek Castle and Ballina House, originally Belleek Castle, Ballina, Mayo – hotel and gives tours 

2. Brookhill House, Brookhill, Claremorris, Co. Mayo – section 482

contact: Patricia and John Noone
Tel: 094-9371348, 087-3690499, 086-2459832
Open: Jan 13-20, Apr 13-20, May 18-24, June 8-14, July 13-19, Aug 1-25, 2pm-6pm
Fee: adult €6, OAP/child/student €3, National Heritage Week free

3. Enniscoe House & Gardens, Castlehill, Ballina, Co. Mayo – section 482

https://irishhistorichouses.com/2021/11/25/enniscoe-house-gardens-castlehill-ballina-co-mayo/
contact: Susan Kellett
Tel: 096-31112
www.enniscoe.com
(Tourist Accommodation Facility)
Open: April 1-Oct 31
Open: garden, April 1-Oct 31, 10am-5pm,
Fee: garden & heritage centre adult €8, OAP €6, child €3 under 4 years free, student €3, family 2 adults and 2 children €15, tour of house €5 per adult, free tour in National Heritage Week

4. Old Coastguard Station, Rosmoney, Westport, Co. Mayo – section 482

contact: James Cahill
Tel: 094-9025500
www.jamescahill.com/coastguardstation.html
Open: July 1-Sept 9 closed Sundays, National Heritage Week Aug 13-21, 11am-4pm
Fee: €1

5. Owenmore, Garranard, Ballina, Co. Mayo – section 482

contact: Jerry O’ Mara
Tel: 087-2446744 

www.owenbeg.ie

(Tourist Accommodation FacilityOpen: March-Oct and Dec

6. Partry House, Mayo

http://www.museumsofmayo.com/partry-house/partry-house.html

7. Prizon House, Prizon North, Balla, Co. Mayo – section 482

contact: Tom O’Connor
Tel: 087-9032133

www.prisonehouse.wordpress.com
Open: May 1-31, June 1-30, July 1-31, Aug 1-31, 2pm-6pm Fee: adult €5, student/OAP/child free

8. Turlough Park, Museum of Country Life, Mayo

9. Westport House, County Mayo

Places to stay, County Mayo:

1. Ashford Castle, Mayo/Galway – hotel €€€

2. Belleek Castle and Ballina House, originally Belleek Castle, Ballina, Mayo – hotel and gives tours €€ www.belleekcastle.com

3. Breaffy House resort (or Breaghwy), Castlebar, Co Mayo – hotel www.breaffyhouseresort.com

4. Enniscoe House, Castlehill, Ballina, Co Mayo – section 482  – accommodation 

5. Knockranny House Hotel and Spa, County Mayo www.knockrannyhousehotel.ie

6.  Mount Falcon, Ballina, County Mayo – hotel €€ www.mountfalcon.com

7. Newport House, Newport, Co. Mayo, Ireland

http://www.newporthouse.ie

8. Owenmore, Garranard, Ballina, Co. Mayo – section 482 www.owenbeag.ie

contact: Jerry O’ Mara
Tel: 087-2446744 

(Tourist Accommodation FacilityOpen: March-Oct and Dec

9. Turin Castle, Turin, Kilmaine, Co. Mayo, Ireland – whole castle rental, €€ for two, € for 10-12

http://turincastle.com

10. Westbrook Country House, Castlebar, County Mayo https://www.westbrookhousemayo.com

Meath

1. Balrath, Kells, Co Meath –  accommodation and sometimes open for visits

2. Beau Parc House, Beau Parc, Navan, Co. Meath – section 482

contact: Emer Mooney
Tel: 041-9824163, 087-2329149
Open: Mar 1-20, May 1-31, Aug 13-21, 10am-2 pm Fee: adult €10, OAP/student/child €8

3. Cillghrian Glebe now known as Boyne House Slane, Chapel Street, Slane, Co. Meath – section 482

contact: Alan Haugh
Tel: 041-9884444
www.boynehouseslane.ie
Open: all year, National Heritage Week, Aug 13-21, 9am-1pm Fee: Free

4. Dardistown Castle, Dardistown, Julianstown, Co. Meath – section 482

https://irishhistorichouses.com/2019/07/19/dardistown-castle-county-meath/
contact: Lizanne Allen
Tel: 086 -2774271
www.dardistowncastle.ie
Open: Jan 8-31, July 1-23, closed Sundays, August 8-28, 10am-2pm Fee: adult €6, student/OAP/child €3

5. Dunsany Castle, Dunsany, Co. Meath – section 482

contact: Randall Plunkett
Tel: 046-9025169
www.dunsany.com
Open: June 24-30, July 1-31, Aug 1-22, 10am-2pm
Fee: adult €25, OAP/student/12-18 years €15, child under 12 years free, National Heritage Week €10, under 12 years free

6. Gravelmount House, Castletown, Kilpatrick, Navan, Co. Meath – section 482

contact: Brian McKenna
Tel: 087-2520523
Open: Jan 2-15, May 10-30, Aug 13-22, Sept 1-15, 9am-1pm Fee: adult €6, OAP/student/child €3

7. Hamwood House, Dunboyne, Co. Meath – section 482

contact: Charles Hamilton
Tel: 086-3722701
www.hamwood.ie
Open: Apr 1-Sept 25, Fri-Sun, National Heritage Week, Aug 13-21, 10am-7pm Fee: adult €10, child under 12 free

8. Kilgar Gardens, Kilgar house, Gallow, Kilcock, Co Meath W23E7FK www.kilgargardens.com

9. Killeen Mill, Clavinstown, Drumree, Co. Meath – section 482

contact: Dermot Kealy
Tel: 086-2619979
(Tourists Accommodation Facility) Open: April 1- Sept 30

10. Loughcrew House, Loughcrew, Old Castle, Co. Meath – section 482

Contact: Emily Naper
Tel: 049-8541356
(Tourist Accommodation FacilityOpen: all year

www.loughcrew.com

Garden: all year, 11am-5pm
Fee: adult €7, OAP €6, student €5, child €3.50, group concessions

11. Moyglare House, Moyglare, Co. Meath – section 482

https://irishhistorichouses.com/2021/02/15/moyglare-house-county-meath/
Postal address Maynooth Co. Kildare
contact: Angela Alexander
Tel: 086-0537291
www.moyglarehouse.ie
Open: Jan 3-7, 10-14, 17-21, 24-28, 31, May 1-21, 23-27, 30-31, June 1-2, Aug 12- 21, 9am-1pm
Fee: adult €7.50, OAP/student/child

12. Oldbridge House, County Meath – Battle of the Boyne Museum – OPW

see my OPW entry, https://irishhistorichouses.com/2022/02/07/office-of-public-works-properties-leinster-laois-longford-louth-meath-offaly-westmeath-wexford-wicklow/

13. Slane Castle, Slane, Co. Meath – section 482

https://irishhistorichouses.com/2019/07/19/slane-castle-county-meath/
contact: Jemma Smith
Tel: 041-9884477
www.slanecastle.ie
Open: Jan 16, 23, 30Feb 6, 13, 20, 27, Mar 5-6, 12-13, 19-20, 26-27, April 2-3, 9- 10, 16-18, 23-24, 30, May 1-2, 6-8, 13-15, 20-23, June 3, 6, 10, 17, 24, July 1, 7-8, 14-15, 22, 28, 31, Aug 1, 4-5, 11-21, 25-26, 28, Sept 4,18, 25, Jan- Apr, and June 10am-4pm, May, Fri-Sat, 10am-4pm, Sunday, 12 noon 4pm, July, Thurs-Sat, 10am- 4pm, Sunday, 12 noon-4pm, Aug, Mon-Sat, 10am-4pm, Sunday, 12 noon-4pm, Sept, Sunday, 12 noon-4pm

Fee: adult €14, OAP/student €12.50, child €7.50, concession family ticket (2 adults and 2 children €39, additional adults €1, additional children €6

14. St. Mary’s Abbey, High Street, Trim, Co. Meath – section 482

contact: Peter Higgins
Tel: 087-2057176
Open: Jan 24-28, 31, Feb 1-4, 28, Mar 1-4, 7-11, May 7-22, June 27-30, July 1, 4-8, Aug 13-22, Sept 27-30, 2pm-6pm

Fee: adult €5, OAP/student/child €2

15. The Former Parochial House, Slane, Co. Meath – section 482

contact: Alan Haugh
Tel: 087-2566998
www.parochialhouseslane.ie
Open: May 1-Sept 30, Mon-Sat, National Heritage Week, Aug 13-21, 9am-1pm Fee: adult 5, child/OAP/student €3

16. Swainstown House, Kilmessan, Co. Meath – section 482

https://irishhistorichouses.com/2020/10/10/swainstown-house-kilmessan-county-meath/
contact: Caroline Preston
Tel: 086-2577939
Open: Mar 7-8, 10-11, April 4-5, 7-8, May 2-8, June 6-12, July 4-10, Aug 13-21, Sept 5-16, Oct 3-4, 6-7, Nov 7-8, 10-11, Dec 5-6, 8-9, 11am-3pm

Fee: adult/OAP/student €5, child free

17. Tankardstown House, Rathkenny, Slane, Co. Meath – section 482

https://irishhistorichouses.com/2020/07/11/tankardstown-estate-demesne-rathkenny-slane-co-meath/
contact: Brian Conroy
Tel: 087-2888925
www.tankardstown.ie
Open: all year including National Heritage Week, Aug 13-21, 9am-1pm Fee: Free

18. Trim Castle, County Meath – OPW

see my OPW entry: https://irishhistorichouses.com/2022/02/07/office-of-public-works-properties-leinster-laois-longford-louth-meath-offaly-westmeath-wexford-wicklow/

Places to stay, County Meath:

1. Balrath House and Courtyard, Balrath, Navan, Co. Meath tel:+ 353 (0)41 982 5749 

http://balrathcourtyard.com

2. Bellinter House near Bective, County Meath – hotel and restaurant https://www.bellinterhouse.com

3. Cillghrian Glebe now known as Boyne House Slane, Chapel Street, Slane, Co. Meath – see above

contact: Alan Haugh
Tel: 041-9884444
www.boynehouseslane.ie

4. Clonleason Gate Lodge, Fordstown, County Meath

https://hiddenireland.com/house-pages/clonleason-gate-lodge/

Our 18th century riverside cottage has been converted into an elegant one bedroom hideaway for a couple.Set in blissful surroundings of gardens and fields at the entrance to a small Georgian house, the cottage is surrounded by ancient oak trees, beech and roses. It offers peace and tranquillity just one hour from Dublin.

A feature of the cottage is the comfy light filled sitting room with high ceiling,windows on three sides, an open fire, bundles of books and original art. The Trimblestown river, once famous for its excellent trout, runs along the bottom of its secret rose garden. Garden and nature lovers might enjoy wandering through our extensive and richly planted gardens where many unusual shrubs and trees are thriving and where cyclamen and snowdrops are massed under trees.The Girley Loop Bog walk is just a mile down the road.

The bedroom is luxurious and the kitchen and bathroom are well appointed. There is excellent electric heating throughout.

5. Crow’s Hermitage, Ardcath, County Meath

https://www.crowshermitage.com/

6. Dardistown Castle, Dardistown, Julianstown, Co. Meath – section 482, see above

https://irishhistorichouses.com/2019/07/19/dardistown-castle-county-meath/
contact: Lizanne Allen
Tel: 086 -2774271
www.dardistowncastle.ie
Open: Jan 8-31, July 1-23, closed Sundays, August 8-28, 10am-2pm Fee: adult €6, student/OAP/child €3

7. Highfield House, Trim, County Meath

https://highfieldguesthouse.com

8. The Johnstown Estate, Enfield, Co Meath – hotel https://thejohnstownestate.com

9. Killyon manor, County Meath, holiday cottages

https://www.killyonmanor.com/

10. Killeen Mill, Clavinstown, Drumree, Co. Meath – section 482

contact: Dermot Kealy
Tel: 086-2619979
(Tourists Accommodation Facility) Open: April 1- Sept 30

11. Moyglare House, Moyglare, Co. Meath – section 482

https://irishhistorichouses.com/2021/02/15/moyglare-house-county-meath/
Postal address Maynooth Co. Kildare
contact: Angela Alexander
Tel: 086-0537291
www.moyglarehouse.ie
Open: Jan 3-7, 10-14, 17-21, 24-28, 31, May 1-21, 23-27, 30-31, June 1-2, Aug 12- 21, 9am-1pm
Fee: adult €7.50, OAP/student/child

12. Ross Castle, Mountnugent, County Meath whole castle €€€ for 2, € for 10 or self-catering accommodation €

13. Rossnaree, Slane, Co Meath – accommodation 

http://www.rossnaree.ie/rooms  

13. Tankardstown House, Rathkenny, Slane, Co. Meath – section 482

https://irishhistorichouses.com/2020/07/11/tankardstown-estate-demesne-rathkenny-slane-co-meath/
contact: Brian Conroy
Tel: 087-2888925
www.tankardstown.ie
Open: all year including National Heritage Week, Aug 13-21, 9am-1pm Fee: Free

Whole house booking/wedding venues, County Meath

1. Boyne Hill estate, Navan, County Meath – whole house rental https://www.boynehillhouse.ie

2. Durhamstown Castle, Bohermeen, County Meath – whole house rental https://durhamstowncastle.com

3. Loughcrew House, Loughcrew, Old Castle, Co. Meath – section 482

Contact: Emily Naper
Tel: 049-8541356
(Tourist Accommodation FacilityOpen: all year

www.loughcrew.com

4. Mill House, Slane www.themillhouse.ie

5. Ross Castle, Mountnugent, County Meath whole castle €€€ for 2, € for 10 or self-catering accommodation €

Monaghan:

1. Castle Leslie, Glaslough, Co. Monaghan – section 482

https://irishhistorichouses.com/2020/08/07/castle-leslie-glaslough-county-monaghan/
contact: Samantha Leslie
Tel: 047-88091
www.castleleslie.com
(Tourist Accommodation Facility)
Open: all year, National Heritage Week events August 13-21, 9am-1pm.
Fee: Free

2. Hilton Park House, Clones, Co. Monaghan – section 482

contact: Fred Madden
Tel 047-56007
www.hiltonpark.ie
(Tourist Accommodation Facility)
Open: April- Sept
House and garden tours available for groups Jan 31, Feb 1-4, 7-11, 28, Mar 1-4, 7-11, May 3-6, 8-20, June 2, 13-17, 20-24, National Heritage Week, Aug 13-21, Sept 11, 18, 25, weekdays, 9am-1pm, Sunday, 1pm-5pm
Fee: adult €10, OAP/student €8, child €5

3. Mullan Village and Mill, Mullan, Emyvale, Co. Monaghan – section 482

contact: Michael Treanor
Tel: 047-81135
www.mullanvillage.com
Open: Aug 1-31, Sept 1-30, 2pm-6.30pm
Fee: €6

Places to stay, County Monaghan

1. Castle Leslie, Glaslough, Co. Monaghan – section 482

https://irishhistorichouses.com/2020/08/07/castle-leslie-glaslough-county-monaghan/
contact: Samantha Leslie
Tel: 047-88091
www.castleleslie.com
(Tourist Accommodation Facility)
Open: all year, National Heritage Week events August 13-21, 9am-1pm.

2. Hilton Park House, Clones, Co. Monaghan – section 482, see above
contact: Fred Madden
Tel 047-56007
www.hiltonpark.ie
(Tourist Accommodation Facility)
Open: April- Sept

Offaly:

1. Ballindoolin House, Edenderry, Co. Offaly – section 482

contact: Rudolf Prosoroff
Tel: 0043 676 5570097
Open: April 4-8, 19-28, May 2-5, 7-12, 14-19, 21-26, 30-31, June 1-2, 6-9, 13-16, 20- 23, 27-30, Aug 13-21, 10am-2pm

Fee: adult €10, student /OAP/child €5

2. Ballybrittan Castle, Ballybrittan, Edenderry, Co. Offaly – section 482

contact: Rosemarie
Tel: 087-2469802 

www.ballybrittancastle.com

Open: Jan 30-31, Feb 6-7, 13-14, 20-21, 27-28, May 1-31, Aug 13-21, Sept 21-30, 2pm-6pm.
Fee: Free – except in case of large groups a fee of €5 p.p.

3. Birr Castle, Birr, Co. Offaly – section 482

contact: Alicia Clements Tel: 057-9120056

www.birrcastle.com

Open: May 17-Aug 31, Mon-Sat, National Heritage Week, Aug 13-21, Sept 1-2, 10am-2pm
Fee: adult/OAP/student €20, child free,

4. Boland’s Lock, Cappincur, Tullamore, Co. Offaly – section 482

contact: Martin O’Rourke
Tel: 086-2594914
Open: June 1-30, July 1-31, Aug 1-31, 12 noon-4pm Fee: adult €2, student/child free, family €5

5. Charleville Castle, County Offaly

6. Clonony Castle, County Offaly

7. Corolanty House, Shinrone, Birr, Co. Offaly – section 482

contact: Siobhan Webb
Tel: 086-1209984
Open: Jan, Feb, July, Aug, Sept, daily 2pm-6pm Fee: Free

8. Crotty Church, Castle Street, Birr, Co. Offaly section 482

contact: Eoin Garry
Tel: 086-3286277
Open: all year, 1pm-5pm Fee: Free

9. Gloster House, Brosna, Birr, Co. Offaly – section 482

contact: Tom & Mary Alexander
Tel: 087-2342135
Open: Jan 3-28, Mon-Fri, May 1-31, Aug 13-21, 9am-1.30pm Fee: adult/student/child/OAP €7

10. High Street House, High Street, Tullamore, Co. Offaly – section 482

contact: George Ross
Tel: 086-3831992

www.no6highstreet.com

Open: Jan 4-31, Mon -Fri, May 1-18, Aug 13-21, Sept 1-24, 9.30am-1.30pm Fee: adult/student €5, OAP €4, child under 12 free

11. Leap Castle, County Offaly

https://www.discoverireland.ie/galway/ballynahinch-castle-hotel-and-gardens

12. Loughton, Moneygall, Birr, Co. Offaly – section 482

https://irishhistorichouses.com/2020/11/01/loughton-house-moneygall-county-offaly/
contact: Michael Lyons 
Tel: 089-4319150
www.loughtonhouse.com
Open: May 10-June 30, Tue-Sunday, Aug 2-7, 9-21, 11am-3.30pm
Fee: adult €5, OAP/student €4, child €3 (under 12 free), family (2 adults & 2 children over 12) €15

13. Springfield House, Mount Lucas, Daingean, Tullamore, Co. Offaly – section 482

contact: Muireann Noonan
Tel: 087-2204569
www.springfieldhouse.ie

Open: Jan 1-9, 1pm-5pm, April 15-19, May 21-29, June 10-12, 17-19, July 1-3, 8-10, 15-17, Aug 13-28, 2pm-6pm, Dec 26-31, 1pm-5pm
Fee: Free

14. The Maltings, Castle Street, Birr, Co. Offaly – section 482

contact: Eoin Garry
Tel: 086-3286277 

www.canbe.ie

(Tourist Accommodation FacilityOpen: all year

15. Woodland Cottage Garden, Birr, Offaly 

https://www.gardensofireland.org/directory/42/woodland+cottage+garden/

Contact: Anne Ward 

Tel: +353 (0) 57 912 1215 

Mobile: +353 (0) 86 305 1697 

Email: nanoward@eircom.net 

Web: www.loughderggardens.com 

Places to stay, County Offaly

1. Kinnitty Castle (formerly Castle Bernard), Kinnity, Co Offaly www.kinnittycastlehotel.com

2. Loughton House, County Offaly

https://loughtonhouse.com

3. The Maltings, Castle Street, Birr, Co. Offaly

contact: Eoin Garry
Tel: 086-3286277 

www.canbe.ie

(Tourist Accommodation FacilityOpen: all year

Whole House Rental County Offaly:

1. Ballycumber, County Offaly – whole house rental https://www.airbnb.ie/rooms/21064152?source_impression_id=p3_1646848147_zcYarfp2zhDKFdHo

Roscommon:

1. Castlecoote House, Castlecoote, Co. Roscommon – section 482

contact: Kevin Finnerty
Tel: 087-2587537
www.castlecootehouse.com
Open: July1-31, Aug 1-31
Garden-guided tours, 2pm-6pm
Home of the Percy French Festival, www.percyfrench.ie 

July 20,21,22, 10am-4pm Fee: €5

2. Clonalis House, Castlerea, Co. Roscommon – section 482

https://irishhistorichouses.com/2020/10/16/clonalis-castlerea-county-roscommon/
contact: Pyers O’Conor Nash, Richard O’Connor Nash
Tel: 094-9620014, 087-3371667
(Tourist Accommodation Facility)
April 1-September 30
www.clonalishouse.com
Open: Jun 1-Aug 31, Mon-Sat, National Heritage Week, Aug 13-21, guided tours,11am-4pm
Fee: adult €10, child €5, group rates available

Clonalis, County Roscommon.

3. King House, Main Street, Boyle, Co. Roscommon – section 482

contact: Majella Hunt
Tel: 090-6637100

www.visitkinghouse.ie

Open: April 1-Sept 30, National Heritage Week Aug 13-21, Mon-Sat 11am-5pm, Sunday 11am-4pm
Fee: adult €7, OAP/student /child €5, Family €20

4. Shannonbridge Fortifications, Shannonbridge, Athlone, Co. Roscommon – section 482

contact: Fergal Moran
Tel: 090-9674973 

www.shannonbridgefortifications.ie 

Open: May 1-Sept 30, 10am-6pm

Fee: Free

5. Strokestown Park House, Strokestown Park House, Strokestown, Co. Roscommon – section 482

contact: Ciarán
Tel: 01-8748030
www.strokestownpark.ie www.irishheritagetrust.ie
Open: Mar 17-Dec 20, Mar, Apr, May, Sept, Oct, 10am-5pm, June, July, Aug, 10am- 6pm, Nov, Dec 10.30am-4pm

Fee: adult €14, €12.50, €9.25, OAP/student €12.50, child €6, family €29, groups €11.50

Places to stay, County Roscommon:

1. Abbey Hotel, Abbeytown, Ballypheasan, Roscommon, Co Roscommon www.abbeyhotel.ie

2. Castlecoote, County Roscommon – Section 482

www.castlecootehouse.com

3. Clonalis House, Castlerea, Co Roscommon – accommodation and 482 

www.clonalishouse.com

4. Edmondstown (Bishop’s Palace or St. Nathy’s), Ballaghaderreen Co Roscommon – airbnb 

5.  Kilronan Castle (formerly Castle Tenison), Ballyfarnan, County Roscommon – hotelwww.kilronancastle.ie

Sligo:

1. Ballymote Castle, County Sligo (OPW)

see my OPW entry: https://irishhistorichouses.com/2022/02/14/office-of-public-works-properties-connacht/

2. Ballynafad Castle (or Ballinafad), Co Sligo – a ruin, OPW

3. Coopershill House, Riverstown, Co. Sligo – section 482

https://irishhistorichouses.com/2022/01/11/coopershill-house-riverstown-co-sligo/
contact: Simon O’Hara
Tel: 071-9165108
www.coopershill.com
(Tourist Accommodation Facility)
Open: April-Sept, Tues-Sat, 11am-5pm
Fee: adult/child/OAP/student €5.

4. Lissadell House & Gardens, Lissadell, Ballinfull, Co. Sligo – section 482

contact: Edward Walsh
Tel: 087-2550969
www.lissadell.com
Open: June-Aug, 10am-6pm Fee: adult €14, child €7

5. Markree Castle, Collooney, Co Sligo – section 482

https://irishhistorichouses.com/2021/11/06/markree-castle-collooney-co-sligo/
contact: Nicholas Ryan
Tel: 071-9167800
www.markreecastle.ie
Open: June, July, Aug, 12 noon-4pm 
Fee: Free

6. Newpark House and Demesne, Newpark, Ballymote, Co. Sligo – section 482

https://irishhistorichouses.com/2021/11/30/newpark-house-and-demesne-newpark-ballymote-co-sligo/
contact: Christopher & Dorothy-Ellen Kitchin
Tel: 087-3706869
Open: Feb 14-18, 28, March 1-4, 28-31, April 1, 25-29, May 3-27, Aug 12-26, 9am- 1pm
Fee: adult €7, OAP/student €5, child free

7. Rathcarrick House, Rathcarrick, Strandhill Road, Co. Sligo – section 482

contact: Michael Sweeney
Tel: 071-9128417
Open: June, July, Aug, Tue-Sat, National Heritage Week Aug 13-21, 2pm-6pm Fee: adult €5, OAP/student/child free

8. Temple House, Ballymote, Co. Sligo – section 482

contact: Roderick and Helena Perceval
Tel: 087-9976045 

www.templehouse.ie
(Tourist Accommodation Facility) Open: April 1-October 31

Places to stay, County Sligo:

1. Annaghmore, Colloony, County Sligo

https://www.annaghmore.ie/history

2. Schoolhouse at Annaghmore € for 3-4

https://www.irishlandmark.com/propertytag/cottages-and-houses/?gclid=Cj0KCQiApL2QBhC8ARIsAGMm-KFInICcRSxwLSiDxfFNk5WFytNcVrLvOQYhzJbIBes4V-M65iXz0gYaAln_EALw_wcB

3. Ardtarmon Castle, Ballinfull, Co Sligo – accommodation http://www.ardtarmon.com

4. Castle Dargan Lodges, Ballygawley, Co. Sligo, Ireland https://www.castledargan.com

5. Carrowcullen old Irish Farmhouse, County Sligo www.oldirishfarmhouse.com

6. Coopershill House, Riverstown, Co. Sligo – section 482, see above

https://irishhistorichouses.com/2022/01/11/coopershill-house-riverstown-co-sligo/
contact: Simon O’Hara
Tel: 071-9165108
www.coopershill.com
(Tourist Accommodation Facility)
Open: April-Sept, Tues-Sat, 11am-5pm

7. Lissadell rental properties, County Sligo

http://lissadellhouse.com/lissadellrentals/

8. Markree Castle, Collooney, Co Sligo – section 482, see above

https://irishhistorichouses.com/2021/11/06/markree-castle-collooney-co-sligo/
contact: Nicholas Ryan
Tel: 071-9167800

www.markreecastle.ie
Open: June, July, Aug, 12 noon-4pm

9. Newpark House and Demesne, Newpark, Ballymote, Co. Sligo – section 482, see above

https://irishhistorichouses.com/2021/11/30/newpark-house-and-demesne-newpark-ballymote-co-sligo/
contact: Christopher & Dorothy-Ellen Kitchin
Tel: 087-3706869

10. Temple House, Ballymote, Co. Sligo – section 482

contact: Roderick and Helena Perceval
Tel: 087-9976045 

www.templehouse.ie
(Tourist Accommodation Facility) Open: April 1-October 31

and Gardener’s Cottage, https://hiddenireland.com/house-pages/temple-house/the-gardeners-cottage/

Tipperary:

1. Ballyowen (formerly New Park), Cashel, Co Tipperary – tours

2. Beechwood House, Ballbrunoge, Cullen, Co. Tipperary – section 482

contact: Maura & Patrick McCormack
Tel: 083-1486736
Open: Jan 10-14, 17-21, 24-28, Feb 14-18, May 6-9, 13-23, Aug 13-21, Sept 2-5, 9- 12, 16-19, 23-26, 10.15am-2.15pm

Fee: adult €5, OAP/student €2, child free, fees donated to charity

3. Cahir Castle, County Tipperary – OPW

see my OPW write-up

4. Carey’s Castle, Clonmel, County Tipperary

5. Clashleigh House, Clogheen, Co. Tipperary – section 482

contact: Elizabeth O’Callaghan
Tel: 086-8185334
Open: April 5-28, May 3-31, Tues & Thurs, June 2-30, Tue, Thurs, Sat & Sun, Aug 13-21, Sept 1-29, Oct 4-27, Tues & Thurs, 9am-1pm

Fee: adult €8, OAP/student/child €4

6. Cloughjordan House, Cloughjordan, Co. Tipperary – section 482

contact: Sarah Baker
Tel: 085-2503344
www.cloughjordanhouse.com
Open: May 2-31, June 1-30, Sept 5-30 Mon- Sat, National Heritage Week Aug 13-21, 9.30am-1.30pm

Fee: adult €6, OAP €4

7. Fancroft Mill, Fancroft, Roscrea, Co. Tipperary – section 482

contact: Marcus & Irene Sweeney
Tel: 0505-31484, 087-9263300 

www.fancroft.ie

Open: May 11-31, June 1-2, 9-30, Aug 13-22, Oct 3-7, 10am-2pm
Fee: adult €8, OAP/student €6, child free under 5 years, adult supervision essential, group rates available

8. Farney Castle, Holycross, County Tipperary

9. Grenane House, Tipperary, Co. Tipperary – section 482

contact: Philippa Mansergh-Wallace Tel: 062-52484 

www.hfhtours.ie

Open: May & Sept, Mon-Sat, Aug 13-21, 2pm-6pm, closed Sundays Fee: adult €8, student/OAP €6, group rates available

10. Hough’s Garden, Ballinderry, Nenagh, Tipperary, E45 HY51, IE 

11. Killenure Castle, Dundrum, Co Tipperary – section 482

contact: Eavaun Carmody
Tel: 087-6402664
www.killenure.com
Open: Feb 1-20, May 1-31, Aug 13-21, 10.30am-2.30pm Fee: adult €10, child /OAP/student €5

12. Lismacue House, Bansha, Co. Tipperary – section 482

contact: Katherine Nicholson
Tel: 062-54106
www.lismacue.com
(Tourist Accommodation Facility) Open: Mar 18-Oct 31

13. Nenagh Castle, County Tipperary

14. Ormond(e) Castle, Carrick-on-Suir, Tipperary – open to public 

15. Redwood Castle, Redwood, Lorrha, Nenagh, North Tipperary – section 482

Redwood is off the Birr/Portumna Rd

contact: Coleesa Egan
Tel: 087-7479566 

www.redwoodcastleireland.com

Open: June 15-30, July 1-17, Aug 9-31, Sept 1-7, 2.30pm-6.30pm Fee: adult €10, OAP/student/child €5

16. The Rectory, Cashel Road, Cahir, Co. Tipperary – section 482

contact: Richard Fahey
Tel: 087-2601994
(Tourist Accommodation FacilityOpen: May 1-Oct 31

17. Roscrea Castle and Damer House, County Tipperary – OPW

see my OPW write-up

18. Silversprings House, Clonmel, Co. Tipperary – section 482

contact: Jim Gilligan
Tel: 086-2539187
Open: May 1-31, June 1-30, Aug 13-21, 12 noon-4pm Fee: adult €6, OAP/student€3, child €2

19. Swiss Cottage, Cahir, Co. Tipperary – open to public 

Places to stay, County Tipperary

1. Ashley Park, Nenagh, Co Tipperary – accommodation

 https://hiddenireland.com/stay/bed-breakfast-guesthouses/

2. Ballinacourty House, Co Tipperary – guest house and restaurant

3. Birdhill House, Clonmel, County Tipperary

https://hiddenireland.com/house-pages/birdhill-house-gardens/

Birdhill House & Gardens offers the ultimate mix of homeliness and grandeur. The perfect place to reflect and re-energize. Enjoy the welcoming warmth of this mid 1700’s Georgian country house. Nestled in the Suir valley with panoramic views of Knockmealdown and Comeragh mountains.

Explore the tranquil and breathtaking beauty of the gardens. Take the time to relax on one of the many terraces. Sip a glass of wine or dine al fresco around the fire pit. If you feel like a little exercise you might stroll along the river bank, be tempted to take out the rowing boat/kayak. Or maybe enjoy an energetic game of tennis. On a chilly day sit by a roaring fire in the drawing room or gather friends and family around the kitchen table to play games. Hide away in the library for a quiet read surrounded by relaxed elegance. Retire to the delightfully decorated bedrooms and snuggle down for sweet dreams, but be warned: the morning chorus here at Birdhill House & Gardens is quite spectacular. Oh! And watch out for Millie and her daughter Hettie, the sweetest of dogs.

Birdhill House and Gardens offers guests luxury accommodation with the option to add breakfast and dinner if you wish.

The west wing of the house also can be exclusively rented where guests can enjoy the freedom of self-catering and is an ideal house for family breaks. Contact the house directly to check availability for the exclusive rental of Birdhill House & Gardens.”

4. Cahir House Hotel, County Tipperary €

https://www.cahirhousehotel.ie/en/

Cahir House Hotel is a Historical Town House and the leading hotel in Cahir, County Tipperary. This former manor house offers luxury hotel accommodation in Cahir and is the ideal base for your hotel break in the South East of Ireland.

This was the home of Richard Butler (1775-1819), 10th Baron Cahir and 1st Earl of Glengall and his wife, Emilia Jefferyes of Blarney Castle, when they moved from Cahir Castle. It was they who built the Swiss Cottage.

5. Cashel Palace Hotel, Cashel, County Tipperary €€€

https://www.cashelpalacehotel.ie

6. Croc an Oir, Mullinahone, County Tipperary € for 4-15

https://www.airbnb.ie/rooms/6651715?adults=1&children=0&infants=0&check_in=2023-04-18&check_out=2023-04-25&federated_search_id=06207691-0de5-49ec-8323-71f088df9e7c&source_impression_id=p3_1654355901_X6OQQUqoSRlCkOnM

Crocanoir is a home away from home tucked away down a leafy boreen. This beautifully restored house offers a truly relaxing holiday where hospitality and a traditional Irish experience is offered in abundance. It enjoys stunning views of Slievenamon mountain and there are lovely countryside walks only a stroll from the doorstep. Guests are welcome to wander the woodland paths and leave the world behind. The Old House has oodles of character and is ideal for large families or groups of friends.

7. Dundrum House, County Tipperary – hotel and self-catering cottages €€

https://www.dundrumhousehotel.com

8. The Rectory, Cashel Road, Cahir, Co. Tipperary – section 482

contact: Richard Fahey
Tel: 087-2601994
(Tourist Accommodation FacilityOpen: May 1-Oct 31

Whole house rental County Tipperary

1. Bansha Castle, County Tipperarywhole house rental €€€ for 2; € for 7-16

https://www.banshacastle.com

2. Cloughjordan House, County Tipperary https://www.cloughjordanhouse.com/contact

3. Inch House, Thurles, County Tipperary, Irelandwhole house rental €€€ for 2; €€ for 7-10

http://www.inchhouse.ie

4. Killaghy Castle, Mullinahone, Tipperarywhole house rental €€€ for 2; € for 11-14

https://www.airbnb.ie/rooms/41229269?source_impression_id=p3_1646849021_iHJka1F69OaEkVKZ

5. Kilshane, Tipperary, Co Tipperary –  

https://www.kilshanehouse.ie

6. Kilteelagh House, Dromineer, Lough Derg, County Tipperarywhole house €€€ for 2; €€ for 10-12

https://www.airbnb.ie/rooms/16299584?source_impression_id=p3_1646849122_v85eLlk0Y7hZDOYc

7. Lisheen Castle, Thurles, County Tipperary €€€ for two, € for 11-14

https://www.airbnb.ie/rooms/337170?adults=2&category_tag=Tag%3A8047&children=0&infants=0&search_mode=flex_destinations_search&check_in=2022-05-16&check_out=2022-05-21&federated_search_id=e5acaa55-1906-41d1-92c4-e1dcc2012c70&source_impression_id=p3_1652454843_bH11BQ6b7Xq9YDK0

8. Lismacue, County Tipperary, ihh member, whole house rental

www.lismacue.com
(Tourist Accommodation Facility) Open: Mar 18-Oct 31

Tyrone:

1. Ashfield Park, County Tyrone – gardens open to visitors 

http://www.ni-environment.gov.uk/index.htm 

2. Blessingbourne, Fivemiletown, County Tyrone – open for tours, self catering accommodation on the grounds 

3. Hill of The O’Neill and Ranfurly House Arts & Visitor Centre, County Tyrone

https://discovernorthernireland.com/things-to-do/hill-of-the-oneill-and-ranfurly-house-arts-and-visitor-centre-p705241

4. Killymoon Castle, County Tyrone

https://discovernorthernireland.com/things-to-do/killymoon-castle-p762011

5. Lissan House, County Tyrone

https://discovernorthernireland.com/things-to-do/lissan-house-p704981 https://www.lissanhouse.com/visit/

6. Prehen, County Tyrone

http://prehenhouse.com/?msclkid=cbb767dba6a711ec8a9ab161a56f043c

Places to stay County Tyrone

1. An Creagan,Omagh, County Tyrone € for 4 or more nights, €€ for 2 nights

https://ancreagan.com

2. Ashbrook House, Aucnacloy, County Tyrone,

https://ashbrook-house.co.uk

3. Baronscourt Estate, Newtownstewart, Omagh, County Tyrone https://barons-court.com

4. Blessingbourne Estate and Courtyard, Fivemiletown, Co Tyrone

https://www.blessingbourne.com

5. Cobblers Cottage Omagh, County Tyrone http://www.cobblerscottagecreggan.com

6. Corick House Hotel, Clogher, County Tyrone https://www.corickcountryhouse.com

7. Grange Lodge, Dungannon, County Tyrone

https://www.grangelodgecountryhouse.com

8. Kilcootry Barn, Fintona, County Tyrone

https://www.kilcootrybarn.com

9. Killymoon Castle Lodge, 302 Killymoon Road, BT80 8ZA.

10. The Lower House Rooms, Donaghmore, Dungannon, Co. Tyrone, BT70 3EZ https://thelowerhouserooms.com/rooms/

11. Spice Cottages, Dungannon, County Tyrone https://www.spicecottages.com/cottages/ginger-cottage-dungannon/

Waterford:

1. Ballynatray Estate, Co. Waterford – section 482

Postal address: Glendine, Youghal, Co. Cork

contact: Carmel O’Keeffee-Power
Tel: 024-97460
www.ballynatray.com
Open: April 1-Sept 30, 12 noon-4pm
Fee: adult €6, child OAP/student €3

2. Ballysaggartmore Towers, County Waterford

3. Bishop’s Palace Museum, Waterford

4. Cappagh House (Old and New), Cappagh, Dungarvan, Co Waterford – section 482

contact: Charles and Claire Chavasse
Tel: 087-8290860, 086-8387420
http://www.cappaghhouse.ie
Open: April, June, & August, Wednesday & Thursday, May & September Wednesday Thursday & Saturday, National Heritage Week, August 13-21, Oct 1, 9.30am-1.30pm Fee: adult/OAP/student/€5, child under 12 free

5. Cappoquin House & Gardens, Cappoquin, Co. Waterford – section 482

https://irishhistorichouses.com/2021/01/24/cappoquin-house-gardens-cappoquin-co-waterford/
contact: Sir Charles Keane
Tel: 058-54290, 087-6704180
www.cappoquinhouseandgardens.com
Open: July 1-2, 4-9, 11-16, 18-23, 25-30, Aug 1-6, 8-22, Sept 16-17, 19-24, 26-30, 9am-1pm

Gardens open all year, 9am-6pm, closed Sundays except July 17, August 14, 21, 28, Fee: house/garden €15, house only €10, garden only €6

6. Curraghmore House, Portlaw, Co. Waterford – section 482

https://irishhistorichouses.com/2020/08/01/curraghmore-portlaw-county-waterford/
contact: Vanessa Behal
Tel: 051-387101
www.curraghmorehouse.ie
Open: May, June, July, Aug, Sept, Thurs-Sun and Bank Holidays, National Heritage Week, Aug 13-21,10am-4pm

Fee: adult/OAP/student, house/garden/shell house tour €20, house €15, garden & shell house €12, garden €7, child under12 years free

7. Dromana House, Cappoquin, Co. Waterford – section 482

https://irishhistorichouses.com/2021/02/06/dromana-house-cappoquin-co-waterford/
contact: Barbara Grubb
Tel: 086-8186305
www.dromanahouse.com
Open: June 1-12, 14-19, 21-26, 28-30, July 1-3, 5-10, 12-17, 19-24, 26-31, Aug 13- 21, 2pm-6pm

Fee: adult/OAP/student, house and garden €15, house €10, garden €6, child under 12 free, groups of 100 or more house/garden €12, garden €5, house €9

8. Dungarvan Castle, Waterford

9. Fairbrook House, Garden and Museum, County Waterford

10. Lismore Castle Gardens

https://www.discoverireland.ie/waterford/lismore-castle-gardens

11. Mount Congreve Gardens, County Waterford

https://www.discoverireland.ie/waterford/mount-congreve-estate-gardens

12. The Presentation Convent, Waterford Healthpark, Slievekeel Road, Waterford – section 482

contact: Michelle O’ Brien
Tel: 051-370057

www.rowecreavin.ie
Open: Jan 1-Dec 31, excluding Bank Holidays, 8.30am-5.30pm, National Heritage Week, Aug 13-21
Fee: Free

13. Tourin House & Gardens, Tourin, Cappoquin, Co. Waterford – section 482

https://irishhistorichouses.com/2020/04/30/tourin-house-gardens-cappoquin-county-waterford/
contact: Kristin Jameson
Tel: 086-8113841
www.tourin-house.ie
Open: April 1-Sept 30, Tue-Sat, National Heritage Week Aug 13-21, 1pm-5pm
Fee: adult €6, OAP/student €3.50, child free.

Places to stay, County Waterford

1. Annestown House, County Waterford – B&B €

http://homepage.eircom.net/~annestown/welcome.htm 

2. Ballynatray, Youghal, Co Cork, holiday cottages and whole house rental 

3. Ballyrafter House, Lismore, Co Waterford – https://www.dungarvantourism.com/ballyrafter-house-hotel/

4. Cappoquin House holiday cottages, County Waterford

www.cappoquinhouseandgardens.com

5. Dromana, Co Waterford – 482. See above  €

6. Faithlegg House, Waterford, Co Waterford – hotel €€

https://www.faithlegg.com

7. Fort William, County Waterford, holiday cottages

www.fortwilliamfishing.ie

8. Gaultier Lodge, Woodstown, Co Waterford €€ 

http://www.gaultierlodge.com 

9. Glenbeg House, Glencairn, County Waterford P51 H5W0 – whole house rental http://www.glenbeghouse.com

10. Lismore Castle, whole house rental

www.lismorecastlegardens.com

11. Richmond House, Cappoquin, Co Waterford – guest house https://www.richmondcountryhouse.ie

The Earl of Cork built Richmond House in 1704. Refurbished and restored each of the 9 bedrooms feature period furniture and warm, spacious comfort. All rooms are ensuite and feature views of the extensive grounds and complimentary Wi-Fi Internet access is available throughout the house. An award winning 18th century Georgian country house, Richmond House is situated in stunning mature parkland surrounded by magnificent mountains and rivers.

Richmond House facilities include a fully licensed restaurant with local and French cuisine. French is also spoken at Richmond House. Each bedroom offers central heating, direct dial telephone, television, trouser press, complimentary Wi-Fi Internet access, tea-and coffee-making facilities and a Richmond House breakfast.”

12. Salterbridge Gate Lodge, County Waterford €

https://www.irishlandmark.com/property/salterbridge-gatelodge/

See my write-up about Salterbridge, previously on the Section 482 list but no longer:

https://irishhistorichouses.com/2020/04/16/salterbridge-house-and-garden-cappoquin-county-waterford/

and www.salterbridgehouseandgarden.com

13. Waterford Castle, The Island, Co Waterford €€

Westmeath:

1. Athlone Castle, Co Westmeath – ruin, open to visitors 

2. Belvedere House, Gardens and Park, County Westmeath

3. Lough Park House, Castlepollard, Co. Westmeath – section 482

contact: Liam O’Flanagan
Tel: 044-9661226
Open: Mar 16-22, Apr 15-18, May 1-4, June 1-7, July 14-24, Aug 1-7, 13-22, Sept 1- 7, Oct 28-31, 2pm-6pm

Fee: adult €4

4. St. John’s Church, Loughstown, Drumcree, Collinstown, Co. Westmeath – section 482

contact: Billy Standish
Tel: 044-9666570
Open: Aug 1-31, Sept 1-30, 2pm-6pm
Fee: adult €4, child/OAP/student €2

5. Tullynally Castle & Gardens, Castlepollard, Co. Westmeath – section 482

Tullynally, County Westmeath, August 2019.

https://irishhistorichouses.com/2020/11/19/tullynally-castle-and-gardens-castlepollard-county-westmeath/
contact: Octavia Tullock
Tel: 044-9661856 

www.tullynallycastle.com
Open: Castle, May 5-7, 12-14, 19-21, 26-28, June 2-4, 9-11, 16-18, 23-25, 30, July 1- 2, 7-9, 14-16, 21-23, 28-30, Aug 13-21, 25-27, Sept 1-3, 8-10, 15-17, 10am-2pm Garden: Apr 1-3, 7-10, 14-17, 21-24, 28-30, May 1-2, 5-8, 12-15, 19-22, 26-29, June 2-6, 9-12, 16-19, 23-26, 30, July 1-3, 7-10, 14-17, 21-24, 28-30, Aug 1, 4-7, 11-21, 25-28, Sept 1-4, 8-11, 15-18, 22-25, 29-30, 11am-5pm

Fee: adult, castle/garden €16, garden €8.50, child, castle/garden €8, garden €4 (over 10 years only admission to castle) families (2+2) garden €22

6. Turbotstown, Coole, Co. Westmeath – section 482

contact: Peter Bland
Tel: 086-2475044
Open: July 22-31, Aug 1-31, Dec 1-20, 9am-1pm Fee: adult/student €8, child/OAP €4

7. Tyrrelspass Castle, Co Westmeath – restaurant and gift shop 

Places to stay, County Westmeath: 

1. Annebrook House Hotel, Austin Friars Street, Mullingar, Co.Westmeath, Ireland, N91YH2F.

https://www.annebrook.ie/gallery.html

2. Lough Bawn House, Colllinstown, Co Westmeath – accommodation €€

https://hiddenireland.com/house-pages/lough-bawn-house/

A classic Georgian house in a unique setting. Lough Bawn house sits high above Lough Bane with amazing sweeping views. Nestled in a 50 acre parkland at the end of a long drive, Lough Bawn House is a haven of peace and tranquillity.

3. Mornington House, County Westmeath – accommodation 

https://hiddenireland.com/house-pages/mornington-house/

Mornington House, a historic Irish Country Manor offering luxury country house accommodation located in the heart of the Co. Westmeath countryside, just 60 miles from Ireland’s capital city of Dublin. Tranquility and warm hospitality are the essence of Mornington, home to the O’Hara’s since 1858.

Whole House Rental/Wedding Venue County Westmeath:

1. Bishopstown House, Rosemount, Westmeath – whole house rental https://www.bishopstownhouse.ie

2.  Middleton Park, Mullingar, County Westmeath – available to rent http://mph.ie

Wexford:

1. Ballyhack Castle, Co. Wexford – open to public OPW

see my OPW write-up https://irishhistorichouses.com/2022/02/07/office-of-public-works-properties-leinster-laois-longford-louth-meath-offaly-westmeath-wexford-wicklow/

2. Ballymore, Camolin, Co Wexford – museum http://www.ballymorehistoricfeatures.com

3. Berkeley Forest House, County Wexford

https://www.discoverireland.ie/wexford/berkeley-forest-house

4. Clougheast Cottage, Carne, Co. Wexford – section 482

contact: Jacinta Denieffe
Tel: 086-1234322
Open: Jan 10-31, May 1-31, August 13-21, 9am-1pm Fee: €5

5. Enniscorthy Castle, County Wexford

6. Ferns Castle, Wexford – open to public, OPW

see my OPW entry: https://irishhistorichouses.com/2022/02/07/office-of-public-works-properties-leinster-laois-longford-louth-meath-offaly-westmeath-wexford-wicklow/ 

7. Johnstown Castle, County Wexford maintained by the Irish Heritage Trust

8. Kilcarbry Mill Engine House, Sweetfarm, Enniscorthy, Co Wexford – section 482

Contact: Stephen Hegarty
Tel: 087-2854143
Open: Apr 30, May 1-13, July 25-31, Aug 1-30, Dec 12-24, 12 noon-4pm Fee: adult €10, student/OAP €5

9. Kilmokea Country Manor & Gardens, Great Island, Campile, New Ross, Co. Wexford – section 482

Contact: Mark Hewlett
Tel: 086-0227799
www.kilmokea.com
(Tourist Accommodation Facility)
Open: April – Oct
Gardens:

Open Apr, May, Sept, Oct, Wed-Sun, June, July, Aug, daily, 10am-5pm Fee: adult €7, OAP €6, student €5, child €4, family €20

10. Loftus Hall, County Wexford

https://www.discoverireland.ie/wexford/loftus-hall

11. Newtownbarry House, Wexford

12. Tintern Abbey, Ballycullane, County Wexford – concessionary entrance to IGS members, OPW

see my OPW write-up https://irishhistorichouses.com/2022/02/07/office-of-public-works-properties-leinster-laois-longford-louth-meath-offaly-westmeath-wexford-wicklow/

13. Wells House, County Wexford

Wells House, County Wexford, photograph by Brian Morrison, 2015 for Tourism Ireland, Ireland’s Content Pool. (see [1])

14. Wilton Castle, Bree, Enniscorthy, Co. Wexford – section 482

contact: Sean Windsor
(Tourist Accommodation Facility)
Tel: 053-9247738
www.wiltoncastleireland.com
Open: all year

See my write-up:https://irishhistorichouses.com/2022/02/04/wilton-castle-bree-enniscorthy-co-wexford-and-a-trip-to-johnstown-castle/

15. Woodbrook House, Killanne, Enniscorthy, Co. Wexford – section 482

contact: Giles Fitzherbert
(Tourist Accommodation Facility)
053-9255114
www.woodbrookhouse.ie
Open April 1-October 31

16. Woodville House, New Ross, Co. Wexford – section 482

contact: Gerald Roche
Tel: 087-9709828

www.woodvillegardens.ie
Open: May 1-31, June 1-30, July 1-31, Aug 1-21, 10am-2pm Fee: adult €7.50, OAP/student/child €5

Places to Stay, County Wexford

1. Artramon House, Castlebridge, Co Wexford – B&B 

https://www.artramon-farm.com/english/welcome

2. Ballytrent House, Broadway, Co Wexford

http://ballytrenthouse.com 

3. Belfry at Old Boley, County Wexford

http://oldboleywexford.com

4. Berkeley Forest, New Ross, Co Wexford – B&B? 

http://berkeleyforesthouse.com 

5. Butlerstown Castle, Tomhaggard, Co Wexford – A ruin, coach house accommodation  

http://www.butlerstowncastle.com/  

6. Clonganny House, Wexford – accommodation 

https://hiddenireland.com/bed-breakfast-guesthouses

7. Dunbrody Park, Arthurstown, County Wexford – accommodation 

WWW.DUNBRODYHOUSE.COM 

8. Fruit Hill Cottages, Fruit Hill House, Campile, New Ross, County Wexford

https://www.fruithillcottages.com/

9. Kilmokea Country Manor & Gardens, Kilmokea, Great Island, Campile, New Ross, Co. Wexford  – accommodation 

https://hiddenireland.com/house-pages/kilmokea/

Kilmokea is a former Georgian rectory, in a quiet, rural location where the Three Sister Rivers, the Suir, Nore and Barrow, meet before flowing out into Waterford Harbour. It’s rightly renowned for its seven acres of award-winning gardens, with a wide range of unusual sub-tropical plants and wonderful organic vegetables. Nearby is beautiful Hook Peninsula, with excellent coastal walks and magnificent Blue Flag beaches, or you can stay at home and relax in our private indoor pool or with a soothing aromatherapy treatment.

Kilmokea in County Wexford, was originally a simple late Georgian Church of Ireland rectory built in 1794 and bought by Colonel and Mrs. David Price, who planned and planted a seven acre garden between 1950 and the mid 1980s with determination and taste. The mild, frost-free climate allowed them to plant a wide range of unusual plants from all around the world, including a number of sub-tropical species. These all flourished at Kilmokea and the garden became justly famous.

10. Killiane Castle, County Wexford

https://killianecastle.com/our-location/ 

11. Marlfield, Gorey, Co Wexford – accommodation 

WWW.MARLFIELDHOUSE.COM 

12. Monart, Enniscorthy, Co Wexford – 5* hotel www.monart.ie

13. Rathaspeck Manor “doll’s house” gate lodge, County Wexford https://www.airbnb.ie/rooms/18288598?source_impression_id=p3_1646906004_9dSSY0tDTw%2FmQ8TE

and Manor https://www.rathaspeckmanor.ie

14. Riverbank House Hotel, The Bridge, Wexford, Ireland Y35 AH33 https://www.riverbankhousehotel.com

15. Rosegarland House, Wellingtonbridge, County Wexford – accommodation https://rosegarlandestate.ie 

16. Wells House, County Wexford – self-catering cottage accommodation

https://wellshouse.ie/self-catering-accommodation-wexford 

17. Wilton castle, Enniscorthy, Co Wexford – see above

Wilton Castle, County Wexford, November 2021.

18. Woodbrook, Killane, Co Wexford – accommodation and 482 

www.woodbrookhouse.ie 

19. Woodlands Country House, Killinierin, County Wexford B&B https://www.woodlandscountryhouse.com

20. Woodville House, New Ross, Co Wexford – 482 – see above

Whole House Rental County Wexford

1. Ballinkeele, whole house rental:

www.ballinkeele.ie

2. Horetown House, County Wexford 

3. Newbay House, County Wexford (weddings)

https://www.newbayhouse.ie/index.html

Wicklow:

1. Altidore Castle, Kilpeddar, Greystones, Co. Wicklow – section 482

see my write-up:

https://irishhistorichouses.com/2020/06/25/altidore-castle-kilpeddar-greystones-county-wicklow/
contact: Philip Emmet
Tel: 087-7601369
Open: Mar 10-29, May 1-31, June 1-3, 1pm-5pm, Aug 13-21, 2pm-6pm
Fee: adult /OAP €5, child under 12 years free, child over 12 and student negotiable, group rates.

2. Avondale House, County Wicklow

3. Ballymurrin House, Kilbride, Wicklow, Co. Wicklow – section 482

see my write-up:

https://irishhistorichouses.com/2020/11/27/ballymurrin-kilbride-county-wicklow/
contact: Philip Geoghegan
Tel: 086-1734560
www.ballymurrinquakerfarmstead.eu
Open: Jan 2-21, July 23-31, Aug 1-31, 2pm-6pm Fee: free

4. Castle Howard, Avoca, Co. Wicklow – section 482

Castle Howard, County Wicklow, September 2019.

https://irishhistorichouses.com/2020/11/13/castle-howard-avoca-county-wicklow/
contact: Ailish Macken
Tel: 01-6327664
Open: Jan 10-12, Feb 14-18, Mar 7-9, 21-23, June 21-25, 29-30, July 1-2, 11-16, 25- 28, Aug 13-21, Sept 5-10, 17, 20-24, Oct 3-5, 10-12, 9am-1pm

Fee: adult €8.50, OAP/student €6.50, child €5

5. Charleville, Enniskerry, Co. Wicklow – section 482

https://irishhistorichouses.com/2020/09/18/charleville-county-wicklow/
contact: Tatiane Baquiega
Tel: 01-6624455
Open: Feb 1-4, 7-11, 14-18, 21-25, 28, May 3-27, 30-31, June 1-3, 7, Aug 13-21, Mon-Fri, 1pm- 5pm, Sat & Sun, 9am-1pm

Fee: house €9, garden €6

6. Corke Lodge, Co Wicklow – gardens open to visitors www.corkelodge.com

7. Dower House, Rossanagh, Ashford, Co Wicklow – gardens open https://www.dublingardengroup.com/the-dower-house/

8. Festina Lente Gardens, Old Connaught Avenue, Bray, Wicklow, IE 

Tel: +353 (0) 1 272 0704 

Email: gardens@festinalente.ie 

Web: www.festinalente.ie 

The Festina Lente non-profit Walled Victorian Gardens are one of the largest working Victorian Walled Garden in Ireland and contains many beautiful features and stunning fauna and flora. 

The Ornamental Formal Garden, Pool Garden & Kitchen Garden have been restored all within the original Victorian walls from 1780’s. 

Opening Hours 

All year round. 
Mon – Fri 9 – 5 pm 
Saturday 9.30 – 6 pm 
Sun: 11 – 6 pm 
Closed Christmas Week 

9. Greenan More, Rathdrum, Co Wicklow – section 482

contact: Paul Arnold
Tel: 087-2563200
www.greenanmore.ie
Open: May 1-31, June 1-12, Aug 12-31, Sept 1-18, Wed- Sun, National Heritage Week Aug 13-21, 10am-3pm

10. Huntingbrook, – gardens open to public www.huntingbrook.com

11. Killruddery House & Gardens, Southern Cross Road, Bray, Co. Wicklow – section 482

Killruddery, County Wicklow, April 2021.

contact: Anthony Ardee
Tel: 01-2863405
www.killruddery.com
Open: Apr 1-Oct 31, Tue-Suns and Bank Holidays. National Heritage Week 13-21, 9am-6pm,
Fee: adult €8.50, garden and house tour €15.50, OAP/student €7.50, garden and house tour €13, garden and house tour €13, child €3, 4-16 years, garden and house tour €5.50

12. Kiltimon House, Newcastle, Co. Wicklow – section 482

contact: Michelle O’Connor
Tel: 087-2505205
Open: May 2-22, Aug 13-21, Sept 1-30, 9am-1pm Fee: adult €10, OAP/student/child €5

13. Kingston House, Rathdrum, Co. Wicklow – section 482

contact: Liam Lynam
Tel: 087-2415795
Open: Aug 1-31, Sept 1-30, 10am-2pm
Fee: adult €3, OAP/student/child €2

14. Knockanree Garden, Avoca, Co Wicklow – section 482, garden only

contact: Peter Campion and Valerie O’Connor
Tel: 085-8782455
www.knockanreegardens.com
Open: May 20-21, 23-28, 30-31, June 1-4, 6-11, 13-18, 20-25, 27-30, July 1-3, Aug 13-21, Oct 1, 3-8, 10-14, 9.30am-1.30pm
Fee: adult €3, OAP/student €2

15. 1 Martello Terrace, Strand Road, Bray, Co. Wicklow – section 482

contact: Liz McManus
Tel: 087-2357369
Open: May, June, Sept, Oct, Mon & Thurs, July & Aug, Mon, Thurs, & Sun, National Heritage Week, Aug 13-21, 1pm-5pm, Sunday, 9am-1pm

Fee: Free

16. Mount Usher Gardens, Ashford, Co. Wicklow – section 482, garden only

Mount Usher, County Wicklow, June 2021.

https://irishhistorichouses.com/2021/06/30/mount-usher-gardens-ashford-co-wicklow/
contact: Caitriona Mc Weeney
Tel: 01-2746900
www.mountushergardens.ie

www.avoca.com/en
Open: all year, Jan-Mar, Nov-Dec, 10am-6pm, Apr-Oct, 10am-6pm Fee: adult €9, student/OAP €8, child €5, no charge for wheelchair users

17. Powerscourt House & Gardens, Powerscourt Estate, Enniskerry, Co. Wicklow – section 482

Powerscourt House and Gardens, photograph by Chris Hill 2015, for Tourism Ireland, Ireland’s Content Pool. (see [1])

https://irishhistorichouses.com/2020/04/26/powerscourt-house-gardens-enniskerry-county-wicklow/
contact: Sarah Slazenger
Tel: 01-2046000
www.powerscourt.ie
Open: all year, closed Christmas Day and St Stephens Day, 9.30am-5.30pm, ballroom and garden rooms Sun, 9.30am-1.30pm
Fee: Mar-Oct, adult €11.50, OAP €9, student €8.50, child €5, family ticket €26, Nov- Dec, adult €8.50, OAP €7.50, student €7, child €4, family €18

19. Russborough, The Albert Beit Foundation, Blessington, Co. Wicklow – section 482

Russborough House, County Wicklow, photography by Chris Hill 2015 for Tourism Ireland, Ireland’s Content Pool. (see [1])

https://irishhistorichouses.com/2020/11/08/russborough-house-blessington-county-wicklow/
contact: Eric Blachford
Tel: 045-865239
enc@russborough.ie
Open: Jan 1-Dec 24, 10am-5pm,
Fee: adult €12, OAP/student €8, child €6, parking €3 per car

20. Tinode, Blessington, Co Wicklow – June Blake’s Garden www.juneblake.ie

21. Trudder Grange, Newtownmountkennedy, Co Wicklow – gardens open https://www.dublingardengroup.com/trudder-grange/

22. Warbel Bank gardens, Newtownmountkennedy, Wicklow 

https://www.gardensofireland.org/directory/59/warbel+bank/

Contact: Anne Condel 

Tel: +353 (0) 1 281 9298 

Email: warbelbank@yahoo.ie 

Web: www.warblebankgarden.com 

Places to stay, County Wicklow:

1. Ballyknocken House, Ashford, County Wicklow

www.ballyknocken.ie

2. Ballymurrin House, Kilbride, Co Wicklow – 482 and Airbnb 

3. Brook Lodge and Macreddin Village, County Wicklow https://www.originalirishhotels.com/hotels/brooklodge-macreddin-village

4. Cronroe, Ashford, Co Wicklow – Bel Air Hotel

www.belairhotelequestrian.com 

5. Croney Byrne, Rathdrum, Co Wicklow – courtyard accommodation

https://croneybyrne.ie

6. Druid’s Glen hotel and golf club (formerly Woodstock), Newtownmountkennedy, Co Wicklow www.druidsglenresort.com

7. June Blake’s Garden, Turkey House and Cow House, Tinode, Blessington, Co Wicklow – June Blake’s Garden 

http://www.juneblake.ie/cms/ 

8. Rathsallagh, co Wicklow – accommodation €€ 

www.rathsallagh.com

9. Summerhill House Hotel, County Wicklow

https://summerhillhousehotel.com

10. Tinakilly House, Rathnew, Co Wicklow – – country house hotel

https://tinakilly.ie 

11. Tulfarris, Blessington, Co Wicklow - hotel 

www.tulfarrishotel.com

12. Wicklow Head Lighthouse, Dunbur Head, County Wicklow € for 4

https://www.irishlandmark.com/property/wicklow-head-lighthouse/

Wicklow Head Lighthouse has safeguarded the scenic Wicklow coastline since 1781. It is a peace seeker’s haven with inspiring and refreshing views of the Irish Sea. The landscape and scenery surrounding the lighthouse provide a perfect backdrop for a unique and memorable break.

13. Gate Lodge, Woodenbridge, Avoca, County Wicklow €€ www.woodenbridgehotel.com

Airbnb: https://www.airbnb.ie/rooms/32381149?adults=2&category_tag=Tag%3A8047&children=0&infants=0&search_mode=flex_destinations_search&check_in=2022-07-10&check_out=2022-07-15&federated_search_id=c0dd098c-52b4-4f57-8873-90347b40e6c0&source_impression_id=p3_1652453929_%2FOAm61MZ%2FV9wewli

[1] https://www.irelandscontentpool.com/en

Happy New Year!

I love starting a new year. The new listing for Section 482 properties won’t be published until February or March, so at the moment we will have to rely on 2021 listings (January listings below).

I had an amazing 2021 and visited lots of properties! As well as those I’ve written about so far, I am hoping to hear back for approval for a few more write-ups. Last year Stephen and I visited thirteen section 482 properties, thirteen OPW properties, and some other properties maintained by various groups.

The Section 482 properties we visited were Mount Usher gardens and Killruddery in County Wicklow; Killineer House and gardens in County Louth; Salthill Gardens in County Donegal; Stradbally Hall in County Laois; Enniscoe in County Mayo; Tullynally in County Westmeath; Kilfane Glen and Waterfall in County Kilkenny; Killedmond Rectory in County Carlow; Coopershill, Newpark and Markree Castle in County Sligo and Wilton Castle in County Wexford.

Mount Usher Gardens, County Wicklow (June 2021).
Killruddery, County Wicklow (we visited in April 2021).
Killineer House and Gardens, County Louth (visited in June 2021).
Salthill Gardens, County Donegal (visited in July 2021.
Stradbally Hall, County Laois (visited in June 2021).
Enniscoe, County Mayo (visited in August 2021).
Tullynally, County Westmeath (visited in August 2021).
Kilfane Glen and Waterfall, County Kilkenny (visited in August 2021).
Gardens at Killedmond Rectory, County Carlow (visited in August 2021).
Coopershill, County Sligo (visited in August 2021).
Newpark House, County Sligo (visited in August 2021).
Markree Castle, County Sligo (visited in August 2021).
Wilton Castle, County Wexford (visited in November 2021).

The OPW properties we visited were Dublin Castle, the Irish National War Memorial Gardens, National Botanic Gardens, Rathfarnham Castle, St. Stephen’s Green, Iveagh Gardens, Phoenix Park and Royal Hospital Kilmainham in Dublin; Emo Court, County Laois; Portumna Castle, County Galway; Fore Abbey in County Westmeath; Parke’s Castle, County Leitrim; and Ballymote Castle, County Sligo.

Inside Dublin Castle (visited in September 2021).
Irish National War Memorial Gardens, Dublin, designed by Lutyens (we go walking here all the time!).
National Botanic Gardens, Dublin (visited in September 2021).
Inside Rathfarnham Castle (visited in September 2021).
The Iveagh Gardens, Dublin (visited in October 2021).
The Gardens at Royal Hospital Kilmainham (visited in January 2022).
Emo Park, County Laois (visited in June 2021).
Portumna Castle, Galway (visited in July 2021).
Fore Abbey, County Westmeath (visited in August 2021).
Parke’s Castle, County Leitrim, maintained by the OPW (visited in August 2021).
Ballymote Castle, County Sligo (visited in August 2021).

We also visited Duckett’s Grove, maintained by Carlow County Council; Woodstock Gardens and Arbortetum maintained by Kilkenny County Council; Johnstown Castle, County Wexford maintained by the Irish Heritage Trust (which also maintains Strokestown Park, which we have yet to visit – hopefully this year! it’s a Section 482 property – and Fota House, Arboretum and Gardens, which we visited in 2020); Dunguaire Castle, County Clare, which is maintained by Shannon Heritage, as well as Newbridge House, which we also visited in 2021. Shannon Heritage also maintains Bunratty Castle, Knappogue Castle and Cragganowen Castle in County Clare, King John’s Castle in Limerick, which we visited in 2019, Malahide Castle in Dublin which I visited in 2018, GPO museum, and the Casino model railway museum. We also visited Belvedere House, Gardens and Park – I’m not sure who maintains it (can’t see it on the website).

Duckett’s Grove, County Carlow (visited in August 2021).
Woodstock House, County Kilkenny, maintained by Kilkenny County Council (visited in August 2021).
Johnstown Castle, County Wexford, maintained by the Irish Heritage Trust (visited in November 2021).
Dunguaire Castle, County Clare (visited in July 2021).
Newbridge House, County Dublin (visited in June 2021).
Belvedere House, County Westmeath (visited in August 2021).

We were able to visit two historic properties when we went to view auction sales at Townley Hall, County Louth and Howth Castle, Dublin.

The domed rotunda in Townley Hall, County Louth (visited in October 2021).
Howth Castle, County Dublin (visited in September 2021).

Finally some private Big Houses that we visited, staying in airbnbs, were Annaghmore in County Sligo and Cregg Castle in Galway.

Annaghmore, County Sligo, where we stayed as airbnb guests with Durcan and Nicola O’Hara (in August 2021).
Cregg Castle, County Galway (in July 2021).

Here are the listings for January 2021:

Cavan

Cabra Castle (Hotel)

Kingscourt, Co. Cavan

Howard Corscadden.

Tel: 042-9667030

www.cabracastle.com

Open dates in 2021: all year, except Dec 24, 25, 26, 11am-12 midnight

Fee: Free

Cabra Castle, County Cavan.

Corravahan House & Gardens

Corravahan, Drung, Ballyhaise, Co. Cavan

Ian Elliott

Tel: 087-9772224

www.corravahan.com

Open dates in 2021: Jan 4-5, 11-12, 18-19, 25-26, Feb 1-2, 8-9, 15-16, 22-23, Mar 1-2, 8-9, May 4- 5, 9-12, 16-19, 23-26, 30-31, June 1-4, Aug 14-31, Sept 1-2, 9am-1pm, Sundays 2pm- 6pm
Fee: adult €10, OAP/student/child €5 

Corravahan, County Cavan.

Clare

Newtown Castle

Newtown, Ballyvaughan, Co. Clare

Mary Hawkes- Greene

Tel: 065-7077200

www.newtowncastle.com , www.burrencollege.ie

Open dates in 2021: Jan 4-May 31, Mon-Fri, June 1-30 Mon-Sat, July 1-Aug 31 daily, Sept 1-Dec 17 Mon-Fri, 10am-5pm
Fee: Free 

Newtown Castle, County Clare. Photograph from National Inventory of Architectural Heritage.

Cork

Blarney Castle & Rock Close

Blarney, Co. Cork

C. Colthurst

Tel: 021-4385252

www.blarneycastle.ie

Open dates in 2021: all year except Christmas Eve & Christmas Day, Jan-Mar, Mon-Sat, 9am- sundown, Sun, 9am-6pm 

Apr-May, 9am-6pm, June-Aug, Mon-Sat, 9am-7pm, Sun, 9am-6pm, Sept, Mon-Sat, 9am-6.30pm, Sun, 9am-6pm,
Oct, Nov, Dec daily 9am-6pm,
Fee: adult €18, OAP/student €15, child €10, family and season passes 

Brideweir House

Conna, Co. Cork

Ronan Fox

Tel: 087-0523256

Open dates in 2021: Jan 1-Dec 24, 11am-4pm 

Fee: adult €10, OAP/student €5, child free

Woodford Bourne Warehouse

Sheares Street, Cork

Edward Nicholson

Tel: 021-4273000

www.woodfordbournewarehouse.com

Open dates in 2021: all year except Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, 1pm-11pm 

Fee: Free

Donegal

Portnason House 

Portnason, Ballyshannon, Co. Donegal
Madge Sharkey
Tel: 086-3846843
Open dates in 2021: Jan 18-22, 25-29, Feb 1-5, 8-12, Aug 14-30, Sept 1-17, 20-23, 27-28, Nov 15- 19, 22-26, Dec 1-3 6-10, 13-14, 9am-1pm 

Fee: adult €8, OAP/student/child €5 

Dublin City

Bewley’s 

78-79 Grafton Street/234 Johnson’s Court, Dublin 2

Peter O’ Callaghan

Tel 087-7179367

www.bewleys.com

Open dates in 2021: all year except Christmas Day, 

11am-7pm Fee: Free 

Hibernian/National Irish Bank

23-27 College Green, Dublin 2

Dan O’Sullivan 

Tel: 01-6755100

www.clarendonproperties.ie

Open dates in 2021: all year, except Dec 25, Wed-Fri 9.30am-8pm, Sun 11am-7pm, Sat, Mon, Tue, 9.30-7pm 

Fee: Free 

Powerscourt Townhouse Centre

59 South William Street, Dublin 2

Mary Larkin

Tel: 01-6717000

Open dates in 2021: All year except New Year’s Day, Easter Sunday, Easter Monday, Christmas Day, St. Stephen’s Day & Bank Holidays, Mon-Sat, 10am-6pm, Thurs, 10am-8pm, Sundays, 12 noon-6pm

Fee: Free

Powerscourt Townhouse, Dublin City.

10 South Frederick Street

Dublin 2

Joe Hogan

Tel: 087-2430334

Open dates in 2021: Jan 1-24, May 1, 3-8, 10-15, 17-22, 24-27, Aug 14-22, 2pm-6pm 

Fee: Free 

County Dublin 

“Geragh” 

Sandycove Point, Sandycove, Co. Dublin

Gráinne Casey

Tel: 01-2804884

Open dates in 2021: Jan 28-29, Feb 1-5, 8-12, 15-22, May 4-31, Aug 14-22, Sept 1-3, 2pm-6pm Fee: adult €7, OAP €4, student €2, child free  

Meander

Westminister Road, Foxrock, Dublin 18,

Ruth O’Herlihy, 

Tel: 087-2163623

Open dates in 2021: Jan 4-8, 11-15, 18-22, 25-29, May 1, 4-8, 10-11, 17-22, June 8-12, 14-19, 21- 26, Aug 14-22, 9am-1pm 

Fee: adult €5, OAP/child/student €2 

Tibradden House

Mutton Lane, Rathfarnham, Dublin 16

Selina Guinness

Tel: 01-4957483

www.selinaguinness.com

Open dates in 2021: Jan 14-17, 23-24, 28-29, Feb 4-7, 11-12, 19-21, 26-28, May 3-13,16, 18-20, 23-27, June 2-4, 8-10, 14-16, 19-20, Aug 14-22, weekdays 2.30pm-6.30pm, weekends 10.30am-2.30pm
Fee: adult/OAP €8 student €5, child free, Members of An Taisce the The Irish Georgian Society (with membership card) €5 

Galway 

Woodville House Dovecote & Walls of Walled Garden 

Craughwell, Co. Galway
Margarita and Michael Donoghue
Tel: 087-9069191
www.woodvillewalledgarden.com
Open dates in 2021: Jan 29-31, Feb 1-28, Apr 1-13, 11am- 4.30pm, June 1, 6-8, 13-15, 21-22, 27- 29, July 10-11, 17-18, 24-25, 31, Aug 1-2, 6-8, 13-22, 27-29, Sept 4-5, 11am-5pm Fee: adult/OAP €6, child €3, student, €5, family €20, guided tours €10 

Kerry

Derreen Gardens

Lauragh, Tuosist, Kenmare, Co. Kerry

John Daly

Tel: 087-1325665

www.derreengarden.com 

Open dates in 2021: all year, 10am-6pm

Fee: adult/OAP/student €8, child €3, family ticket (2 adults and all children under 18 and 2 maps) €20 

Kildare

Farmersvale House

Badgerhill, Kill, Co. Kildare

Patricia Orr

Tel: 086-2552661

Open dates in 2021: Jan 18-31, Feb 1-6, July 23-31, Aug 1-31, 9.30am-1.30pm
Fee: adult €5, student/child/OAP €3, (Irish Georgian Society members free) 

Harristown House

Brannockstown, Co. Kildare

Hubert Beaumont
Tel: 087-2588775

www.harristownhouse.ie

Open dates in 2021: Jan 11-15, 18-22, Feb 8-12, 15-19, May 4-28, June 7-11, Aug 14-22, Sept 6-10, 9am-1pm 

Fee: adult/OAP/student €10, child €5 

Harristown House, County Kildare.

Kildrought House

Celbridge Village, Co. Kildare

June Stuart

Tel: 01-6271206, 087-6168651

Open dates in 2021: Jan 1-20, May 18-26, Aug 11-31,10am-2pm
Fee: adult €6, OAP/student/child €3, child under 5 years free, school groups €2 per head 

Moyglare Glebe

Moyglare, Maynooth, Co. Kildare

Joan Hayden

Tel: 01-8722238

Open dates in 2021: Jan 4-8, 11-15, 18-22, 25-29, May 1-31, Aug 14-22, Sept 4-7, 8.30am-12.30pm Fee: adult €6, OAP/student/child €3 

Kilkenny

Kilkenny Design Centre

Castle Yard, Kilkenny

Joseph O’ Keeffe, Tel: 064-6623331

www.kilkennydesign.com

Open dates in 2021: all year,10am-7pm 

Fee: Free

Laois

Ballaghmore Castle

Borris in Ossory, Co. Laois

Grace Pym

Tel: 0505-21453

www.castleballaghmore.com

Open dates in 2021: all year, 9.30am-6pm
Fee: adult €5, child/OAP €3, student free, family of 4, €10 

Leitrim

Manorhamilton Castle (Ruin)

Castle St, Manorhamilton, Co. Leitrim

Anthony Daly

Tel: 086-2502593

Open dates in 2021: Jan 7-Dec 21, National Heritage Week, Aug 14-22, closed Sat & Sun, 10am- 5pm
Fee: adult €5, child free 

Limerick

Ash Hill 

Kilmallock, Co. Limerick

Simon and Nicole Johnson 

Tel: 063-98035

www.ashhill.com

(Tourist Accommodation Facility)

Open dates in 2021: Jan 15-Oct 31, Nov 1-29, Dec 1-15, 9am-4pm Fee: adult/student €5, child/OAP free 

Glebe House

Bruff, Co. Limerick

Colm McCarthy

Tel: 087-6487556

Open dates in 2021: Jan 4-29, May 10-28, Aug 13-22, Sept 13-24, Mon-Fri, 5.30pm-9.30pm, Sat- Sun, 8am-12 noon 

Fee: Free 

Mayo

Brookhill House

Brookhill, Claremorris, Co. Mayo

Patricia and John Noone

Tel: 094-9371348

Open dates in 2021: Jan 13-20, Apr 13-20, May 18-24, June 8-14, July 13-19, Aug 1-23, 2pm-6pm

Fee: adult €6, student €3, OAP/child/National Heritage Week free

Meath

Cillghrian Glebe now known as Boyne House Slane (or Stackallan)

Slane, Co. Meath

Alan Haugh

Tel: 041-9884444

www.boynehouseslane.ie

Open dates in 2021: all year, National Heritage Week, Aug 14-22, 9am-1pm Fee: Free 

Dardistown Castle

Dardistown, Julianstown, Co. Meath

Lizanne Allen

Tel: 086 -2774271

www.dardistowncastle.ie

Open dates in 2021: Jan 9-31, Feb 11-21, May 15-21, Aug 14-31, Sept 1-30, 10am-2pm Fee: adult €6, student/OAP €5, child free 

Dardistown Castle, County Meath.

Gravelmount House 

Castletown, Kilpatrick, Navan, Co. Meath
Brian McKenna
Tel: 087-2520523
Open dates in 2021: Jan 1-13, May 10-30, June 1-20, Aug 14-22, 9am-1pm Fee: adult €6, OAP/student/child €3 

Moyglare House

Moyglare, Co. Meath

Postal address Maynooth Co. Kildare

Angela Alexander

Tel: 086-0537291

www.moyglarehouse.ie

Open dates in 2021: Jan 1, 4-8, 11-15, 18-22, 25-29, May 1-21, 24-28, 31, June 1-3, Aug 14-22, 9am-1pm
Fee: adult €7.50, OAP/student/child €5 

St. Mary’s Abbey

High Street, Trim, Co. Meath

Peter Higgins 

Tel: 087-2057176

Open dates in 2021: Jan 25-29, Feb 22-26, Mar 8-12, Apr 12-16, May 24-30, June 21-27, July 19- 25, Aug 14-22, Sept 13-17, 20-24, 2pm-6pm 

Fee: adult €5, OAP/student/child €2 

Tankardstown House 

Rathkenny, Slane, Co. Meath

Tadhg Carolan, Tel: 087-7512871

www.tankardstown.ie

Open dates in 2021: All year including National Heritage Week, 9am-1pm

Fee: Free

Tankardstown, County Meath.

Monaghan

Castle Leslie

Glaslough, Co. Monaghan

Samantha Leslie 

Tel: 047-88091

www.castleleslie.com

(Tourist Accommodation Facility)

Open dates in 2021: all year, National Heritage Week, events August 14-22 Fee: Free 

Castle Leslie, County Monaghan.

Offaly

Ballybrittan Castle

Ballybrittan, Edenderry, Co. Offaly

Rosemarie

Tel: 087-2469802 

Open dates in 2021: Jan 3-4, 10-11, 17-18, 23-24, 30-31, Feb 6-7, 13-14, 20-21, 27-28, Mar 6-7,13- 14, 20-21, 27-28, May 1-2, 8-9, 15-16, 22-23, June 12-13,19-20, 26-27, July 3-4,10- 11,17-18, 24-25, 31, Aug 14-22, Sept 4-14, 2pm-6pm. 

Fee: free – except in case of large groups a fee of €5 p.p. 

Corolanty House

Shinrone, Birr, Co. Offaly

Siobhan Webb

Tel: 086-1209984

Open dates in 2021: Jan, Feb, July, Aug, Sept, daily 2pm-6pm

Fee: Free

Crotty Church

Castle Street, Birr, Co. Offaly

Brendan Garry

Tel: 086-8236452

Open dates in 2021: All year, except Dec 25, 9am-5pm 

Fee: Free

High Street House

High Street, Tullamore, Co. Offaly

George Ross

Tel: 086-3832992

www.no6highstreet.com

Open dates in 2021: Jan 4-8, 11-15, 18-22, 25-29, May 1-18, Aug 14-22, Sept 1-24, 9.30am-1.30pm Fee: adult/student €5, OAP €4, child under 12 free 

Springfield House 

Mount Lucas, Daingean, Tullamore, Co. Offaly Muireann Noonan
Tel: 087-2204569
www.springfieldhouse.ie 

Open dates in 2021: Jan 1-14, 1pm-5pm, May 14-16, 24-28, July 2-4, 9-11, 16-18, Aug 7-29, 2pm- 6pm, Dec 26-31, 1pm-5pm
Fee: Free 

Roscommon

Strokestown Park House

Strokestown Park House, Strokestown, Co. Roscommon

Ciarán

Tel: 01-8748030

www.strokestownpark.ie

Open dates in 2021: Jan 2-Dec 20, Jan, Feb, Mar 1-16, Nov, Dec,10.30am-4pm, March 17-Oct 31, 10.30am-5.30pm,
Fee: adult €14, €12.50, €9.25, OAP/student €12.50, child €6, family €29, groups €11.50 

Tipperary

Beechwood House

Ballbrunoge, Cullen, Co. Tipperary

Maura & Patrick McCormack

Tel: 083-1486736

Open dates in 2021: Jan 4-8, 18-22, Feb 1-5, 8-12, May 1-3, 14-17, 21-24, June 11-14, 18-21, Aug 14-22, Sept 3-6, 10-13, 17-20, 24-27, 10.15am-2.15pm 

Fee: adult €5, OAP/student €2, child free, fees donated to charity 

Waterford 

The Presentation Convent 

Waterford Healthpark, Slievekeel Road,Waterford Michelle O’ Brien
www.rowecreavin.ie
Tel: 051-370057 

Open dates in 2021: Jan 1-Dec 31, excluding Bank Holidays and Sundays, Mon-Fri, 8am-6pm, Sat, 10am-2pm, National Heritage Week, Aug 14-22
Fee: Free 

Wexford

Clougheast Cottage

Carne, Co. Wexford

Jacinta Denieffe

Tel: 086-1234322

Open dates in 2021: Jan 11-31, May 1-31 August 14-22, 9am-1pm Fee: €5 

Wilton Castle

Bree, Enniscorthy, Co. Wexford

Sean Windsor

(Tourist Accommodation Facility)

Tel: 053-9247738 

www.wiltoncastleireland.com   

Open dates in 2021: all year

Wilton Castle, County Wexford.

Wicklow

Castle Howard

Avoca, Co. Wicklow

Mark Sinnott

Tel: 087-2987601

Open dates in 2021: Jan 11-13, Feb 1-5, Mar 1-3, 22-24, June 10-12, 14-15, 19, 21-26, 28, July 5-9, 19-22, Aug 13-22, Sept 6-11, 18, 25, Oct 4-6, 11-13, 9am-1pm 

Fee: adult €8.50, OAP/student €6.50, child €5 

Castle Howard, County Wicklow.

Mount Usher Gardens

Ashford, Co. Wicklow

Caitriona Mc Weeney

Tel: 0404-49672

www.mountushergardens.ie

Open dates in 2021: all year 10am-6pm

Fee: adult €8, student/OAP €7, child €4, no charge for wheelchair users

Powerscourt House & Gardens

Powerscourt Estate, Enniskerry, Co. Wicklow

Sarah Slazenger

Tel: 01-2046000

www.powerscourt.ie

Open: All year, closed Christmas day and St Stephens day, 9.30am-5.30pm, ballroom and garden rooms Sun, 9.30am-1.30pm
Fee: Mar-Oct, adult €11.50, OAP €9, student €8.50, child €5, family ticket €26, Nov- Dec, adult €8.50, OAP €7.50, student €7, child €4, family ticket 2 adults + 3 children €18, children under 5 free 

Powerscourt, County Wicklow.